New AWaRe tool aims to guide antibiotic use globally

first_imgUsing the “access,” “watch,” and “reserve” designations established previously, the World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new tool to limit the use of drugs associated with the highest risk of resistance and to increase the use of antibiotics in countries where supply and availability is low.The tool, called AWaRe (for Access, Watch, and Reserve), was developed by the WHO Essential Medicines List to reduce the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), antibiotic-related adverse events, and drug costs.”Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most urgent health risks of our time and threatens to undo a century of medical progress,” said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, PhD, WHO director-general, in a press release today about AWaRe.”All countries must strike a balance between ensuring access to life-saving antibiotics and slowing drug resistance by reserving the use of some antibiotics for the hardest-to-treat infections,” he added. “I urge countries to adopt AWaRe, which is a valuable and practical tool for doing just that.”Speaking at a press conference today, Hanan Balkhy, MD, the WHO’s assistant-director general for AMR, said that AWaRe is only a single tool to combat antimicrobial resistance. But a failure to use this tool, as well as others, including novel antibiotic development, will “halt modern medicine as we know it today.”Five-year goal outlinedThe first goal of AWaRe is to have all countries report antibiotic use by 2023. The second goal is to limit 60% of global antibiotic consumption to drugs from the “access” category.These drugs are narrow-spectrum, meaning they are more likely to target a limited bacterial organism and less likely to contribute to resistance. All drugs on the “aware” list are also on the WHO’s Essential Medicine’s “core” list, and include amoxicillin and cloxacillin.Currently 65 countries track antibiotic use, and only 29 of the 65 meet the 60% access antibiotics goal. Of those 29, Brazil is the largest.The “access” drugs should also be promoted for increased use in several low-income countries, the WHO said, emphasizing that underuse of life-saving antibiotics is as dangerous as AMR. Balkhy and colleagues said in today’s press conference that annually 1 million pediatric deaths in developing countries are caused by treatable bacterial infections.The WHO developed the access, watch, and aware categories 2 years ago to combat AMRLimiting ‘watch,’ ‘reserve’ drugsThe other designations belong to drugs that carry with them resistance risks, including fluoroquinolones (placed in the “watch” category) and last-resort antibiotics that are currently able to fight multi- (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant (XDR) bacteria. Those drugs, including ceftazidime-avibactam and polymyxins, are on the “reserve” list, and should be used only when all other options fail.Some countries, including the United Kingdom, Bangladesh, and Germany have already adopted AWaRe, and the tool gained approval of the G20 last year.See also:Jun 18 WHO press releaseAWaRe websiteJun 6, 2017, CIDRAP News story “WHO revises essential drug list to battle antibiotic resistance”last_img read more

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Learning from Las Vegas

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Mozah makes maiden voyage to UK

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Ammonia plant production discussed at SynGas 2015

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Total, Aker Solutions developing ‘cost-effective’ subsea field technology

first_imgFrench oil company Total, and Norwegian oilfield services provider Aker Solutions will collaborate on research and innovation with the aim to develop new cost-effective subsea field technology.The initial four-year technical collaboration agreement will build on earlier cooperation and bring both companies closer in developing technologies that will reduce costs and increase value at subsea oil and gas fields, Aker Solutions said in a statement on Tuesday.In 2016, the partnership says it explore a wide range of issues, including further evolution of subsea processing and compression systems to boost cost-efficiency of deepwater gas production, development of electric subsea controls and optimization of flow-measurement technologies. Further scope of the collaboration will be defined over the next months.“This joint effort reinforces our common interest in finding more effective solutions to maximize value from subsea field developments,” said Hervé Valla, chief technology officer at Aker Solutions. “It allows us to work more closely with Total to solve technical challenges faced by the industry today and to reduce the time needed to bring subsea technology to the market.”last_img read more

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Construction industry gossip: Toilet roll troubles and home schooling

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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End ‘campaign’ against solicitor-advocates – Bourns

first_imgThe Law Society is investigating ways to promote the work of solicitor-advocates amid concerns that they have been subjected to a ‘negative campaign’ questioning their competence.In an interview for the Society’s advocacy section, president Robert Bourns (pictured) said solicitor-advocates were not being given enough credit for their excellent work.Bourns said solicitor-advocates had been subject to a long-term negative ‘campaign’ that appears intended to raise questions over their adequacy and competence.‘They have taken the brunt of public spending cuts and yet continue to do incredibly important work to a very high standard,’ he added.Based on his own experience, Bourns said the Jeffrey Review on independent criminal advocacy, which was endorsed by former justice secretary Michael Gove, unfairly dismissed the significance of the work undertaken by a solicitor in the progress of criminal defence cases from police investigation to trial.  He also challenged ‘serious criticism’ that solicitors were not good at recognising or dealing with conflicts of interest.As a result, the Society has established a working group to look at what can be done to promote the position of solicitor-advocates.‘Significant’ initiatives will be unveiled later this year, Bourns said.Discussing the impact of litigants in person on workload and costs, Bourns said the profession needs to recognise that solicitor-advocates and the advocacy of solicitors is different from the advocacy offered by some counsel.‘Solicitors are constantly described as trying to position themselves alongside barristers in an almost competitive environment,’ he said. ‘Clearly, there is an element of competition for work, but actually the advocacy that solicitors practise is very different.’William Richmond-Coggan, vice-chair of the Solicitors Association of Higher Court Advocates, said the association had won numerous victories in the drive to put barristers and solicitor-advocates on an equal footing in the eyes of the court and the public. These include initiatives over court dress and a recent campaign to have the QC applications process reviewed in order to root out potential bias against solicitor applicants.But Richmond-Coggan said there is more to do. ‘It is no secret that the bar, particularly concerned about the threat posed to its junior members by the cost-effective, pragmatic and end-to-end service that solicitor-advocates routinely offer, is determined to fight for its members’ interests, even if that is at the risk of unjustly discrediting their fellow professionals,’ he added.‘While we would not necessarily stoop to the same tactics, the association is determined to continue fighting for the interests of its members. And if the Law Society is serious about doing the same we will welcome them to the cause.’last_img read more

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Champerty: Irish court deals a blow to third-party funders

first_imgFour Courts in DublinSource: AlamyFunders had hoped that the Supreme Court would take the opportunity to develop the historic doctrine of maintenance and champerty – which prevents third parties from financing litigation in which they are not involved – to open the door to the litigation funding industry.Persona’s case had a strong public interest element, as it involved disputed allegations over the way that telecoms licences had been awarded and the claimants lacked the means to proceed without financial support.But chief justice Susan Denham said: ‘It was argued that the court could develop the common law on champerty in light of modern policy and constitutional issues.’‘As to policy issues, this would involve complex situations more suited to legislation… As to constitutional issues, this was not brought as a constitutional challenge. Clearly, constitutional issues have been parked by the plaintiffs, perhaps for another day.’She added: ‘The court was asked not to be seduced into changing the law in the interests of what the court may perceive to be just. It may be said that in light of modern issues, such as Ireland being an international trading state, issues arising on arbitrations, and in the Commercial Court, it might well be appropriate to have a modern law on champerty and the third-party funding of litigation.‘However, that is a complex, multi-faceted issue, more suited to a full legislative analysis.’Susan Dunn, Harbour’s head of funding, said: ‘Both we and the claimants are disappointed by today’s outcome. We spent a lot of time reviewing this claim and still believe it to be one of the most meritorious cases we have ever considered, and one in the public interest, and that it should be pursued… It is a shame if meritorious claims such as this still cannot be pursued in Ireland, simply for lack of funding.’Dunn added that the decision went against the ‘recent trend of positive developments’ regarding third party-funding, in Singapore, Hong Kong, Dubai and Paris. Ireland’s Supreme Court today delivered a blow to the growing international market in third-party litigation funding. In a much-awaited ruling in Persona Digital Telephony Ltd v The Minister for Public Enterprise, Ireland’s highest court ruled that litigation funding remains unlawful in the jurisdiction, and is both a civil and criminal offence.The claimant, Persona, had sought a declaration from the court that in entering into a funding agreement with Harbour Litigation Funding – without which, it would not have the money to bring its claim – it was not ‘engaging in an abuse of process and/or not contravening the rules on maintenance and champerty’.The Supreme Court refused to give the order, upholding an earlier decision given in the High Court, that such funding was unlawful.last_img read more

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Private sector expertise

first_imgJacek Leonkiewicz (photo) was appointed Chairman of PKP Intercity on January 16 in succession to Marcin Celejewski. A former banker, he became a board member at PKP SA in 2013, also serving as Chairman of the supervisory board at PKP subsidiary T K Telekom. In 2014 he became a member of the supervisory board of PKP Cargo and Chairman of the supervisory board at PKP Energetyka SA. As well as helping to prepare PKP Cargo for its flotation on the Warszawa stock exchange last year, he has been working to prepare both T K Telekom and PKP Energetyka for privatisation.last_img read more

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Dominicans urged to ‘participate fully’ in Independence celebrations

first_img Share Chief Cultural Officer, Raymond LawrenceDominica’s chief cultural officer has issued a call to citizens to participate fully in this year’s Independence celebrations.On 3 November 1978, Dominica became an independent nation. This year will therefore mark thirty-five years since Dominica obtained independence from the British Empire.This year’s celebration which spans over six weeks will be observed under the theme, “One Mission, One Dominica, Celebrating 35”.“Independence as we all know is a wonderful time for nation-building, building identity, building pride in self, pride in country,” Raymond Lawrence said on Friday, 16th August.“We’re encouraging you, everybody here to participate fully in this year’s independence celebrations,” Mr Lawrence said in his address at the closing ceremony of a Summer Arts Program at the Old Mill Cultural Center in Canefield. “It’s a special anniversary, the thirty-fifth anniversary of Dominica’s independence so we’re really appealing to the entire public to come out and participate fully in the celebrations this year,” he stated further.The Cultural Division, which spear-heads activities to commemorate Independence celebrations, is expected to launch the calendar of activities next month.Dominica Vibes News Share Tweet Sharecenter_img 18 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! LocalNews Dominicans urged to ‘participate fully’ in Independence celebrations by: – August 16, 2013last_img read more

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