After the UN declaration on AMR, what comes next?

first_imgWith last week’s approval of a United Nations (UN) declaration on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), world leaders have made a commitment to fight the rise of drug-resistant pathogens and ensure continued access to life-saving antibiotics. Now comes the hard part: Turning the commitment into action.Advancements will take place on the national level, with governments creating plans to monitor antibiotic resistant infections, reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics in human and animal health and agriculture, and educate the public about antibiotic stewardship. Some countries have already started down this path. But for others, especially low-income nations with weak healthcare systems and a host of other health challenges, the task will be more difficult.”It’s very hard to deny medicines to people who are sick,” said Laura Kahn, MD, MPH, a physician and research scholar at Princeton University and author of the book One Health and the Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance. As Kahn explains, many developing nations use antibiotics as a substitute for sanitation, hygiene, and medical care. Asking them to reduce antibiotic use essentially removes a critical tool from their healthcare arsenal.This is where organizations like the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) will play a significant role. But how these UN bodies will ensure every country is holding up its end of the bargain remains an open question.The challenge of implementation”Implementing this will not be easy, at all,” said Gian Luca Burci, JD, former legal counsel for the WHO. The UN declaration calls for the creation of a body that will coordinate the efforts of the WHO, FAO, and OIE. But coordination will be a challenge, Burci explained, because those organizations represent different constituencies with different priorities.  The organization that is in the best position to take the lead, Burci said, is the WHO. The agency’s AMR action plan, put forward in 2015, forms the blueprint of the UN declaration. The plan calls for nations to improve public awareness and understanding of AMR, increase surveillance for drug-resistant organisms, reduce the incidence of infection through improved sanitation and hygiene, promote antimicrobial stewardship in human and animal health, and increase investment in new antibiotics, diagnostics, and vaccines.In Burci’s view, implementation of the plan could follow two paths. The WHO could work with experts to create detailed national action plans that include targets and goals for reduced antibiotic use. Or member states could take the lead and come up with “soft” targets that are more politically viable. Given how many sectors will be affected by targets, in particular the agricultural sector, Burci said this might be the likelier path.”I wouldn’t be surprised if you see member states try to take the lead, or at least be part of the follow-up process,” he said.One of the fears, though, is that some countries might come up with soft targets and then fail to meet their commitments, leaving other countries to shoulder the burden. Big food-producing nations like Argentina and Brazil, for example, could have a lot to lose from phasing out the use of antibiotics in livestock. “The issue is a level playing field,” Burci said. “There is a fear of free-riding.”Political pressureThis is where the UN plays an important role. By acknowledging the grave and urgent threat posed by AMR and committing countries to take action, the UN declaration adds a level of political pressure that can force nations to make AMR a priority and facilitate policy coherence.Any movement on AMR, though, could be hampered by transitions going on at the UN and the WHO, where leadership changes will occur in the coming months. “I think a lot really depends on who the next UN secretary-general is and who the next director-general of the WHO is,” notes Ramanan Laxminarayan, PhD, MPH, director of the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy (CDDEP). “They’ve got many other priorities, but will they recognize that this is a really important issue they should not put on the back burner?”Laxminarayan is hoping that the UN reaches to other parties to help fight AMR. “This problem can be solved only partially by UN agencies and their ways of working,” he said. “Unless they reach out to the broad set of academics, clinicians, veterinarians…that lie outside of governments, it will not get solved.”That’s because reducing drug-resistant infections and antibiotic use is not as straightforward as fixing the hole in the ozone, Laxminarayan explained. That effort required governments to change regulatory standards and companies to meet those standards. AMR, on the other hand, requires a broader set of stakeholders.Holding the UN accountableLaxminarayan is among those who think targets for reducing inappropriate antibiotic use are a critical element in the battle against AMR. These types of targets, he argues, will enable the UN to measure progress.If the UN effort against AMR lags, Laxminarayan said he and others will be there to “hold their feet to the fire.” To that end, CDDEP has joined with other public health and infectious disease groups to form CARA, the Conscience of Antimicrobial Resistance Action. CARA envisions its role as something of a watchdog that will hold the UN—along with international health agencies and member states—accountable for meeting its commitment to fight AMR. Among the tasks of the organization will be to monitor progress toward agreed-upon goals, and independently establish a set of targets that countries should aim to meet.”It is not enough for countries, politicians, businesses and the healthcare community to make pledges for change,” Laxminarayan and Dilip Nathwani, OBE, of the British Society of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy wrote recently in New Scientist. “They must know that they’re being watched, but also that our community of experts stands ready to help.”See also:Sep 21 UN draft political declaration on AMRSep 21 CIDRAP News story “UN leaders pledge to fight antimicrobial resistance”May 2015 WHO Global Action Plan on AMRSep 20 CARA press releaseSep 22 New Scientist commentary (free registration required)last_img read more

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Los Alamos Mountaineers Hold Gear And Clothing Collection For Homeless Saturday Dec. 14

first_imgPlease drop off 8-9 a.m. Saturday Dec. 14 at Sullivan Field parking lot in Los Alamos – look for the green Ford Bronco with a rooftop rack.The Los Alamos Mountaineers are an open-to-all non-profit organization dedicated to outdoor adventuring and safety education. Donations to LAM are not tax deductible. Los Alamos Mountaineers News: The Los Alamos Mountaineers are collecting donations of serviceable camping gear and outdoor clothing to be distributed by area homeless shelters.  Our homeless neighbors can use packs, sleeping bags, sleeping pads, tents, and outdoor clothing such as jackets, hats, gloves, socks, and boots (for men, women, and children).last_img read more

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Image gallery: Architects, designers and artists present views around The Shard

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Tabak: without prejudice

first_imgJudging by the mood on Twitter – not to mention comments on newspaper websites – the public is seething. People are obviously appalled by Vincent Tabak’s crime, but they are equally livid at the law – and, specifically, the judge who deemed inadmissible so much of the evidence about his character. A suspect’s record is generally not disclosed to a jury during their trial, and for good reason. The person in the dock may have a string of convictions for similar offences, but that is not proof of guilt for this one. A change to this practice (although similar fact evidence is admissible) could only harm the rule of law and interests of justice, tempting police and prosecutors in search of a conviction to rely on an individual’s past to secure an otherwise unwinnable case. Yet so much of Tabak’s background and character was withheld from the public that many will struggle to comprehend how it was not deemed relevant to his prosecution. Tabak was convicted on Friday by a majority verdict of murdering Joanna Yeates. He strangled the young woman in her flat before dumping the body on the side of the road. The judge in the case decided jurors would not be told of Tabak’s use of sex workers on business trips to Los Angeles, despite his pleas as a committed boyfriend forming part of his defence. They were not informed that Tabak’s computer had numerous links to hardcore pornography sites, with images of men having sex while holding their hands around the neck of a woman and one picture in particular of a woman resembling Yeates. With the outpouring of this nature, we can be thankful the jury recorded the verdict it did, but should this information have been allowed to be presented in court? There is a fine line between information that prejudices a case, and the case itself. Tabak’s fondness for pornography does not make him a pre-meditated killer, but the nature and content of the material he enjoyed – and the obvious parallels with elements of this case – do point to information that was relevant. Certainly we can expect a degree of revulsion from the public at the withholding of this information. The jury deliberated for two and a half days, and there will be anger that Tabak was seemingly in with a chance of being acquitted of murder. But the level of public interest in the case is probably the biggest reason why the judge rightly erred on the side of caution. This was a case that provoked extreme emotion and would surely have been familiar to members of the jury. It is understandable that the judge sought to separate conjecture from fact. His job was to ensure a fair trial, and the evidence against Tabak was overwhelming enough to convict without the jury seeing the contents of his computer. If they had known, there is almost no doubt that 12 rather than 10 would have been convinced of his guilt. But how many would have assumed Tabak’s guilt on account of his behaviour rather than his actions? The law will be deemed an ass by many, but in this case it seems to me that justice has been done.last_img read more

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Ocean7 gets six reels rolling

first_imgThe project required the vessel’s weather deck to be extended, explained Ocean7, adding that it managed to reach a suitable solution with regards to stability, deck strength and weight spreading with the help of its partners Global Cargo Care.  www.ocean7projects.comwww.abisshipping.nl www.globalcargocare.comlast_img

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District judge ‘sarcastic and shaking with rage’ in flawed family hearing

first_imgThe Family Court has overturned a district judge’s care ruling after finding she ‘crossed the line’ during the hearing, creating a hostile atmosphere and alienating everyone appearing before her.In C (A Child) (Judicial Conduct), His Honour Judge Mark Rogers said District Judge Mian had conducted the March hearing with ‘serious procedural irregularity’ and made it impossible to ensure proceedings were fair. He upheld the appeal from the mother and appointed Guardian of a one-year-old child, who had been made subject to a care order rather than place with her grandparents.Taking the decision to deliver a full judgment on the appeal and name the district judge, HHJ Mark Rogers said it was a ‘fundamental tenet’ of fairness to listen carefully to competing argument before coming to a firm decision.The court heard that the district judge’s conduct was exemplified by, in the words of the child’s barrister, ‘blasphemous words, shouting, storming our of court and general intemperate behaviour’. The district judge was also described as being sarcastic, shaking with rage, turning her chair away from the court and sitting with her back to everyone for several seconds, mimicking the advocate’s words and intimidating the child’s guardian.HHJ Mark Rogers said he had listened to the recording of the hearing himself and heard ‘with dismay, the anger and tension in the judge’s voice’. Her exchanges with the child’s barrister were ‘sharp and substantially inhibited counsel from doing her job’.The district judge’s frustration, it was found, stemmed from her view that the guardian’s analysis was deficient and did not grapple with the central issue of the case. The child’s barrister submitted the district judge’s treatment of the guardian was ‘unacceptable’. The appeal judge agreed the handling of the hearing was ‘wholly unsatisfactory and degenerated into a critique of the guardian’s perceived failure of approach’.HHJ Mark Rogers added: ‘The judge effectively cross-examined the guardian as if she were representing another hostile party. In my judgment, there and in many places elsewhere the judge went far beyond clarification or amplification and descended into the heart of the arena.’He stated that family proceedings should not be unnecessarily adversarial: points should be questioned and tested but not to the extent that a witness is unable to fulfil her role. Here, the court heard the guardian felt ‘considerably stressed and upset’.After the hearing, the child’s grandparents wrote to the guardian saying parts of the hearing were ‘extremely distressing’ with a ‘constant barrage of interruptions aimed at professional witnesses and barristers questioning them’ which brought into question the impartiality of proceedings.last_img read more

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Postgraduate partnership extended

first_imgRUSSIA: Russian Railways and DB Schenker agreed at the 1520 Strategic Business Forum in Sochi on May 31 to extend their postgraduate educational partnership for a further five years.DB Schenker and RZD established a joint Centre for International Logistics & Supply Chain Management at St Petersburg State University in July 2009, in partnership with SSU’s Graduate School of Management, St Petersburg Transport University and the European Business School. So far the collaboration has led to the submission of more than 50 academic theses, the joint drafting of a training module for staff in RZD’s freight business, and the launch of an online supply chain management encyclopaedia. ‘We believe the centre is an important investment in the future’, explained DB Chairman Rüdiger Grube.last_img read more

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Gonsalves grants salary increase as SVG celebrates 36 years of independence

first_imgAs St. Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG) celebrates its 36th anniversary of political independence from Britain on Tuesday,Prime Minister Dr. Ralph Gonsalves announced a salary increase of 2.5 per cent for 2015, retroactive to January 1 and payable on December 18.“This increase is at 2. 5 per cent and it is tax-free.  The cost to the Treasury amounts to approximately EC$7.25 EC million,” said Gonsalves, who is also Minister of Finance.It will be the first increase for public servants since 2011.In an address at Victoria Park, Gonsalves also announced that the much delayed multi-million dollar Argyle International Airport will be operational by 2016.He told the cheering crowd that the airport would be operational in time for the national team’s World Cup match against the United States on February, 2 next year.The prime minister’s announcement of a salary increase to public servants comes one day after the 1,500-member strong Public Service Union (PSU) said it had written to government seeking a 1.5 per cent salary increase for 2014, 2.5 per cent for 2015 and two per cent for 2016.Gonsalves said the 2015 salary increase will cost the Treasury seven million EC dollars and announced a Gonsalves, who is leading his Unity Labour Party (ULP) into general elections, said he intends to create a number of senior graduate teaching posts from the current 65 “to a number closer to one hundred to facilitate further upward mobility to these beneficiaries of the education revolution”.last_img read more

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West Florida Falls to South Alabama 82-62 In Exhibition

first_img MOBILE, Ala. – Senior guard Amy Drake (Niceville, Fla./Winthrop) shot 9-12 from the floor and scored 25 points, but the West Florida women’s basketball team fell to Division I South Alabama 82-62 on the road in an exhibition game at the Mitchell Center on Sunday.Drake scored 25 on 9-12 from the field and 3-6 from three-point territory, and she was also a perfect 4-4 at the free throw line.  Freshman forward Emily Erland (Pegram, Tenn./Harpeth HS) also scored in double digits, adding 12 points off the bench.Drake and Erland each scored 10 points in the first half, but USA was able to open up a 10-point lead at halftime at 37-27.  The Jaguars led by as many as 17 in the first half at 33-16, but the Argonauts came storming back with an 11-4 run to close the lead to 10 at halftime.South Alabama started hot in the second half and opened up a 23-point lead at 56-33 with 13:38 to go in the game.  The Argos battled back to keep the game close, as Drake’s three-pointer at the 10:51 mark narrowed the Jaguars’ lead to 13.  South Alabama regained control and kept the Argonauts at bay, eventually picking up a 20-point victory.Three Jaguars scored in double digits, led by Shaniece Brunner with 19 on 6-10 shooting from the field and 7-10 from the line.  Brunner also added 13 rebounds, including five on the offensive side, for a double-double.  Shakira Nettles scored 16 and was 9-12 from the charity stripe.USA went to the free throw line 38 times in the game and converted 29 (76.3 percent), as the Argonauts were in foul trouble early and often.  Seniors Dominique Boykins (Houston, Texas/North Shore HS) and Tiffany Williams (St. Petersburg, Fla./North Florida) each picked up three first half fouls, while Williams ended up fouling out in the second half.USA was able to score 21 second chance points in the game compared to just four for UWF, largely due to a 49-29 rebound advantage.  The Jaguars also held the advantage in points off turnovers at 19-10, as the Argos committed 20 turnovers and USA just 14.The Argonauts will tip off the regular season at home on Monday, November 16 against Mobile at 5:00 p.m.  Fans can follow all of the action live at www.GoArgos.com.Print Friendly Version West Florida Falls to South Alabama 82-62 In Exhibition Sharecenter_img Amy Drake (Photo by Jim Hogue) last_img read more

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Etebo turned down Watford for Stoke City

first_imgSuper Eagles star, Oghenekaro Etebo has revealed that he turned down the chance to join English Premier League clubs in favour of penning a deal with Stoke City this summer.The versatile midfielder has linked up with his new teammates at the Potters and is line to make his unofficial debut at their training camp in Germany this week when they face Bochum, Meppen and Hamburg in friendly matches.Speaking to the official website of Stoke City, Etebo said  “I had a lot of options this summer from the Premier League, but I signed this deal before I went to the World Cup, and I am happy with that.”“I did that because of the relationship and the conversations I had. I was happy with what was said – if I wasn’t then I wouldn’t have come to Stoke City.”“I believe that we are going to make this a great season. I am going to give my best and hopefully that will be enough for the Club.”Though Etebo and Stoke City have not revealed the identities of the clubs interested in the player’s services, allnigeriasoccer.com can exclusively report that Watford had expressed the most concrete interest in signing the Nigeria international.And he would have been at the Hornets not the Potters but the Vicarage Stadium outfit did not guarantee him playing opportunities in the new season and the contract offered to him by the Premier League side was nothing to write home about.Stoke City offered Etebo better wages than Watford and they assured him that he would play for their first team.last_img read more

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