Au Bon Pain to open in library

first_imgHungry students will no longer make a “LaFun run” to refuel during late-night study marathons in the Hesburgh Library now that Au Bon Pain will open on the library’s first floor in November.   The café will supplant the vending machines in the first floor lounge, which have been relocated to the basement lobby. Associate Director of Retail and Food Services Administration Mark King said the addition of Au Bon Pain will satisfy the cravings of a large portion of the Notre Dame community. “Au Bon Pain is a bakery, fresh sandwiches, soups and salads place very similar to Panera Bread,” King said. “Au Bon Pain actually created Panera Bread … a lot of people on campus want Panera Bread but we aren’t a big enough market to warrant a Panera Bread – this way we are able to satisfy that group of people without duplicating anything we already had on campus.” The continual product development and variety at Au Bon Pain will add to the café’s appeal, King said.   “They have a coffee/barista station, a plain coffee station, a smoothie section, sandwich section, premade sandwiches and salads, breakfasts and oatmeal served in the morning, and different soups that are appealing and different,” King said. “The menu will change periodically as well, with seasonal salads and soups and fresh baked goods.” Michael Davy, Food Services administration continuous improvement manager and future manager of the library’s Au Bon Pain, said he suspects the café will receive a lot of foot traffic. “I think people will come and try what’s offered at the café because people want to experience something a little different,” Davy said. “We’ll hit traditional meal periods, and outside of traditional meal periods students that use the library will be able to stop by and get a sandwich, use our full espresso coffee or smoothie programs or get a late night snack.” Hesburgh Library Facilities Manager Ross Ferguson said a joint team of Food Services staff and Hesburgh Library staff concluded Au Bon Pain was the best option for the library. “A committee of five of us met with Food Services to discuss Au Bon Pain and other local and national options,” Ferguson said.  “Au Bon Pain we could get going by November, but the other options would push us back to 2013.” Davy said Food Services looked for a restaurant that would compliment the other eateries on campus, fit in the available physical space and satisfy consumers. “A few factors in the decision were the quality of the menu’s offerings, the corporate franchise support and uniqueness of the new café – there’s not one in the immediate area,” Davy said. “Primarily though, the biggest thing was the quality of the food.” The focus at Au Bon Pain is on producing fresh food, Davy said. “One of the interesting quality principles of Au Bon Pain Corporation is that any prepackaged item that’s made for sale in a to-go container is made for sale that day, on that day,” Davy said. “You can get made-to-order things, but nothing is held over to the next day… that speaks to the quality principles of the franchise.” The café will even make nutritional information readily accessible, Davy said. “We will have a nutritional kiosk where any customer can use a touch screen to find out the nutritional components of any of the menu items in the store,” hy said. King said Au Bon Pain’s structure will work well with the café’s planned schedule. “Au Bon Pain’s concept has the ability to expand and contract based on the [consumer] volume, which is very convenient,” King said.  “This enables the café to act as an accordion: there are going to be busy times and slow times, especially because we’re looking at being open for a very long time([7 a.m. to 1 a.m ]. At the times with less traffic fresh sandwiches probably won’t be offered.” Ferguson said he did some personal research to test how well-suited the first floor of the library would be for Au Bon Pain. “We wanted to see how many people were walking by that location in order to show that this was a viable place for the café,” Ferguson said.  “I watched the number of people passing one mornin, and counted 72 people coming in from the parking lot, most of them with coffee in their hands.” Many student concerns revolved around the accessibility of the future café, Ferguson said. “We feel that a large percentage of the students want places open, that they feel there are not enough places open on campus [that late]… the café going in, courtyard being finished and fishbowl renovation all go into the big picture plan,” Ferguson said. The affordable price point Au Bon Pain offers made it an attractive choice, Ferguson said. It doesn’t make sense to bring in a big fancy place that [students] can’t afford,” Ferguson said.  “DomersDollars, fresh food, healthy choices: that’s what the students asked for.” Senior Tyler Bartlow said he thinks students will appreciate the café’s accessibility.   “It will be great to have a food option within the library when I’m studying,” Bartlow said. Senior Ashlee Hunt said she is looking forward to the addition of an eatery to the library. “I don’t know what it is but I’m excited for food to be in the library, especially relatively inexpensive, healthy food,” Hunt said. King said the café will open in November. “We’re shooting for a November 12 opening date, but that’s contingent on construction getting done,” King said.   It will be interesting to open it up during a football week, but that will help us give it a big kick-off.”last_img read more

Read More →

Alumni serve in Washington

first_imgWith five alumni gaining or holding seats in Congress following last week’s election, the University’s ties to national politics are more prominent than ever. Rep. Joe Donnelly’s election to the U.S. Senate, Keith Rothfus’s win for a seat in the House of Representatives and the re-elections of Peter Visclosky, Peter King and Michael Kelly to the House offer strong avenues for advocating the University’s interests on Capitol Hill said John Sturm, associate vice president for Federal and Washington Relations. Sturm, a 1969 Notre Dame graduate, was appointed to the newly-formed position on June 1. He’s been tasked with communicating the University’s views to federal officials, including the aforementioned alumni. He said the degree to which the University works with alumni in Washington depends on the committees they sit on. “We don’t know what committees [Donnelly] is going to serve on,” he said. “That has some effect on what he does and how he might interface with the University.” Regardless of where Donnelly ends up, Sturm is excited for the opportunity to collaborate with the 1977 alumnus. “Not only is he a Notre Dame alum, but he comes from South Bend. He lives locally and his wife works at the University,” he said. “That’s about as good a relationship as one can expect, and frankly, Joe Donnelly is a very easy person to be around.” Sturm said future committee placement is clearer for Rep. Visclosky, a 1973 graduate of the Law School returning for his 15th term in the House. “He’s been on the Appropriations Committee for ages. I think he’s likely to become the ranking member of the [defense] subcommittee … that’s a pretty big deal,” Sturm said. “Congressman Visclosky has been a terrific friend of Notre Dame. He recently visited campus and we were able to show him a few facilities where his help has brought fruit for Notre Dame.” Given the limits on committee chair tenures, Rep. King’s committee assignment is unclear following his re-election, Sturm said. “Pete King has been chairman of the Homeland Security Committee in the House … We don’t know yet, but we should know fairly soon whether he’s going to move to another committee as chairman or if he’s going to get a waiver to continue on homeland security.” While the University has little at stake within the area of homeland security, King’s high profile has done much for the Notre Dame brand in Washington, Sturm said. “King has been pretty prominent when major things happen around the world or domestically,” Sturm said. “He’s been on radio, television and newspapers a lot … We’re waiting to see what happens with him.” As for the remaining alumni in Congress, Sturm said the formal interactions with the University have been minimal so far. “Mike Kelly, I think he’s been on foreign affairs. We haven’t had much to do with Congressman Kelly as of yet. Committee assignments mean a lot,” he said. “Keith Rothfus [hasn’t had] any committee assignments yet. We’re not really sure where he wants to go.” Regardless of whether their area of policy focus is directly relevant to the University, Sturm said each elected alumnus benefits Notre Dame. “The more the merrier. When members are Notre Dame alums … for example, they can have an effect – especially if they’re the chairman or ranking member on a committee – on witnesses brought into a hearing,” he said. “To have witnesses in front of Congress to provide information for policy makers, they get quoted in the press or appear on TV, all that contributes to the overall image and success of the University.” Sturm said the alumni voted into office last week aren’t the only ones on Capitol Hill building the Notre Dame alumni presence. “There’s also a strong, great group of Notre Dame alumni, parents and friends who make their living around the federal government – lawyers, lobbyists, trade association folks, journalists, defense contractors – who interact one way or another with the federal government or whose businesses depend on the federal government,” he said. “For them to be successful and prominent is another way the University’s image goes north, and they’re a resource for Notre Dame.” While their relationship with the University doesn’t affect the voting or policy stances of Notre Dame alumni in office, Sturm said the affiliation allows for smoother communications. “It just is a lot easier. You have faster and easier access and there’s familiarity with the alums. I make it my business to get around and see them,” he said. “That extends to the Indiana delegation as well.” Regardless of where officials were educated, Sturm said the University’s reputation carries weight in Washington. “Representing the University of Notre Dame, I don’t think there are too many people who haven’t heard of us. It’s a great brand. Other than some of the Ivies … we’re in that league, generally speaking,” he said. “Partly because of our Catholic significance and because of our reputation as a great undergraduate school that produces people who are not only successful, but seem to be successful by doing things the right way.” Contact John Cameron at jcamero2@nd.edulast_img read more

Read More →

Professor researches potential allergy treatment

first_imgBasar Bilgicer, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Advanced Diagnostics and Therapeutics Initiative, said groundbreaking scientific advances have taken a step towards preventative treatment possible for millions of Americans who suffer from life-threatening allergies. He said he and his team have made progress towards the first-ever inhibitory therapy for Type I Hypersensitive allergic reactions.  “These type of allergies are potentially lethal,” he said. “Unfortunately, there are no available medications that can prevent the occurrence of an allergic response to … Type I allergies.”  Type I hypersensitive responses occur by the components of the immune system designed to fight harmful parasites when mast cells and basophils, both of which are types of white blood cells, respond to harmless allergens with symptoms that can be as devastating as potentially lethal anaphylactic shock, Bilgicer said.  The only treatments currently available for severe allergies, like an EpiPen, attempt to manage symptoms until a victim can be taken to the hospital, Bilgicer said.  Bilgicer, also part of the Center for Rare and Neglected Diseases and the Harper Cancer Center, said his team of Notre Dame researchers are working on the  design and synthesis of Heterobivalent Inhibitors (HBI), which bind more effectively to mast cells and basophils than allergens like shellfish and peanuts. “Our approach is to stop it before it takes place,” Bilgicer said. “Our molecules are designed so that they will compete with the allergen molecule in binding to the receptor in mast cells and basophils. Our molecule binds more effectively, blocking binding of allergens and keeping allergic reactions from happening in the first place.” He said HBI molecules have worked successfully in cellular and animal tests in mice, and although all the ideas were developed at Notre Dame, his group has been in collaboration with Dr. Mark Kaplan’s at Indiana University (IU).  “We did all the design and synthesis here,” Bilgicer said. “The animal studies were verified at IU Med School in Dr. Kaplan’s lab.”  This allergy research has been in development since Bilgicer joined the Notre Dame faculty in 2008, and he said Dr. Michael Handlogten, a recently graduated PhD student, worked as the leading scientist on the project since its initiation. Bilgicer said the most updated version of these advances, included the findings from the mice studies, were published in the Nature Chemical Biology Journal.  Bilgicer said Notre Dame partly funded his research, but the project also received support from the National Institute of Health’s National Institute of Allergic and Infections Diseases.  Society increasingly needs this groundbreaking inhibitory treatment, as Type I allergies become more prevalent, Bilgicer said.  “At present, there is a strong prevalence of peanut allergies, unfortunately,” he said. “The number of cases is increasing.”. People could eventually use Bilgicer’s HPI research with severe allergies in multiple ways, he said. First, it could work to replace an EpiPen if symptoms of a reaction begin to occur. It could also be used if an exposure to a deadly allergen is likely, like when sending a child to school, he said. “If you are allergic to peanuts and you know you are getting on a flight, you could take an HPI,” he said. “The dust from the guy next to you opening a bag of peanuts can cause deadly reactions, which has happened before.” He said another important usage could be in Immunotherapy, which involves slow exposure to an allergen so that they body gradually learns that the allergen is not actually harmful, eventually leading to tolerance. Currently, he said most Type I allergy sufferers cannot safely be exposed to any amount of their allergen. “We could give the allergen in presence of HPI to control the effects of the allergen and reduce the symptoms for a patient,” he said. “Therefore, HBI can potentially be used in conjunction with immunotherapy to treat Type I hypersensitivity.” Bilgicer said he plans to develop a specific HPI for each type of allergen that causes Type I allergic reactions.  “The next step is to take this away from model system and into a system where it would be more relevant to natural allergens,” he said. “The HBI needs to be redesigned for every new allergen. To inhibit, say, peanuts we have to make a new HBI, and that is the next step in our research.” Contact Abi Hoverman at ahoverma@nd.edulast_img read more

Read More →

Young entrepreneurs work and learn in South Bend

first_imgA week before fall break, 14 young entrepreneurs in the Young Leaders from the Americas Initiatives (YLAI) Professional Fellows program arrived in South Bend to spend four weeks in professional exchange with local companies and industries.The State Department program helps entrepreneurs from Latin America and the Caribbean improve businesses in their home countries. Two hundred fifty people in the program are divided among 21 U.S. states. Notre Dame’s Initiative for Global Investment is hosting and supporting the 14 in South Bend. “This program is amazing, as we get to know entrepreneurs from our area,” Daniella Garcia, a program fellow, said. “In November all the [250] of us will be together for a conference in Washington D.C. There will also be investors pitching us, and lots of networking, and we are all excited.” Garcia is the founder and owner of Elemental, a tech teaching center in Bolivia. YLAI assigned her to a local programming school in South Bend. “I’ve learned the methodology in teaching, and I’m helping them with the plan for a summer camp in June,” she said. “In Bolivia, we really need some funds, so South Bend coding school is also teaching me how to get grants from government and nonprofit organizations.”The 14 entrepreneurs are assigned to different companies in South Bend according to the industry in which they work at home. Karla Pacheco, director of the Cocrea Creative Agency in El Salvador, is working for Pathfinders, a marketing agency. “I’m learning how big companies like the Pathfinder are organizing their team and work,” she said. “My goal is to organize my team more sufficiently so we can have more clients.”  It is easier to get ideas accepted in the U.S., said Santiago Yelmini, co-founder of LATIO 6, an entrepreneurship community in Argentina. Yelmini is working on a learning forum that will help entrepreneurs present and implement their ideas more effectively. “In our own countries, it is harder to start a company to go from an idea to a concrete body, not just because of the social conditions, but because of all the resources regarding education, regulations and access to financial support,” Yelmini said. “The struggles of everyone telling us we aren’t going to make it is another big difficulty for us entrepreneurs. People here are more used to seeing new businesses grow,” Pacheco added.John Paul Arvelo, president of Servicios de Seguridad y Resguardo, said while his society is losing hope, entrepreneurs are trying to solve the country’s issues.“My initiative is about providing protection services to companies, houses and individual people. I’m trying to build an awareness in people, to teach them how to apply law and save their lives,” Arvelo said. Germán Santillan Ugarte is the CEO and Founder of Oaxacanita Chocolate, a company which strives for the economic development of the Oaxacan Mixteca by hiring artisan cooks and palm craftsmen and by using local raw materials. He learns how to improve workers’ efficiency by using machines and skills here in South Bend, Ugarte said. “We all feel very welcomed here at Notre Dame,” Ugarte said. “The day when I arrived, there was a little note saying ‘Welcome home, Germán.’ It turned out that all the stereotypes about Americans are not true because all the professors and students are so nice.”Tags: Institute of Global Development, State Department, YLAIlast_img read more

Read More →

Students comment on Blinkie schedule change

first_imgRiding on Blinkie is a time-honored tradition for Saint Mary’s students. The dark blue van with an eponymous orange blinking light on top runs on campus from dark until 2 a.m. each day, taking students to their various on-campus destinations, such as residence halls and the library when they might not want to walk alone. Blinkie’s route includes the Grotto after The Sweep stops for the night. Stops at the Grotto also occur on the weekends, when “The Sweep” does not run. Tom Naatz | The Observer Students wait for Blinkie to pick them up from the bus stop at the corner of Holy Cross Drive and Saint Mary’s Road Thursday night. It was recently announced that Blinkie will begin running on the weekends.In an email sent to the Saint Mary’s student body Oct. 27, vice president for student affairs Karen Johnson said Blinkie service would begin at noon on Saturdays and Sundays, making its usual route on campus before going to the Grotto at Notre Dame. According to the email, the route should take about 45 minutes.Last year, Blinkie made trips to the Grotto on Sunday afternoons from fall break to spring break.Sunday Blinkie service was funded by the Student Government Association (SGA) last year. Since The Sweep no longer runs on Saturdays, transportation between Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame, an additional day of the service was added for this year.In a subsequent email, Johnson said the service was utilized by many students last year. SGA will once again be paying for this service, she said.Freshman Madi Holdsworth said she and her friends ride in Blinkie every weekend and at least one time during most weeks.“We love Blinkie,” Holdsworth said. “It’s a great idea.”She said she sometimes walks to Notre Dame on Sundays for Mass but would not be affected much by the Sunday service because it begins later than she would leave Saint Mary’s to attend Mass.Because of its service to the Grotto, Blinkie affects more than just Saint Mary’s students. Without the Transpo Midnight Express running on Friday and Saturday nights, the van is the only free transportation between Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s.Notre Dame junior Spencer Buzdon said he’s taken Blinkie numerous times over the past several years and has noticed a change in the experience of the ride.“Now that they’ve cancelled the Midnight Express, I feel like Blinkie has been a lot more crowded and difficult to use,” Buzdon said. “I think it’s even a matter of safety.”Every time he has ridden in the van this year, someone has been forced to stand, he said. Sometimes Buzdon himself stands in the trunk.“This year, I’ve found that Blinkie is really trying to pick up the slack that has been left by the Midnight Express, and it’s not equipped to do that job,” Buzdon said.Saint Mary’s students have also noticed a crowded van on Friday and Saturday nights.“I don’t take [Blinkie] often, but there’s only been one time this year that I wasn’t standing in the trunk,” junior Brynne Volpe said.While current freshmen did not have the opportunity to utilize the Midnight Express, they have also reported that the van is occasionally uncomfortable and crowded.“There was a time the first weekend that [my friends and I] were on Blinkie, and there were people on top of each other and in the trunk,” freshman Elena Sarmiento said. “In the trunk, people would just stand and pack together.”Since then, Sarmiento said she has seen large crowds late on weekend nights.Despite these challenges, Johnson said the number of riders on Blinkie has not changed significantly.“Our Saturday and Sunday late night usage was busy for the first two weeks of classes,” Johnson said. “It has, however, leveled out to usage similar to last year.”Even when the van is crowded, students feel a sense of safety and community when they take advantage of the Blinkie service“You know when someone who’s not from Saint Mary’s is getting on Blinkie, and you know the drivers, too,” freshman Fiona Connelly said.She said the Blinkie drivers are always kind to student riders.“They’re so nice,” she said. “There was one time when someone felt sick, and [the driver] gave her a recycling bin.”Holdsworth said a driver once gave her a cough drop when she was coughing during a ride. Connelly praised the drivers for their attention to their riders.“The drivers are very chill, very nice and very thoughtful,” Connelly said.Tags: blinkie, Midnight Express, saint mary’s, transportlast_img read more

Read More →

Fugitive located in Beaumont

first_img The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office received a call from a Crimestoppers tipster reporting that fugitive Willie Nash was at a location in Beaumont. Deputies from the Jefferson County Warrant Division responded to the area that the tipster advised he could be located. The fugitive was placed under arrest for Indecency with a Child without incident, according to Deputy Rod Carroll with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office.“The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the community for their assistance in locating this fugitive,” Carroll said via e-mail. “Mr. Nash was booked into the Jefferson County Correctional Facility. His bond has been set at $10,000.” A Crimestoppers tip led to the apprehension and arrest of a wanted felon hours after the alert was announced.last_img read more

Read More →

Pedestrian killed in early-morning crash in Orange County

first_img Next UpSgt. Stephanie Davis, Department of Public Safety, said the wreck occurred around 4 a.m. near Dailey Road.In an issued statement, DPS said initial reports say a Toyota Tundra pickup truck was traveling southbound on Highway 62 and was in collision with a pedestrian who was walking southbound near the roadway. Troopers continued to investigate Tuesday morning. Justice of the Peace Hershel Stagner pronounced the pedestrian dead at the scene. Troopers were working to positively identify the deceased victim Tuesday morning.The driver, a 28-year-old male from Lumberton, was not injured, DPS said.center_img Staff reportA pedestrian was killed early Tuesday in a single-vehicle collision on Highway 62 in Orange County.last_img read more

Read More →

PA woman shot multiple times by estranged boyfriend

first_imgA Port Arthur woman was shot multiple times, reportedly by her estranged boyfriend, shortly after midnight Thursday. The shooting happened in the 2400 block of Julian Drive, according to a press release from the Port Arthur Police Department.The victim was transported to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Beaumont with serious injuries.PAPD’s Criminal Investigations Division is handling the case.This is a developing story. Check back as more information becomes available.last_img

Read More →

OUT IN THE YARD — Companion planting in spring vegetable gardens

first_img Reach Jefferson County Master Gardener, Melissa Starr, at melynstarr@hotmail.com or call the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension at (409) 835-8461. Spring is around the corner. Birds are singing, and buds are ready to burst out of their dormant tree limbs and into the warm, sunlit spring air. Gardeners of all ages are dreaming of warm, flower-scented days and planning spring vegetable gardens.One key to overcoming soil-born pests and diseases is crop rotation. Remember where you planted each vegetable last year. If you have forgotten, get out some paper and write it down this year. Never plant the same vegetable (or family of vegetables) in the same place two years in a row. For example, potatoes, tomatoes and peppers are all in the nightshade family. Make sure you don’t plant any of these three vegetables in the same spot two years in a row.Another important step is to plant vegetable varieties that grow well in our area. For a list, visit the vegetable variety link on the Jefferson County Master Gardener web page (http://txmg.org/jcmg) or call the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension office at 409-835-8461. None of these methods are 100% effective, but, but with a little research and planning, these methods can decrease the amount of insecticides used in the garden.Start planning now, because soon the weather will heat up and your dreams of planting vegetables will either come true or melt away under scorching summer sun.center_img An additional way to increase plant growth and reduce pests is to practice companion planting. The theory of companion planting suggests that plants excrete certain natural chemicals that promote vigorous growth in some plants while inhibiting growth in others. Planting Swiss chard among potatoes will stunt the growth of both plants while planting tomatoes with carrots, onions, or basil should produce higher yields and added growth.Since pesky insects find their favorite plants by smell. Make it more difficult for them to find their dinner by mixing your garden crops with their appropriate companions. For example, dill and marigolds are said to repel some tomato hornworms, while basil and marigolds are said to repel some whiteflies. Also, allowing pumpkin or squash vines to grow under your corn will help deter raccoons and act as a natural mulch to keep the soil cool.Mixing flowers, herbs, and vegetables in the garden also will attract bees and other beneficial insects. Bees are necessary to pollinate many vegetable blossoms, and beneficial insects such as ladybugs, lacewing and assassin bugs eat or kill insects that are harmful to vegetables. Plant bee balm, dill, sunflowers, basil, daisies, or chives to attract these insects.last_img read more

Read More →

ASK A COP — Has COVID-19 caused a vehicle registration sticker shortage?

first_img Racheal from Port Arthur asks: I believe my cousin is very negligent when it comes to her vehicle maintenance. She is currently riding around with two donut tires on her car. I told her I didn’t think that was legal. Is it illegal to drive a car with more than one spare tire? Answer: A donut spare tire should not be driven more than 70 miles or faster than 50 mph. Any speed or distance past that, the tire is not guaranteed for safe driving on our roads. I did not find any or do not know of any law that regulates how many spare tires a motorist can have on any one vehicle. Your cousin needs to keep in mind, even though riding on two spare tires may not be illegal, it’s not the safest means of transportation. That donut spare tire is only temporary solution.Join Officer Rickey Antoine for Ask A Cop Live on KSAP 96.9 FM “The Breeze” every Tuesday from 1 to 2:30 p.m. as he discusses the Ask A Cop article. Ask your question live at 409-982-0247. Remember to email questions to Rickey.Antoine@portarthurtx.gov, call 409-983-8673 and leave a message or mail them to: Ofc. Rickey Antoine, 645 4th Street, Port Arthur, Texas, 77640. If you happen to see me in public, you can Ask A Cop! Dale from Port Neches asks: Is there a law in Texas regarding following too close to a police vehicle when it’s operating with its lights on?Answer: Who and why would someone want to follow a police unit that’s operating in emergency mode with its light and siren on? Most people want to get out of the way, breathe a sigh of relief and are grateful that police unit wasn’t trying to stop them! Dale, there’s no law in the Texas Transportation Code that specifically addresses following to close to a police unit operating in emergency mode, but there’s a law that prohibits following too close to a fire apparatus or ambulance. Texas Transportation Code 545.407 states a driver may not follow a fire apparatus or ambulance closer than 500 feet when they have their emergency lights activated. Chances are if a police unit is operating in emergency mode (lights and siren), they are legally traveling above the posted speed limit. If you’re following the police unit you’re most likely SPEEDING! Once again, police units are omitted from this law probably because police units don’t have a problem with motorists wanting to follow.center_img MJ from Port Arthur asks: My truck registration is due to expire at the end of September, and I’ve already received my renewal notice. I’m hearing that even after being inspected, I won’t be able to acquire a new registration sticker for my truck’s windshield because they’re in short supply due to the coronavirus. If this is true, what’s to prevent me from being cited for an expired registration even though the truck was inspected, but no replacement could be obtained?Answer: The worldwide Pandemic COVID-19 has readjusted just about all aspects of our lives, and the vehicle registration process in the state of Texas was not immune to said adjustment. MJ, I have good news for you, apparently that was a void rumor about Texas being short on registration stickers because of COVID-19. You can also get your registration sticker by mailing your registration back in, online or you can stop in local places to get your sticker since you have your vehicle inspected already and you’re not 30 days past your expiration date.last_img read more

Read More →