Mothers’ comments linked to eating disorders in Asian young adults

first_imgPinterest Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share The first study to look at the influence of Asian parents on their young adult child’s body dissatisfaction levels and disordered eating in Singapore has found significant differences with Western culture, leading to calls for a tailored approach to treatment.The study was carried out by a research collaboration between the University of Exeter Medical School, James Cook University, Singapore and the Australian National University. It found that negative comments made by mothers had more impact on their children’s self-image regardless of gender, in a culture where fathers are more authoritative and mothers more nurturing than in the West. This differs from Western studies in which comments made by mothers were more likely to influence daughters and fathers had more impact on sons.The research, partially funded by the Singapore Children’s Society and published in the journal Body Image, comes against a backdrop of growing numbers of children developing eating disorders in the island nation, with figures now on a par with the UK. Although most prevalent in girls, a growing number of boys are being diagnosed with eating disorders. Currently, the Western approach to treatment is adopted in Singapore and across Asia. However, researchers argue that cultural differences mean that a more tailored approach is needed to educate parents and to treat young Asian people effectively.center_img LinkedIn Email The research team assessed questionnaire responses from 383 young adults, of whom 69 per cent were female. They looked at the impact of parental comments in relation to body weight, shape and eating habits.Lead author Samuel Chng, a PhD student at the University of Exeter Medical School who is from Singapore, said more research was now needed to stop the problem spiraling further. He said: “Cultural family values are very different between Asia and the West, yet countries like Singapore have adopted Western strategies to this growing problem. In order for young people to get the best support and for health services to achieve value for money, more research is needed in this area to develop the best approach.”Co-author Dr Daniel Fassnacht, at Australian National University, said: “In Singapore, negative parental comments on their child’s weight and shape were linked to greater body dissatisfaction and disordered eating. It is crucial to educate parents about the pervasive influence their negative comments have on their child’s eating behaviour.”A spokesman for Singapore Children’s Society said: “”Singapore Children’s Society offer research grants that support a range of graduate and undergraduate research relevant to better understanding the welfare of children and their families in Singapore. Having supported the earliest phase of Samuel Chng’s research, we are pleased that it has now been published and congratulate the author.”last_img read more

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Obituary: Samuel Robert Skaggs June 23, 1936 – Feb. 20, 2020

first_imgSAMUEL ROBERT SKAGGS  June 23, 1936 – Feb. 20, 2020On February 20, 2020, Dr. Samuel Robert Skaggs completed his 83.66 trips around the sun and passed away.He was born in Philipsburg, PA on June 23, 1936 to Samuel Ralph and Martha Amelia Montes Skaggs.He was preceded in death by his parents and brother Richard Skaggs. Bob (Bobby, Robert, Dad, Opa) is survived by his loving wife of 62 years, Barbara Jan Hurley Skaggs of Nambe, NM, and his sister Mary Jean Fields of Dallas, TX.He is also survived by five children, Rusty (Rebecca) Skaggs of Bolivar, MO, Cheryl (Steve) Buckel of Bremerton, WA, Mike (Stephanie) Skaggs of Albuquerque, NM, Terry (Glen) Lockwood of Phoenix, AZ, Kathy (Larry) Brooks of Los Alamos, NM, and adopted son Mark (Wilma) Stevens of Las Cruces, NM, as well as 17 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren (1 deceased).He was a military veteran, U.S. Army Reserve, Captain. Bob enjoyed a very accomplished career with a PhD in Material Science specializing in high temperature ceramics. He retired from Los Alamos National Laboratory after 33 years. Throughout his career, Bob encouraged and mentored many people to realize their potential to become the best they could be.He was a founding member of the New Mexico State University Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Academy and served as a volunteer professor and student advisor until the end of his life. He also taught engineering at the University of New Mexico Los Alamos.Bob loved to share with friends and family, outdoor activities, reading and learning. He enjoyed travel and adventure, good conversation, excellent wine, and delicious food, especially lemon meringue pie and ice cream! Bob was also a generous volunteer of his time and abilities. He was an amateur radio operator, fire department volunteer, and beekeeper among many other pursuits in his spare time. He was a New Mexico search and rescue coordinator, National Ski Patroller, and American Red Cross instructor.24 years ago, Bob received a lifesaving donation of a kidney due to polycystic kidney disease. He followed a meticulous lifestyle to maintain his health which allowed him to spend these years with family and friends. A large part of his health regimen was a daily mile swim (over 100 miles a year). He was a transplant athlete and represented Team New Mexico and U.S. Transplant teams at various national and international games around the world winning 70 medals over the 24 year period (39 golds, 22 silvers, and 9 bronze medals).Bob was proud of his family legacy. He shared his last precious days with his true love, Barbara and all of his children. A few days before he passed, his family held an in-person Irish wake. Most of his large family with several close friends and neighbors met at his house to share how they were inspired by him and to celebrate his life in an event at which he was fully present and engaged.Bob’s family offers special gratitude to the many CareSource caregivers, Presbyterian Home Healthcare and Hospice, and the Christus St. Vincent providers and caregivers that extended him much care and comfort.Memorial donations in Bob’s name can be made to Donate Life America (and/or become an organ donor at donatelife.net) or to the LANL Foundation (lanlfoundation.org) to support education in northern New Mexico.Services and reception will be held at Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe de Valle de Pojoaque Church.  Services include Rosary March 5 at 6:00p.m. and Funeral Mass March 6 at 10:00a.m. with a reception in the parish hall directly following the mass. A memorial will also be held at the Pajarito Ski Area near Los Alamos on June 20, 2020.last_img read more

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SAFE In The Harbor

first_imgWhen SAFE in Sag Harbor’s Project Coordinator Danielle Laibowitz chose purple as the color of the organization’s swag bag, there was no other meaning behind it other than she was tired of blue and red, and just liked the color purple.But the color could not have been more fitting for the bags when they were handed out during the organization’s drug take back day at the Sag Harbor Fire Department on Friday, August 31 — International Overdose Awareness Day. Purple, which symbolizes mourning, is the official color of the day and Laibowitz was glad to use it to get the organization’s message out into the community.“It’s really all about prevention and using strategies that change the environment of the area. Taking the drugs out of the community changes the environment so that there are now less drugs in the community,” said Laibowitz, who arranged giveaways such as cellphone pop sockets, pens, and ice scrapers to spread the good word beyond the firehouse, in exchange for over-the-counter and prescription pain medications, some of them habit-forming opioid narcotics.About 20 pounds of drugs were collected during the last take back in October, Laibowitz said. And as of 1 PM on Friday, eight people had turned out to the firehouse to drop off their donations, bringing the organization’s efforts pretty close to that of the last take back.But this time, there were a few surprises. Some residents had donated hypodermic needles, although there were no plans to accept them. “I said, ‘no sharps,’” Laibowitz said. The collected drugs and hypodermic needles will be transported — via police escort — for incineration at Covanta Huntington LP, a waste disposal plant in East Northport.Last year, an estimated 190,000 people worldwide died prematurely from drug use, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. The United States alone counts for one in four of the world’s drug deaths, with roughly 64,000 people succumbing to drugs from January 2016 to January 2017, according to the Center For Disease Control.In 2017, the Town of Southampton experienced 19 deaths — the highest death toll from overdoses in its history. That, combined with the death of a young Sag Harbor girl, Hallie Rae Ulrich, and her boyfriend, Michael Goericke, within a day of each other provided the catalyst for the formation of the Southampton Town Opioid Task Force, which has since been replaced with a panel aimed at devising prevention and treatment programs within the town.The take back also has a less immediate purpose. It will reduce the amount of drugs that people flush down the toilet, an act which leads to groundwater contamination, according to Laibowitz.Suffolk County Legislator Bridget Fleming, who is a member of the Legislature’s Public Safety Committee, agreed the reason the drugs should be off the streets is two-fold. She said the first starts with keeping them “out of people’s homes, out of medicine chests, out of the hands of kids or people who have problems with addiction, because they can be abused.” Secondly, she explained, “In the olden days, people used to say, ‘Flush your unused medications down the toilet.’”“We know now that is really disastrous for the bays, creek, and harbors,” she said. “The thing to do is to be organized, get the word out, and then have responsible agencies like the police department take custody of them and dispose of them properly, so that they stay out of the hands of people that might abuse them and they stay out of the bays and harbors where they could do so much harm.”Assemblyman Fred Thiele agreed the drug take back is important for both public health and environmental reasons. “Take back programs are growing across the state and they are necessary for those reasons,” he added.SAFE in Sag Harbor, the acronym of which signifies “for a substance-abuse free environment,” currently has about 250 members, with about 20 to 30 of them active volunteers. However, Laibowitz said it is looking for more people to join and help out. The next meeting is at Pierson High School’s library on September 18 and there will be a talk, “Tall Cop says ‘Stop,’” by opioid prevention advocate Jermaine Galloway, a retired police officer who speaks all over the U.S., on October 9. He will speak at a yet-to-be-finalized venue in three sessions aimed at helping parents, educators, and law enforcement identify the drug paraphernalia and hiding spots used by teenagers. For more information about the organization, visit www.safeinsagharbor.org.peggy@indyeastend.com Share Members of the community marked SAFE in Sag Harbor’s drug take back day at the Sag Harbor Fire Department. Independent/Peggy Spellman Hoeylast_img read more

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Historic Films Archived In Greenport

first_imgIndependent/Jules Cahn Collection c/o Historic Films ArchiveIt started with a love of music and a degree in film, and it led to a combination of both for Sag Harbor resident Joe Lauro, founder of Historic Films Archive, which has been headquartered in Greenport since 2006.“By nature, I’m a collector,” said Lauro, who is also the bassist for The Hoodoo Loungers. “It’s part of my being. I’ve collected 78 RPM records since I was 15, and I’ve always loved film. Those instincts on how you ferret out older things, and research to find elusive items from the past served me well with the archive we have, which is just about the largest commercial archive of American music on film in the world at this point.”After his stint at NYU film school, “I had to make a living,” he said. Like so many people, he did “this and that.” After working with another film archive company, managing it for seven years, Lauro decided to go it alone. “I went off and opened my own shop. And it’s fun for me,” he said. “When people need old music material, or old archival stuff, they come to us. It’s highly digitized, you can put in a keyword — it’s all state of the art.”Lauro’s partner in Historic Films is filmmaker Andrew Solt, who owns the rights to “The Ed Sullivan Show” library. “Don Kirschner, the legendary producer, put us together.” The company also has the rights for the famed Pathe news, which usually played in movie theaters before the main features from the early part of the 20th Century until 1970.Lauro waxes about the “constant joy of discovery” he still experiences after over 20 years in business, and the new clips that never fail to evoke an emotional response in him.“A recent ‘Eureka’ moment was this amazing footage that was shot by a fellow named Jules Cahn, a man from New Orleans, who documented all the jazz parades, and all the black culture of New Orleans in the 1950s and ’60s,” Lauro said. His company represents the footage. “It’s all in color, and we’ve had it transferred into 2K. That, in and of itself, would be amazing on its own,” he said.Independent/Jules Cahn Collection c/o Historic Films ArchiveBut wait, there’s more.“But within that, I found some color footage of the March on Washington, which is very unusual,” Lauro said. The march, which took place in the late summer of 1963, was held to advance the Civil Rights Act, and culminated with Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I Have A Dream” speech.“You see black and white all the time,” Lauro said. “But we have this 20-minute roll of all of these intimate moments, beautifully shot. I’ve never seen this — there were tents set up, where they were giving out things to people, it’s just beautiful. We only discovered this two months ago, and we’ve used it three or four times already.”The documentary film industry is one that is not as affected as other arts during this time of the pandemic. “It’s a lot of research,” Lauro said, “and there’s a lot of documentaries being done. All these ‘in the editing room’ projects are continuing on with a vengeance,” he said. “It’s exploding, because everyone is looking online for something to do. Any films that people can do at home, that’s what is happening now.”In his own documentary project on the Newport Folk Festival — which featured Pete Seeger, Bob Dylan, and other folk heroes in the early ’60s — Lauro is sending microphones to the festival’s participants to record audio, but plans to show them “when they were still young and beautiful,” he said with a smile.For more information about the film available, or just to browse, the Historic Films Archive website is www.historicfilms.com.bridget@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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A long, hard look

first_imgThe tragedy that unfolded on 14 June at Grenfell Tower is likely to have far-reaching ramifications for both the housing and construction sectors.There are two levels of debate that arise here. Firstly, the wider political implications of failure in broader housing policy and regulation; and secondly, the actions of the construction industry.Head of the upcoming public inquiry, Sir Martin Moore-Bick, has already stated that he will concentrate on the facts surrounding the Grenfell Tower fire, and not address wider policy. But there must have been a major failure within the end-to-end process of regulating, designing, procuring, constructing and managing housing stock. Whether it has been contributed to by the construction industry’s own delivery failings will become clear. But confusion over cladding testing is already perpetuating the feeling that some of our most important industry standards are indeterminate, lack transparency and appear open to gamification or playing the system.Recently, there has been a significant negative shift in public perception of the housing industry beyond the world of social housing. The growing sense that there is inequality in the housing market, now amplified by Grenfell Tower, is reinforced by stories of developers exploiting a system that looks increasingly flawed. Increasing reliance on individual investors buying units has further muddied the waters, leading to accusations that developers are busy building safe deposit boxes and pension plans instead of decent accommodation.The build-to-rent sector has not escaped criticism either, with some permitted development conversion schemes for rent being labelled poor quality, while some premium rental products are accused of being unaffordable and unaligned to real market need.Let’s not forget the discontent brewing that Help to Buy is seen to have become a structural subsidy for the larger housebuilders’ profits.Meanwhile, in the public sector, as registered providers seek to reduce reliance on declining government grants and local authorities look to create income, their transition to quasi-private sector business models has led some to question their core social purpose.Whether any of these observations are justified is of course open to extensive and emotive debate but increasingly negative public perception is now becoming the residential development industry’s reality. The homebuilding sector fundamentally needs to be building more genuinely affordable, high-quality homes more quickly in the right places across a variety of tenures. This is the crux of our so-called market failure conundrum. And something must be done about it.The simple answer to all of this has to be led by policy and regulation. Without pre-empting specifics, the Grenfell Tower disaster is highly likely to lead to a tightening of regulations and an increase in both public and private sector clients’ awareness of potential reputational, statutory and indeed criminal risk in not demanding the very best standards of construction and specifying and procuring accordingly. This will put further pressure on existing skills, unfortunately, and will potentially reduce available supply chain capacity through “raising the bar”.If there has ever been a moment to step up efforts to invest and innovate in how we organise and deliver, surely this is it?The land market also lies at the heart of housing supply and affordability problems and there is a growing cross-party consensus on the problem of land value speculation. Any intervention here of course brings with it the risk of unintended consequences but the call for action is growing.But it’s not just up to the government. If there has ever been a moment to step up efforts to invest and innovate in how we organise and deliver, ruthlessly pursuing the attainment of better quality, efficiency and safety, surely this is it? We need improved skills and training, embracing increasing use of technology and more high quality, accredited pre-manufacturing solutions, all supported by a better integrated delivery model. This is the only way we will consistently deliver a better standard at the higher levels of housing output that we desperately need in this country.All of this ultimately needs to be paid for out of improved productivity, not by reducing supply chain margins or by charging clients more. Major businesses spanning clients, contractors, consultants and suppliers need to urgently think about how they can demonstrate pre-emptive leadership here that the willing and responsible part of the rest of the industry can then follow.And finally, if the need for this industry to improve its standards wasn’t clear enough, consider the fact that we continue to kill people in the process of building the very things that are being accused of now being unsafe. Just one week after the Grenfell disaster, two people were killed on a construction site in Crewe. Our industry fatalities amount to the cumulative equivalent of the current official Grenfell Tower death toll of 80, every two to three years.No doubt many will read this article and immediately move onto their day-to-day business, assuming the challenge I set out here is someone else’s problem. That attitude is one that has characterised our past. We need a different future – one that uses the awful events at Grenfell Tower as an unprecedented collective impetus for change.Mark Farmer is founding director and chief executive at consultant Cast and author of the industry report Modernise or Dielast_img read more

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The challenge of spending wisely

first_imgThe European Union is making €14bn available for the new member states in Central and Eastern Europe to invest in rail up to 2013. With no comprehensive development plan to take advantage of this largesse, governments and railways need to take urgent action if the rail sector is to be revitalised effectively,IN THE SEVEN YEARS to 2013 the European Union has made no less than €14bn available to spend on the rail sector in the member states that have joined the EU since 2004.Forming part of the Cohesion Policy for new member states, this funding covers the seven-year programme period that began on January 1. For a comparison of the scale, just €7bn has been made available in the budget for the Trans-European Transport Network programme across the 15 old member states. Here the governments and railways are eager to obtain a slice of the funds. But disbursing €14bn across the 10 new states with rail networks poses a major challenge to the European Commission, to the governments and to the railway companies involved. The Commission thinks it is worth it. In the former centrally-planned economies of Central and Eastern Europe rail transport had a market share of about 45%. After years of decline, even today that share is still greater than 30% – double that achieved in Western Europe (Fig 1). Restoring this high market share, or at least preventing further decline, is a crucial element of EU policy. Greater use of rail is seen as essential to meet the goal of sustainable and efficient transport. Historically, rail’s important role in the CEE region supported an economic structure where the emphasis lay on heavy industry. At the same time, private car ownership was restricted. The huge rail freight and passenger volumes generated sufficient revenues to fund the maintenance of railway assets, and at the same time it was possible to use part of the freight revenues to subsidise passenger transport. During the 1960s and 1970s many governments invested heavily in their national railways and, remarkably, most railways were not dependent on operating subsidies from the state budget. The situation changed dramatically after 1990, as both rail freight and passenger volumes halved. The decline of heavy industries and a rapid increase in ownership of private cars and lorries meant that the railways could no longer cover their operating costs from revenues. It became necessary for the states to restructure their railways and contribute financial support, but many governments were either unable or unwilling to make up the shortfall. Fig 2 shows that the financial contribution to the rail sector by governments in the new member states remains low when compared to western Europe. EU benefits and obligations Membership of the EU was expected to bring strong and stable economic growth to the new member states. In fact, economic growth in the region is well above the EU average. Accession required the new states to make a significant contribution to the EU budget, but in return, through the Cohesion Policy, they receive strong financial support to stimulate their economies and integrate them into the Union. Thanks to EU support and funding from national budgets, investment in transport infrastructure in the new member states represents at least 0·8% of GDP, which is the average for the whole EU. Preliminary estimates indicate that in 2007-13 transport infrastructure investment in Poland and Bulgaria will be around 0·8% to 1% of GNP, and in the Czech Republic and Hungary between 1·5% and 2%. However, this is still relatively low in relation to World Bank recommendations. The Bank’s transport sector review notes that public investment in transport typically accounts for 2% to 2·5% of GDP, rising to 3·5% in countries where significant infrastructure modernisation is in hand. The legal framework EU membership is not just about money there is a legal framework too. EU policy is based on liberalisation of the rail sector and transforming the state-run railways into ‘normal’ businesses. To this effect the EU has developed a legal framework designed to make it possible for companies to compete on equal terms. In particular, this framework requires governments to ensure that the rail sector in general is financially stable (Directive 91/440). Under Regulation 1191/69, governments must compensate companies for providing unremunerative public transport services by rail and other modes, while Directive 2001/12 requires governments to separate the responsibilities for railway infrastructure management from operations. Moreover, this framework imposes restrictions on state aid to companies, and obliges governments to ensure that operation of the rail network is financially balanced (Directive 2001/14). This last directive also covers the allocation of infrastructure capacity, levying of access fees and safety certification. Governments in the new member states were not directly involved in drawing up this legal framework, as it was prepared before they joined the EU. However, its implementation was a condition for entry. So it is no surprise that the Commission’s report on implementation of the First Railway Package published in May 2006 (RG 7.06 p371), found that the EU legal framework had been transposed into the legislation of the new states, but that it had not yet been adequately implemented. Either the governments had simply started later, they had less understanding of the framework, or possibly they were less motivated. Whatever the case, they were obliged to start allocating significant funds for the rail sector from their already stretched national budgets. No comprehensive plan During the pre-accession period, when governments in the CEE region were preparing the legal framework for their rail sectors, they received significant EU investment support to upgrade the corridors linking them with the rest of the EU. This support was disbursed by the EU at a time when plans for reform and development of the region’s rail sector were still in discussion. As the support was limited to trans-European corridors, the absence of a comprehensive development plan did not form a practical obstacle. However, the situation changed when the countries became member states. In 2006, when the allocation of funds for 2007-13 was being negotiated, the Commission underlined the need to give due priority to investment in sustainable transport. It also complained about the lack of a comprehensive development plan for the rail sector in the CEE region. At the same time CER stressed the need to establish financial stability in the region’s rail businesses, and called for the allocation of sufficient resources for modernisation. Both the Commission and CER warned the various governments against neglecting their railways and repeating the mistakes made by the EU15 in the 1960s. Revitalisation is essential The new states had the advantage of well-developed rail networks and a high modal share, but the overcapacity which followed the loss of traffic after 1990 quickly turned into a financial burden for their governments. The result was that railways in the CEE region entered a downward spiral. The shortfall in revenues had to be compensated in part by increasing fares and tariffs. But this made rail less attractive for customers, leading to the loss of more market share and a further fall in revenues. The vicious circle has to be broken, by finding a new balance between the level of state funding for the rail sector and pricing measures for other transport modes. Restructuring of the rail sector is essential to match capacity more closely to demand, which means reducing payrolls and possibly the size of some networks. Better productivity of staff and assets are essential ingredients of the formula. In short, the rail sector in the new member states needs to be revitalised, and the EU policy on sustainable transport, with its legal framework and funds for investment support, provides very favourable conditions for this to happen. Development plan Previous EU support for rail investment was largely based on selecting projects that were considered to be essential anyway. Priority went on schemes to connect the new states with the rest of the EU, but there was no overall vision of the future, let alone a comprehensive list of investment projects and a strategy for bringing them about. Rail remained uncertain about its role, and many railway businesses became financially unstable. Decisions on restructuring were postponed, and problems tended to be shunted to and fro between stakeholders, sometimes with acrimonious negotiations. All this led to long delays in starting work on the revitalisation that was so badly needed, and investment projects were held up. The sector still needs urgently a comprehensive development plan, which would greatly facilitate the preparation of investment projects and guide the disbursement of available EU funding over the next few years. Such a plan would show the impact of individual investment proposals on the overall policy for developing rail transport, and could help ensure that the various proposals are approved swiftly. Various governments and their railways are starting to think carefully about preparing development plans, and in some countries there seems to be a consensus on strategy and the level of funding needed, although nothing formal has been published. Others, however, continue to skirt around the hot issues where difficult decisions are needed. The challenge for the stakeholders is to decide jointly on the features of the rail network they will need in the future, and feed this into a development plan. This plan would also show if national transport policies reflect EU policy for the rail sector, giving it adequate competitive edge and making it financially stable. Specifically, the plan needs to indicate the capacity that rail services need to deliver and the level of funding needed for investment and operation. It should link decisions on technical parameters for national networks to the allocation of state funds for compensating the shortfall in revenues from track access charges, if such shortfalls are to be expected. Even though 2013 may seem a long way away, preparation, appraisal and execution of infrastructure projects is by no means quick and easy. Delays in project delivery over the next seven years could lead to budgets remaining unused in the EU accounts. Some new member states may not fully benefit from their allocated level of investment support, and at worst, some net recipients could turn into net contributors to the EU budget.To modernise its passenger fleet, Bulgarian operator BDZ has taken delivery of 25 Desiro diesel units from Siemens Fig 1. Rail’s share of the freight market has stabilised in the EU15 but continues to fall in the new member states Elderly locomotive-hauled trains still work suburban services around Budapest. Modern rolling stock will be essential if rail is to defend its traditionally healthy market share in Eastern Europe Fig 2. State contributions to rail funding in EU member states in 2004, measured as k per traffic unit (tonne-km + passenger-km) The decline in traffic volumes during the 1990s left many railways in Eastern Europe with surplus infrastructure in poor condition Rail’s market share of freight traffic in Eastern Europe continues at a high level despite the collapse of the former planned economiesRolling stock renewal needs a clear focus A substantial proportion the passenger fleet in the new member states is life-expired, but most railway undertakings can only afford to replace a proportion of their fleet. Without a proper development strategy, neither the government nor the railway will have a clear long-term vision as to how many trains will actually be needed or whether the investment will be financially justified. If there is a comprehensive development plan in place, the railway would negotiate a proper passenger service contract, setting out the required level of train-km, the forecast revenues and an agreed payment. Using this basic schedule, the railway operator can determine its rolling stock requirements and focus its investment priorities more accurately. It is easy to spot an unplanned project, which says that ‘Railway X will buy Y trainsets’, without demonstrating whether Y is the right number. A planned project would state that ‘Railway Z will provide services in Region A offering B train-km a year at an (upgraded) quality level C.’Le rail face aux défis des projets et des dépenses en Europe centrale et orientalePas moins de 14 milliards d’Euros jusqu’en 2013 sont disponibles pour l’investissement ferroviaire par les nouveaux états membres de l’Union européenne dans le cadre du Fond de cohésion, mais il n’y a pas de plan d’ensemble de développement pour tirer parti de cette largesse. Une action urgente des gouvernements et des chemins de fer est donc nécessaire si l’on veut que le secteur ferroviaire d’Europe centrale et orientale soit relancé. Ad Toet défend que les restructurations, les gains de productivité et des projets de développement forts sont les ingrédients essentiels d’une formule destinée à revigorer le monde ferroviaire et à avancer vers les objectifs de l’UE, objectifs d’efficacité et de transport dans le cadre du développement durablePlanungs- und Budget-Herausforderungen an die Bahnen in Mittel- und OsteuropaBis zu 14 Milliarden Euro aus dem Kohäsionsfonds stehen den neuen EU-Mitgliedsländern für Investitionen im Eisenbahnbereich bis 2013 zur Verfügung, aber es gibt keinen umfassenden Entwicklungsplan, welcher diese Grössenordnung zunutze macht. Dringende Massnahmen müssen daher von den Regierungen und den Bahnen ergriffen werden, wenn die Eisenbahn in Mittel- und Osteuropa revitalisiert werden soll. Ad Toet erklärt, dass Restrukturierung, Produktivitätsverbesserungen und ein starker Entwicklungsplan die Kernpunkte in der Formel sind zur Wiederbelebung der Eisenbahn und um den EU-Zielen von effizientem und nachhaltigem Verkehr zu entsprechenEl ferrocarril se enfrenta a desafíos logísticos y financieros en Europa Central y del Este Los nuevos miembros de la Unión Europea disponen de nada menos que 14 000 millones de euros procedentes de los fondos de cohesión para invertir en el sector ferroviario hasta 2013, pero no existe un plan global de desarrollo para aprovechar esta generosa cantidad. Por lo tanto, es necesario que el gobierno y los responsables del ferrocarril tomen medidas urgentes si quieren revitalizar el sector ferroviario en Europa Central y del Este. Ad Toet afirma que la reestructuración, las mejoras en la productividad y un plan de desarrollo sólido son factores esenciales para revitalizar el sector del ferrocarril y cumplir los objetivos de la UE relativos a un transporte eficaz y sosteniblelast_img read more

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Win tickets to attend an exclusive, intimate A Thousand Horses acoustic performance and Q&A

first_imgBefore they perform at C2C: Country to Country in London from 13th to 15th March, A Thousand Horses will be hosting an exclusive, intimate acoustic performance and Q&A in a top secret location in London.They’ll be playing the hits and previewing songs from their upcoming album, the follow-up to 2017 mini-album Bridges and their 2015 release Southernality.>Watch an acoustic performance of Drinking Song to get into the mood:Destination Country has 1 pair of tickets to this super exclusive and intimate event to give away to one lucky winner.To be in with a chance of being at the showcase, you need to head over to our Facebook, Instagram and Twitter profiles to find out how to enter.Read the full terms and conditions before entering.last_img read more

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South Africa’s Zuma won’t participate further in corruption inquiry

first_imgJacob Zuma’s son agrees to testify before South Africa’s graft inquiry panel Gupta-Zuma corruption inquiry begins in South Africa A lawyer for former South African president Jacob Zuma told a corruption inquiry on Friday that Zuma would not take part in the inquiry further because he felt that he was being questioned unfairly.“Chair, we are here today to say we will take no further part in these proceedings,” lawyer Muzi Sikhakhane told the inquiry. He said Zuma had been subject to “relentless cross-examination.”Related South Africa’s Zuma tells corruption inquiry there is conspiracy against him South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma reacts during a rally following the launch of a social housing project in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, April 1, 2017. REUTERS/Rogan Wardlast_img read more

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At least 15 killed in Sudan factory explosion: doctors’ union

first_imgPublic hospital doctors on strike in Sudan African Union criticises military takeover in Sudan Sudan Civil Defence members put out a fire after an explosion.Image Credit: AFPAt least 15 people were killed after an explosion occurred at a ceramic factory in Bahri City’s industrial zone, north of the Sudanese capital, Khartoum, on Tuesday, according to the Sudanese doctors union.The union said that several people were injured, a number of them critically. The injured are being treated for burns in local hospitals.Videos circulating online showed an explosion followed by dense black smoke rising into the air.Sudanese authorities are yet to release an official death toll from the incident.More to follow…Relatedcenter_img China Kunshan Factory Explosion last_img read more

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Damning Report Issued Into Closure Of North West Campus

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInA reporthas been issued by ‘Scottish Futures Trust’ about the sudden closure of a brand new multi million pound school campus in Dumfries due to safety issues in 2018, the report carried out by GLM states there was “confusion” over who was responsible for the quality of the work.The report titled ‘Root Cause Analysis’ of the closure North West Community CampusDumfries was carried out following the collapse of a ceiling during the construction phase in July 2018, and other incidents that occured whilst the school was in use and puplis were attending, the North West Community Campus in Dumfries was closed for seven months torectify a significant number of defects.GLM were  commissioned to carry out the root cause analysis intothree incidents that occured at the state of the art campus.• the collapse of the staff room ceiling prior to handover,• once possession (as defined in the Beneficial Access supplementary agreement) wastaken a sliding door which came from its runner, and• a Promethean smart screen which struck a child.The full report can be read HERE “The report exposes the fact that the whole model used by the Government to build schools is fundamentally broken with so many bodies involved but no one in charge, taken responsibility and it is the safety of pupils and staff who were put at risk as a result. It was clear that the council were misled by contractors and Government agencies and there now needs to be a fundamental review of the Government processes before these appalling failures are repeated in other parts of Scotland”. South Scotland MSP Colin Smyth said, “It is shocking that it has taken so long for this report to be made public. The appalling systematic failures it exposes show why the Government was so keen to keep the findings quiet and only release them the day Parliament goes into recess so no questions can be asked.” last_img read more

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