Avian Flu Scan for May 10, 2016

first_imgNovel avian flu subtype H3N6 found co-circulating with H3 and H5 virusesA novel avian flu subtype, H3N6, was found co-circulating with other viruses on duck farms in China’s Hunan province, according to a May 6 study in Scientific Reports.Researchers analyzed 10 avian flu strains isolated from domestic ducks, geese, and duck pond water from 2014 to 2015 on farms in Hunan’s Wugang city. Avian flu viruses H3N2, H3N8, and H5N6 were found co-circulating in domestic ducks, along with a new subtype, H3N6, which likely derived from H5N6. The new virus possesses a neuraminadase deletion that makes it unique compared with other H3 subtypes, the authors said.All four subtypes replicated efficiently in mammal cells, including Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells, though the H3 viruses grew to higher titers compared with H5N6 in the first 12 hours, followed by a drop in viral load 72 hours after infection. The viruses were also found to replicate well in adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial (A459) cells.The H3 viruses and H5N9 also demonstrated low pathogenicity in mice. H3N2 and H3N8 caused high viral titers in the lungs and nasal turbinates of infected mice, while H3N6 and H5N6 were able to replicate effectively only in the lungs. None of the four subtypes caused murine disease or death, the authors said.Given the occurrence of novel subtypes produced by gene reassortment of co-circulating avian flu viruses, the authors recommended improving biosecurity measures on Chinese poultry farms to reduce the possibility of avian flu outbreaks and interspecies transmission.May 6 Sci Rep study Researchers say genetic traits may influence human susceptibility to H7N9Chinese scientists have identified 64 human genetic peculiarities that they think may affect susceptibility to infection with the H7N9 avian flu virus, according to a report yesterday in  Scientific Reports.The authors hypothesized that genetic characteristics may influence both susceptibility to H7N9 infection and the severity of illness, since relatively few of the many people exposed to poultry during H7N9 outbreaks have contracted the infection.The team took blood samples from 18 confirmed H7N9 patients, 6 of whom had fatal cases. They extracted the DNA and sequenced the portions of it that encode proteins (exons). This led to the identification of 64 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 21 genes that were more common in the H7N9 patients than in the general population.”These mutations were found in genes encoding proteins responsible for multiple key host defense mechanisms, including cytokine production, airway epithelium barrier function and pathogen associated molecular pattern signaling pathway,” suggesting that the SNPs may affect susceptibility to H7N9, the report says.Some of the 21 genes have previously been identified as linked to H7N9 susceptibility, the authors said. For example, an earlier study indicated that dysfunction of a gene called IFITM3 is associated with increased cytokine production during H7N9 infection and is correlated with mortality.The team acknowledged that their sample was small and that the findings need to be confirmed by further studies, which they are working on.”Further investigations into the function of these genes in host susceptibility may help identify individuals who are at high risk for infection,” they concluded. “In addition, translational research into the function of the genes identified in this study may provide new potential therapeutic targets for influenza virus infection.”May 9 Sci Rep articlelast_img read more

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Obituary: Adeline (Addy) F. Reeves Jan. 20, 1927 – Sept. 7, 2019

first_imgADELINE (ADDY) F. REEVES Jan. 20, 1927 – Sept. 7, 2019Adeline (Addy) F. Reeves passed away on September 7th in her home with family around her.Addy was born in Oakdale, NE, on January 20th, 1927 to Herman and Lena Walters and was raised on their family farm with her four siblings. She graduated from Oakdale High School, hopped the train to Omaha with her older sister, Millie, got a room at a boarding house, and landed a job as a secretary. She soon met Frank, her husband of 62 years, who was a recent enlistee in the U.S. Navy. During their courtship Frank said, “for 2 cents I would marry you” and Mom pulled out 2 cents – and that was that! They were married on January 13, 1947 in Manhattan, Kansas.Frank’s 20+ years in the Navy took them from coast to coast. They had eight children along the way: Robert Reeves (Nancy), both deceased, from California, Patricia Day (John) from South Carolina, Frank Reeves, Jr (Margaret) from New Mexico, Teresa Reeves-Long (Kevin) from Missouri, Rick Reeves (Jill) from Georgia, Jeff Reeves from Missouri, JoAnn Abbott (Matt) from Virginia, and Kristi Reeves (Rudd) from Colorado. Besides her children she is also survived by sixteen grandchildren; Jennifer, Christopher, Heather, Genna, Kate, Mary, Jessica, Lindsie, Matt Jr, Gretchen, Samantha, Melia, Grace, Kenya, Thorin, and Mollie); and six great-grandchildren; Evan, Alisa, Desmond, Riley, Opal and John.Frank retired from the Navy in 1965, and they moved to Los Alamos, NM for his second career with the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Summers and family vacations were spent traveling in a succession of tents, trailers and motor homes until Frank’s illness in 2007. The many family camping trips in New Mexico and throughout the western US, Canada, and Mexico instilled in her family a love of the outdoors, a can-do attitude, independence, and a resilience that continues to guide all of their children.After retiring from LANL in 1981, Addy and Frank began their next big adventure; purchasing 43 acres near Ava, Missouri, building a home, growing lots of vegetables, and continuing to travel with many newfound friends in the RV clubs to which they belonged. She tolerated all of the critters we brought, bought and rescued; most of the time taking care of them long after we lost interest. She was a crafter extraordinaire. Over the years she baked and decorated elaborate birthday and graduation cakes, created beautiful quilts, crocheted complex tablecloths, wove beautiful Ojo de Dios, sewed clothes for all of her children and their dolls. She was always ready for a game of badminton, horseshoes, softball, and pinochle – or a rousing game of poker (which she usually won). She was an amazing cook – creating recipes to feed a family of ten on a shoestring budget. Mom loved music and dancing of all sorts, from polka to waltzing to square dancing. She encouraged (and suffered through) various clarinet, flute, trumpet, guitar, and piano lessons, and greatly enjoyed her kids, grandkids and great grandkids singing and playing musical instruments to her, but frequently lamented that she couldn’t carry a tune herself. We will miss her brilliant smile, her sometimes surprising sense of humor, and her indomitable spirit.Frank founded the LST49 Club in 1982, bringing together a group of sailors who served together during World War II aboard the Naval ship of that name, and Addy continued to attend their annual reunions and served as secretary until 2016, when most of the guys had either passed away, or could no longer attend. Frank and Addy were both very active members of St. Leo’s Catholic Church in Ava. She continued to volunteer at the church and at the Heart of the Hills Thrift Store into her 90s. She leaves behind a legacy of love and service to both organizations an indelible legacy in her kids. Our mom was deeply admired and truly loved by so many in her many and varied circles.  Most people are lucky to have moments of true grace in their lives … our mom provided a lifetime of grace.After Frank died in 2008, Mom continued to live on their farm; gardening, crafting, and enjoying her little rural piece of heaven until the end; thanks entirely to the physical assistance and compassionate care of our brother, Jeff, to whom we are all incredibly grateful. Dad was the sailor in the family, but Mom has always been our anchor. She lived a long and happy life.In lieu of flowers, a donation to the Audubon Society of Missouri, St. Leo’s Catholic Church, or the Heart of the Hills Thrift Store, Ava, Missouri may be made in Mom’s name.A memorial service is planned for October 12th at St Leo’s Catholic Church in Ava, Missouri.last_img read more

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Daily Postcard: Cirrus Fibratus Clouds Spotted Saturday

first_imgDaily Postcard: Cirrus fibratus clouds are spotted wisping across the sky Saturday morning on the way down the hill from Los Alamos, near Pojoaque High School. Cirrus clouds often produce hair-like filaments—similar to the virga produced in liquid–water clouds—called fall streaks, and are made of heavier ice crystals that fall from the cloud. The sizes and shapes of fall streaks are determined by the wind shear. Photo by Nancy Ann Hibbs Cirrus fibratus clouds spotted in the sky Saturday morning on the way down the hill from Los Alamos. Photo by Nancy Ann Hibbslast_img read more

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New Mexico COVID-19 Cases Now At 5,212 With 11 New Deaths And 1,434 Patients Recovered

first_imgSTATE News:SANTA FE – New Mexico state health officials have announced this afternoon 143 additional positive tests for COVID-19.Los Alamos County remains at 6 cases that have tested positive for COVID-19.Today’s update includes 11 additional deaths reported in New Mexico related to COVID-19. Per the New Mexico Department of Health reported today the most recent cases: 25 new cases in Bernalillo County1 new case in Chaves County3 new cases in Cibola County1 new case in Curry County14 new cases in Doña Ana County2 new cases in Guadalupe County43 new cases in McKinley County1 new case in Quay County1 new case in Roosevelt County7 new cases in Sandoval County42 new cases in San Juan County1 new case in Taos County1 new case at the ICE Otero County Processing Center1 new case at the ICE Torrance County Detention FacilityThe 11 additional deaths in New Mexico reported today include:A male in his 70s from Bernalillo County. The individual was hospitalized and was a resident of the Village at Alameda in Albuquerque.A female in her 90s from Bernalillo County. The individual had underlying medical conditions and was a patient at the Canyon Transitional Rehabilitation Center.A male in his 50s from McKinley County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying medical conditions.A female in her 60s from McKinley County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying medical conditions.A male in his 60s from McKinley County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying medical conditions.A female in her 70s from McKinley County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying medical conditions.A male in his 90s from McKinley County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying medical conditions. The individual was a resident of the Red Rocks Care Center in Gallup.A male in his 40s from San Juan County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying medical conditions.A male in his 70s from San Juan County. The individual was hospitalized.A female in her 80s from San Juan County. The individual was a resident of the Cedar Ridge Inn facility in Farmington.A female in her 50s from Santa Fe County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying medical conditions. The individual was a resident of the Uptown Genesis facility in Albuquerque.  The number of deaths of New Mexico residents related to COVID-19 is now 219.Including the above newly reported cases, New Mexico has now had a total of 5,212 positive tests for COVID-19:Bernalillo County: 1,111Catron County: 2Chaves County: 28Cibola County: 89Colfax County: 5Curry County: 32Doña Ana County: 245Eddy County: 14Grant County: 15Guadalupe County: 17Harding County: 1Lea County: 15Lincoln County: 2Los Alamos County: 6Luna County: 8McKinley County: 1,628Otero County: 9Quay County: 5Rio Arriba County: 28Roosevelt County: 12Sandoval County: 474San Juan County: 1,149San Miguel County: 7Santa Fe County: 112Sierra County: 1Socorro County: 49Taos County: 21Torrance County: 18Union County: 3Valencia County: 57The Department of Health currently reports 31 COVID-19 cases among individuals being held at the federal Otero County Processing Center run by ICE in Otero County and 1 COVID-19 case among individuals being held at the federal Torrance County Detention Facility run by ICE in Torrance County.The Department of Health currently reports 17 COVID-19 cases among individuals being held at the federal Otero County Prison Facility run by ICE and the U.S. Marshals Service. Due to a reporting error, these cases were previously accounted for within the total case counts for Otero and Doña Ana counties – moving forward they will be reported separately for clarity.County totals are subject to change upon further investigation and determination of residency of individuals positive for COVID-19.As of today, there are 199 individuals hospitalized in New Mexico for COVID-19. This number may include individuals who tested positive for COVID-19 out of state but are currently hospitalized in New Mexico. This number does not include New Mexicans who tested positive for COVID-19 and may have been transferred to a hospital out of state.As of today, there are 1,434 COVID-19 cases designated as having recovered by the New Mexico Department of Health.The Department of Health has identified at least one positive COVID-19 case in residents and/or staff at the following congregate living and acute care facilities:Advanced Health Care of Albuquerque in AlbuquerqueAlbuquerque Heights Healthcare and Rehab in AlbuquerqueAztec Health Care in AztecBeehive Homes in FarmingtonBonney Family Home in GallupBrio Assisted Living in AlbuquerqueCedar Ridge Inn in FarmingtonCentral Desert Behavioral Health in AlbuquerqueClayton Nursing and Rehab in ClaytonHaciendas of Grace Village in Las CrucesLadera Center in AlbuquerqueLas Palomas Center in AlbuquerqueLa Vida Llena in AlbuquerqueLegacy Santa Fe in Santa FeLife Care Center of Farmington in FarmingtonLittle Sisters of the Poor in GallupMcKinley Care Center in GallupNamaste House Assisted Living in FarmingtonThe Neighborhood in Rio Rancho​Red Rocks Care Center in GallupSandia Ridge Center in AlbuquerqueSpanish Trails Rehabilitation Suites in AlbuquerqueSundance Care Home in GallupTaos Living Center in TaosTohatchi Area Opportunity Services (TAOS) in TohatchiTungland Corporation in FarmingtonUptown Genesis in AlbuquerqueThe Village at Alameda in AlbuquerqueWellbrook Transitional Rehabilitation Center in FarmingtonThe Department of Health has detected community spread in the state of New Mexico and is investigating cases with no known exposure. The agency reports that given the infectious nature of the virus it is likely other residents are infected but yet to be tested or confirmed positive. To that end, all New Mexicans have been instructed to stay home except for outings absolutely necessary for health, safety and welfare. These additional restrictions have been enacted to aggressively minimize person-to-person contact and ensure spread is mitigated. New Mexicans are strongly urged to limit travel to only what is necessary for health, safety and welfare.The New Mexico Department of Health has active investigations into the positive patients, which includes contact-tracing and swabs of symptomatic individuals who have had contact with the positive cases.Every New Mexican must work together to stem the spread of COVID-19. Stay home.New Mexicans who report symptoms of COVID-19 infection, such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and/or loss of taste or smell should call their health care provider or the NMDOH COVID-19 hotline immediately (1-855-600-3453).Thanks to increased statewide testing capacity, the following people may now be considered for COVID-19 testing: Asymptomatic people who are close contacts or household members of New Mexico residents who have already tested positive for the coronavirus;Asymptomatic residents in nursing homes;Asymptomatic people in congregate settings such as homeless shelters, group homes, detention centers;Asymptomatic people who are currently working; andSymptomatic people displaying the COVID-19 symptoms of cough, fever, shortness of breath, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and/or loss of taste or smell.New Mexicans who have non-health-related questions or concerns can also call 833-551-0518 or visit newmexico.gov, which is being updated regularly as a one-stop source for information for families, workers and others affected by and seeking more information about COVID-19.,STATE News:SANTA FE – New Mexico state health officials have announced this afternoon 143 additional positive tests for COVID-19.Los Alamos County remains at 6 cases that have tested positive for COVID-19.Today’s update includes 11 additional deaths reported in New Mexico related to COVID-19. Per the New Mexico Department of Health reported today the most recent cases:last_img read more

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Skolnik: COVID-19 – Time Is Running Out

first_imgBy RICHARD SKOLNIKLos AlamosThe US is falling further and further behind in its fight against COVID-19. The number of new cases has been at an all-time high. The number of deaths has been climbing. We have the tenth highest number of deaths per million population in the world and Florida has almost as many cases in a week as China has had during its entire outbreak. In addition, many hospitals are becoming overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients, health workers continue to face PPE shortages, and test results are taking so long in some places that they are of no value in managing the epidemic.In fact, when it comes to COVID-19, the US is a shockingly bad outlier. Many other countries, from all income groups, have effectively used traditional public health measures, plus varying degrees of “lockdowns” to suppress the outbreak. Vietnam has had fewer than 1,000 cases and Thailand fewer than 3,500. Rwanda can return COVID-19 test results faster than many places in the US. Although the virus arrived in South Korea and the US on the same day, an American has a 70 times greater risk of dying of COVID-19 than a South Korean.Moreover, our COVID-19 trajectory puts us on course to have more than 200,000 deaths by the early fall. This will be about the same number who died in the 20-year Vietnam War. It will be about half the number of military casualties in World War II. We are also at risk of a long-lasting pandemic-related economic depression and the outbreak has profound psychological, social, and educational costs.Our failures to address COVID-19 effectively are overwhelmingly self-inflicted. Our federal government and many state governments have failed to implement well-known public health strategies effectively:Leaders in successful countries identified clear national goals, created a national consensus around those goals, and organized their institutions to achieve them as if their country’s life depended on it.Leaders in the successful countries provided clear and consistent messaging to their people about the nature of the problem, what it would take to address it, and the role of different members of society if they were to tame the outbreak.Countries that have done well against the outbreak have taken policy measures in line with emerging evidence about the disease. They worked continuously to ensure that their people overwhelmingly supported such measures.The countries that have kept new cases and deaths low effectively implemented public health measures at an early stage, including testing, isolation of the infected, contract tracing, and quarantine of their contacts.If we don’t want COVID-19 to get much worse, we need to stop making excuses for American failures. We also need to act in a number of areas with extreme urgency:We must recommit to suppressing the virus.While continuing to promote the development of a vaccine, we must not wait for it, unless we want millions of additional people to get infected and tens of thousands more to die.We must dramatically revise the approach to COVID-19 in states that are seeing major rises in infections.Some or all states will have to work together, even without the federal government, if necessary, to create a coordinated approach to testing and the procurement of needed equipment.We must encourage innovation and social action, such as the Rockefeller Foundation plan to take testing to 30 million a week.States must push national leadership to empower and support CDC, rather than to work around it.We must ensure that appropriate data is consistently collected, available to all, and used in scientific and not political ways as a basis for decision making.We must promote personal responsibility for wearing masks and social distancing whenever we are near other people.We also need to reject thoroughly the idea that “only deaths matter”. Each person who gets COVID-19 needs to be isolated. Each infected person is at risk of infecting others, and could be hospitalized, wind up in an ICU, or die. Many of those who get infected will survive but could face potentially long-lasting neurological, vascular, or pulmonary complications and disabilities. We have no idea yet about the extent to which people with infection and only limited symptoms might wind up later with complications of the infection. Each case also raises a host of social and economic consequences. Thus, completely contrary to what some of our leaders tell us – each case has enormous costs and consequences and we must beat back the virus now.Some governors, both Democrats and Republicans have shown how to lead. Some states, like Connecticut, are winning against the virus. However, if we continue as a nation on our present route, we are headed over the cliff. Let’s hope that we can be exceptional enough to realize this, wake up, and take the urgent actions needed to correct our course.Editor’s note: Richard Skolnik is the former regional director for health for South Asia at the World Bank. He was the director of an AIDS treatment program for Harvard and taught Global Health at the George Washington University and Yale. He is the author of Global Health 101 and the instructor for Yale/Coursera’s Essentials of Global Health.last_img read more

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Valve experts open service centre in China

Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribe

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Qatargas 2 project yields even more LNG

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Positive Comments for Charleston Deepening

first_imgThe SC Ports Authority has announced October volumes up nearly 17 percent year over year, continuing a strong growth trend in container traffic well above the organization’s financial plan.SCPA handled 164,672 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) in October, up from 141,049 TEUs moved during the same month last year. Fiscal year to date, TEU volumes are up 14 percent and nearly 13 percent ahead of plan.As measured in pier containers, October volume increased 19 percent over the same month last year, with 94,470 boxes moved. Fiscal year to date, pier container volume is 12 percent over plan and 15 percent higher than the same period last year.Total breakbulk cargo tonnage also continues to climb, with fiscal year-to-date volumes 20 percent ahead of plan. Last month Charleston handled with 87,224 pier tons for an increase of 7 percent over fiscal year-to-date plans. Georgetown also contributed to strength in the business segment, with 62,591 pier tons handled in October for a 42 percent gain over planned fiscal year-to-date tonnage.The South Carolina Inland Port in Greer continues to exceed performance expectations, handling 4,678 rail lifts in October. Fiscal year to date, rail lifts at the facility are up 1.5 times over plan with 17,714 moves since July.“SCPA’s strong volume and earnings performance is broad-based and reflective of the growth in a number of market segments combined with the fact that our port continues to offer the highest levels of service and reliability in the US port industry,” said SCPA president and CEO Jim Newsome.“While we are pleased with the strong levels of growth, we expect this growth to moderate in the last two months of the year and into next year. We do believe that the South Atlantic port market will continue to outperform the U.S. port market due to strength in manufacturing along with overall regional growth.”Newsome discussed the statewide support for harbor deepening received during the public comment period for the Draft Integrated Feasibility Report and Environmental Impact Statement issued by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).“We are grateful for the positive comments received concerning the Charleston harbor deepening study. Upon completion, the project will give Charleston the deepest harbor on the U.S. East Coast,” Newsome said.In action items, the Board approved an offer from the Furman Company Investment Advisory Services, LLC to purchase the Port of Port Royal for $15.42 million. Pending review and approval of the offer by the SC Budget and Control Board, the SCPA will issue a contract to the Furman Company and a formal inspection period will begin.“The SCPA is pleased to move forward with the presentation of the offer to the Budget and Control Board,” said SCPA Board Chairman Bill Stern. “We remain committed to selling the Port of Port Royal for the benefit of both the Town and Ports Authority.”Press Releaselast_img read more

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Atlantic Petroleum sheds Norwegian assets and licenses

first_imgAtlantic Petroleum’s fully owned subsidiary Atlantic Petroleum Norge (APN) has entered into a sale and purchase agreement with M Vest Energy for the sale of its Norwegian activities for the consideration of NOK 1. The Norwegian activities include all of Atlantic Petroleum Norge’s assets and licenses, the liabilities of the licences, the employees and a cash balance of approx. NOK 19MM to be adjusted for costs and expenses from the date of the transaction, January 1, 2016, to closing, Atlantic Petroleum said on Wednesday.According to the parent company, subject to completion, the transaction will constitute a cessation of all of Atlantic Petroleum Norge’s petroleum activities. As a result of the transaction, the company expects to record an impairment of DKK approx. 150 MM, and Atlantic Petroleum Norge expects to realize the tax value of the tax loss carry forward in December 2017, currently estimated to be approx. NOK 27MM in cash.M Vest Energy is a company partially owned by the existing management of Atlantic Petroleum Norge.CEO Ben Arabo comments: “Following a formal sales process last year failing to solicit bids for the Company or parts thereof, Atlantic Petroleum has over the past months been reviewing a range of strategic alternatives and the sale of its Norwegian activities is a step in the process of trying to resolve the issues facing the group in the current oil & gas industry market conditions. We believe the transaction is in the best interest of all stakeholders of the Company and we are pleased that the activities in APN will be continued through M Vest Energy.”The company stated that the proposed transaction is conditional upon certain conditions including the approval from the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy and the Ministry of Finance. Atlantic Petroleum also said on Wednesday that Atlantic Petroleum North Sea remains in default on the Ettrick, Blackbird and Chestnut fields. The Ettrick and Blackbird fields are subject to forfeiture by the operator of these fields, Nexen, (acting on behalf of itself and its co-venturers), which if such forfeiture proceeds, is subject to certain regulatory and contractual conditions.Also, the company has lost the rights to petroleum from the Chestnut field whilst in default and has a certain period in which to remedy the default. Atlantic Petroleum North Sea is involved in discussions with Nexen on the question of forfeiture, and continues to review its options during the time period available to remedy the default on Chestnut.Atlantic Petroleum is still in dialogue with a London based group on potential solutions for the company. The company is also continuing discussions with its key creditors and stakeholders including the UK Oil & Gas Authority. These discussions are continuing.“There is no certainty that a solution or a satisfactory outcome will be forthcoming for the company and failing that, it is likely that the company or subsidiaries will go into restructuring or administration. The company is continuing its planning for all outcomes,” Atlantic Petroleum concluded. Restructuring or administration?last_img read more

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Siem Offshore to Install Nordsee One Inter-Array Cables by End of August

first_imgSiem Offshore’s recent additions to the fleet, the installation support vessel Siem Moxie and the cable lay vessel Siem Aimery, are expected to install all of the 59 inter-array grid cables for the 332MW Nordsee One offshore wind farm by the end of August.Siem Offshore Contractors GmbH (SOC), a wholly owned subsidiary of Siem Offshore, won a contract for the turnkey supply and installation package of the inter-array grid cable system for the Nordsee One in April 2014.The wind farm’s 54 6.15MW turbines will be connected to the offshore substation by ten strings of cables with an overall length of approximately 70 kilometres.Nordsee One is owned by Northland Power Inc. (85%) and RWE Innogy GmbH (15%). The wind farm is located approximately 40 kilometres north of the island of Juist in the German part of the North Sea.The commissioning of the wind farm is scheduled for 2017.last_img read more

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