Nintendo Power Returns as an Official Nintendo Podcast

first_imgLet us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. If you’re an old-school gamer then you no doubt remember reading Nintendo Power magazine. This magazine was essential for those who wanted to get more out of their games. It certainly paved the way for countless other video game magazines. Nintendo Power ceased publication in 2012 but it’s now back as an official podcast from Nintendo.The podcast is hosted by Chris Slate, who is the former editor-in-chief of Nintendo Power magazine. During the inaugural episode, Slate interviews The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild producer Eiji Aonuma and director Hidemaro Fujibayashi. He also talks to Kit Ellis, who is the co-host of the Nintendo Minute series on YouTube, and Damon Baker, who is the head of partner management for Nintendo’s publisher and developer relations group.As reported by Polygon, Slate says the Nintendo Power podcast is a “passion project” project for Nintendo. Since the podcast is still somewhat experimental, it is unclear how consistently new episodes will release. We also don’t know if the podcast will mostly just consist of Slate interviewing various developers. Things are still in an early state, so I suppose it’s best to see where things go from here.Nintendo Power was one of the first gaming magazines I read as a kid so having it come back as a podcast makes me happy. If the show continues, I hope to see future episodes include tips and tricks for games. This was a cornerstone of the magazine so it would be great to see the podcast incorporate this aspect. Given how audio podcasts aren’t as popular as video podcasts in the gaming community, it would be nice to also see the series on YouTube. Whatever ends up happening with this show, it has my full support.You can check out the Nintendo Power podcast on iTunes and SoundCloud. A Google Play version is currently in the works. Make sure to listen to the first episode, which is embedded above. Here Are All the Nintendo Power Issues You Should ReadNintendo Game Counselor Guide from the 80’s discovered center_img Stay on targetlast_img read more

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10 Amazing Space Selfies Taken 250 Miles Above Earth

first_img As we head into the weekend for rest and relaxation, the Expedition 59 crew in the International Space Station is preparing for the next spacewalk, scheduled for Monday.And while astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques will be busy for six-and-a-half hours installing truss jumpers to provide a redundant power source to the Canadarm2 robotic arm outside the station and installing cables to update the station’s External Wireless Communications system, we know a spacewalk is also a historically perfect time for a “space selfie.”Through the years, astronauts have taken some of the best images during spacewalks or extravehicular activities (EVAs) to do work on the outside of spacecraft, hundreds of miles above the surface of the Earth. Here are 10 out-of-this-world “selfies” taken by astronauts during spacewalks.View as: One Page Slides1. Ricky Arnold, 2018Photo Credit: NASANASA astronaut Ricky Arnold takes an out-of-this-world ‘space selfie’ during a spacewalk he conducted with fellow NASA astronaut Drew Feustel (out of frame) on June 14, 2018. During the six-hour, 49-minute spacewalk the duo installed high-definition cameras to provide enhanced views of commercial crew spacecraft, including the SpaceX Crew Dragon and the Boeing Starliner, as they approach and dock with the International Space Station.2. Nick Hague, 2019Photo Credit: NASANASA astronaut Nick Hague takes a ‘space selfie’ with his helmet visor up and the Earth 260 miles below him during a six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk to upgrade the orbital complex’s power storage capacity on March 29, 2019.3. Annie McClain, 2019Photo Credit: NASAAstronaut Anne McClain takes a ‘space-selfie’ with her helmet visor up, 260 miles above the Earth’s surface during a six-hour, 39-minute spacewalk to upgrade the orbital complex’s power storage capacity on March 22, 2019.4. Mark Vande Hei, 2018Photo Credit: NASAOn Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018, Mark Vande Hei snapped his own portrait, better known as a ‘space-selfie,’ during a seven-hour, 24-minute spacewalk with astronauts Vande Hei and crewmate Scott Tingle outside the International Space Station to perform maintenance on the station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm.5. Mike Hopkins, 2013Photo Credit: NASAOn Dec. 24, 2013, NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 Flight Engineer, participates in a spacewalk, spread over a four-day period, designed to allow the crew to change out a degraded pump module on the exterior of the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. He was joined on both spacewalks by NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, whose image shows up in Hopkins’ helmet visor.6. Scott Kelly, 2015Photo Credit: NASAExpedition 45 Commander Scott Kelly took this photograph during a spacewalk on Oct. 28, 2015. Sharing the image on social media, Kelly wrote, “#SpaceWalkSelfie Back on the grid! Great first spacewalk yesterday. Now on to the next one next week. #YearInSpace”7. Alexander Gerst, 2014Photo Credit: NASAEuropean Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 41 flight engineer, uses a digital still camera to expose a photo of his helmet visor during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station on Oct. 7, 2014. Also visible in the reflections in the visor are various components of the space station and a bright sun. 8. Ricky Arnold, 2018Photo Credit: NASANASA astronaut Ricky Arnold took this selfie during the May 16, 2018, spacewalk to perform upgrades on the International Space Station, saying in a tweet “An amazing view of our one and only planet. #Spacewalk #EVA50.”9. Thomas Pesquet, 2017Photo Credit: NASAEuropean Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet is photographed during a six-hour spacewalk in January 2017. 10. Aki Hoshide, 2012Photo Credit: NASAAstronaut Aki Hoshide of Japan recorded this striking image while helping to augment the capabilities of the Earth-orbiting International Space Station (ISS) on September 18, 2012. Visible in this outworldly assemblage is the Sun, the Earth, two portions of a robotic arm, an astronaut’s spacesuit, the deep darkness of space, and the unusual camera taking the picture.More on Geek.com:First All-Female Spacewalk Aborted Due to Ill-Fitting SuitNASA’s Curiosity Rover Snaps a Selfie Before Its Next Mars JourneyNASA Spots Red Glowing Butterfly in Space NASA Says 2 Asteroids Will Safely Fly By Earth This WeekendScientists Discover Possible Interstellar Visitor Stay on targetlast_img read more

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Bernie Sanders to Disney Use Avengers Profits to Pay Workers More

first_img A day after Disney’s superhero blockbuster Avengers: Endgame took home a record-breaking $1.2 billion at the worldwide box office, Sen. Bernie Sanders took to Twitter to criticize Disney CEO Bob Iger’s salary and urge the company to use the profits to pay workers more.“What would be truly heroic is if Disney used its profits from Avengers to pay all of its workers a middle class wage, instead of paying its CEO Bob Iger $65.6 million – over 1,400 times as much as the average worker at Disney makes,” Sanders, a 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful, tweeted on Monday.What would be truly heroic is if Disney used its profits from Avengers to pay all of its workers a middle class wage, instead of paying its CEO Bob Iger $65.6 million – over 1,400 times as much as the average worker at Disney makes. https://t.co/NrcFSk4LZc— Bernie Sanders (@SenSanders) April 29, 2019In the U.S. alone, the latest installment of the Marvel Studios franchise, brought in a record $350 million, according to a Disney press release.This is not the first time that Sanders, known as a staunch proponent of workers’ rights, has referenced the entertainment empire regarding fair pay. In August, Sanders tweeted praise for Disney World employees and unions for successfully securing a $15 minimum wage for its workers.Congratulations to the courageous workers and their unions at Disney World for their historic victory. I applaud everyone who stood up to demand that workers at one of the wealthiest corporations in the world should have a decent standard of living. https://t.co/pdEzhBUPQU— Bernie Sanders (@SenSanders) August 27, 2018Abigail Disney, a granddaughter of company co-founder Roy Disney, also recently criticized Iger’s monumental salary, calling Iger’s pay “insane” while speaking on a panel about “humane capitalism” at a Fast Company conference earlier this month.“I like Bob Iger. Let me be very clear: I think he’s a good man. But I think he’s allowing himself to go down a road that is the road everyone is going down,” she said. “When he got his bonus last year, I did the math, and I figured out that he could have given personally, out of pocket, a 15 percent raise to everyone who worked at Disneyland, and still walked away with $10 million. So there’s a point at which there’s just too much going around the top of the system into this class of people who — I’m sorry this is radical — have too much money. There is such a thing.”Globally, the Marvel Cinematic Universe films have grossed a collective $19.9 billion to date, with the four Avengers films — The Avengers, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Avengers: Infinity War, and Avengers: Endgame — accounting for nearly $6.2 billion.More on Geek.com:‘Avengers: Endgame’ Smashes Box Office Records‘Avengers: Endgame’ Comes to ‘Fortnite’‘Avengers: Endgame’ Cast Spoofs ‘We Didn’t Start the Fire’ on Fallon Stay on target Best (And Worst) Movies of Summer 2019Marvel Writer Dan Slott: Spider-Man Should Not Have Killed in ‘Endgame’ last_img read more

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