Jersey City pharmacy to pay $825k to settle Medicaid fraud allegations

first_imgCrimeJersey City Bayonne Police: 45-year-old man arrested for attempting to have sex with 15-year-old girl in Secaucus Previous articleHoboken American Legion Post 107 needs $1M to complete veterans housingNext articleKearny 2nd Ward Councilman Jonathan Giordano passes away at age 50 John Heinis Crime Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Bayonne man pepper sprayed, arrested after punching cop in the face, authorities say TAGSherbert’s drug and surgicalmedicaid fraud divisionphilip james degnanstate comptroller SHARE Jersey City pharmacy to pay $825k to settle Medicaid fraud allegations Bayonne RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Twitter By John Heinis – January 8, 2017 10:00 am 0 A Jersey City pharmacy has agreed to pay $825,300 to settle a joint investigation by the State Comptroller and the Medicaid Fraud Division that revealed thousands of unsupported claims improperly paid with Medicaid funds, Comptroller Philip James Degnan announced. Herbert’s Drug & Surgical in Jersey City. Photo via Google Maps.By John Heinis/Hudson County ViewBased on a pharmaceutical inventory analysis performed by the Medicaid Fraud Division,  Herbert’s Drug & Surgical pharmacy claims for reimbursement lacked documentation from corresponding invoices for more than 8,000 claims between February1, 2009 and March 31, 2014.Medicaid providers, including pharmacies, are required by State law to document services in order to be reimbursed by Medicaid program funds. The pharmacies’ failure to maintain records supporting these claims created the basis for MFD’s recoveries.“Proper record keeping is vital to ensure against fraud, waste and abuse in the Medicaid program. Director Lichtblau and the Medicaid Fraud Division staff remain vigilant in rooting out non-compliance,” Degnan said in a statement.As part of its oversight role, MFD audits and investigates health care providers, managed care organizations and Medicaid recipients to identify and recover improperly expended Medicaid funds.Suspected Medicaid waste, fraud or abuse can be reported to the MFD by calling its toll-free hotline at 1-888-937-2835 or by submitting a complaint form at http://www.state.nj.us/comptroller/divisions/medicaid/complaint.html. CarePoint Health reaches deal for Cigna Health Insurance to join their networklast_img read more

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Weather alerts issued in 10 states ahead of massive storm

first_imgABC News(NEW YORK) — Ahead of a massive storm system, 10 states are under weather alerts Wednesday morning, with heavy, wet snow falling in the Rockies and flooding expected in the Ohio River Valley.The storm system Wednesday afternoon is moving into the Gulf Coast and South, with severe storms possible from San Antonio to Houston to parts of Mississippi. Damaging winds, hail and tornadoes are possible. Flooding may stretch north all the way to Louisville.The storm will move farther east by Thursday afternoon, into the central Gulf Coast region and up closer to the Ohio River Valley. Severe storms may strike anywhere from New Orleans to Tallahassee, Florida.Heavy rain is expected to strike the East Coast on Friday, stretching from Florida all the way up to the Carolinas and then into the Northeast, where flooding will be possible.Over the next few days, though, the heaviest rainfalls should be in the Ohio River Valley, where some parts may see half a foot.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Narcotics investigator shot dead on routine patrol in Georgia: ‘Losing him … is heartbreaking’

first_img[email protected], the girls, and I ask Georgians to join us in praying for Investigator Ridley’s loved ones. He gave his life to protect and serve others, and losing him in the line of duty is heartbreaking. May God give his community comfort in this difficult time. https://t.co/UnATpq3j8e— Governor Brian P. Kemp (@GovKemp) November 20, 2019 “He gave his life to protect and serve others, and losing him in the line of duty is heartbreaking,” Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp added. “May God give his community comfort in this difficult time.” kali9/iStock(AUGUSTA, Ga.) — A Georgia community is in mourning after a narcotics investigator was gunned down while on a routine patrol Tuesday night.Cecil Ridley, a narcotics investigator with the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office, was among the officers confronting individuals outside a convenience store in Augusta around 8:30 p.m., according to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation.When one of the men being questioned, 24-year-old Alvin Theodore Hester Jr., walked into the convenience store, an officer approached him inside, investigators said.Then Hester tried to leave the store, and at the same time, Ridley was walking in, investigators said.That’s when Hester approached 51-year-old Ridley and shot and killed him, according to the state investigators.Two officers returned fire at Hester and he was struck and taken into custody, authorities said.“The City of Augusta mourns with [the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office] and the family of Investigator Cecil Ridley,” Augusta Mayor Hardie Davis, Jr. tweeted. “He gave all while serving and protecting others. May we all pray for comfort and strength to the men and women who wear the uniform of [the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office].” The @CityofAugusta mourns with @RCSOGA and the family of Investigator Cecil Ridley. He gave all while serving and protecting others. May we all pray for comfort and strength to the men and women who wear the uniform of @RCSOGA pic.twitter.com/MehWg9L8sp— Hardie Davis, Jr. (@hardiedavis) November 20, 2019 Charges are expected against Hester, who remained in the hospital Wednesday morning, authorities said.Richmond County Sheriff Richard Roundtree is expected to address reporters Wednesday afternoon.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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17 bodies found inside New Jersey nursing home amid COVID pandemic

first_imgKameleon007/iStock(ANDOVER, N.J.) — The grisly discovery of 17 bodies stored inside a New Jersey nursing home amid the novel coronavirus pandemic has prompted the state to investigate the facility.Police said they found the bodies after a request came through for 25 body bags to be delivered to the Andover Subacute and Rehabilitation Center in Andover, New Jersey.Officials initially discovered five bodies in the facility’s holding area, but they were then tipped off that another body was being stored in a shed, according to police.Though no body was found in the shed, more were found inside the holding area after police searched the area again.The 17 bodies were among 68 recent deaths linked to the facility, including two nurses, officials told The New York Times, which first reported the news of the bodies.When reached by ABC News, an employee at the nursing home said there would be no comment.Nursing homes have been particularly devastated across the country under the pandemic, with some seeing daily increases in deaths. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Moscow Moves to Tighten Grip Over North Caucasus Republics

first_imgThe economic crisis in the Russian Federation has resulted in the central government further tightening its control over the republics of the North Caucasus. Ingushetia now faces a loss of its financial autonomy. Similarly, the property rights for a key tourist enterprise in Kabardino-Balkaria have been handed over to a federally owned company. In perhaps the most notable sign of this trend, Interior Ministry Colonel General Sergei Melikov has been appointed as the new governor of Dagestan.Russian Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin has instructed the authorities of Ingushetia to prepare a plan to increase solvency and to conclude an agreement with the Ministry of Finance in Moscow to transfer part of the republic’s powers on financial policy to the federal government. Formally, Moscow can announce the bankruptcy of the region if its overdue debt exceeds 30 percent of its own tax and non-tax revenues. Currently, Ingushetia owes the Russian federal budget 3.33 billion rubles (around $43 million), while its own revenues last year comprised only 2.65 billion rubles (around $34 million) (Novaya Gazeta, November 6).From now on, Ingushetia’s regional government will be unable to borrow money or unilaterally bring in investments, and a special Moscow envoy will oversee all republican expenditures. Experts point out that other Russian regions had higher debt amounts than Ingushetia in the past, but they were not declared insolvent. Ingushetia may yet avoid being called out as a bankrupt region, but its financial autonomy has already been undermined. Deep cuts in social spending might come as one of the immediate effects of Moscow’s direct involvement with Ingushetia’s finances, according to economists. This is likely to increase social discontent in a region heavily dependent on the central government’s financial assistance. Russian regions, as a whole, are projected to face a six-fold decrease in federal aid in 2021 compared to 2020.In Kabardino-Balkaria, Prime Minister Mishustin decreed to hand over 100 percent of shares of the joint-stock company Resort Elbrus from republican ownership to the Northern Caucasus Resorts Company. The stated reason for the handover is reportedly that Moscow decided to invest 10.6 billion rubles (about $137 million) into the construction of five ski-lifts on Mount Elbrus. Until recently, the Kabardino-Balkarian company has owned two of three existing ski-lifts in the area, the other one belonging to the federally owned Northern Caucasus Resorts Company (TASS, November 6). Tourism is a major source of revenue and employment in Kabardino-Balkaria. So the loss of positions in the Elbrus area for the regional government will also mean a decrease in control over an important part of its economy, even if overall revenues grow. Moscow promises large investments in the republic’s tourism industry, but in the current financial environment, those prospects look dubious.The Kremlin has also indicated its intent to tighten control over the volatile republic of Dagestan. On October 5, Colonel General Sergei Melikov, a former Kremlin envoy to the North Caucasus with a background in the Russian Interior Ministry Troops, replaced the previous governor of Dagestan, Vladimir Vasiliev, who also had a background in the interior ministry (Kremlin.ru, October 5). Although Melikov has so far made few changes in the republic, significant transformations are expected to follow soon (Chernovik, November 6). Some observers have even alleged that Melikov was specifically appointed to exert pressure on Azerbaijan by leveraging his ostensible influence with ethnic Lezgins, who are divided between Dagestan and Azerbaijan (see EDM, October 27). Melikov has Lezgin heritage but was born near Moscow and is said to be baptized as a Russian Orthodox Christian. Between September 27 and November 10, Azerbaijan and Armenia were embroiled in a fierce war over Karabakh, de jure part of Azerbaijan but de facto controlled by Armenia since 1994.From east to west across the North Caucasus, Moscow appears to be taking steps to increase its control over regional power and economic institutions. As the Russian government’s financial resources dwindle, it is gearing up to replace economic levers with administrative controls in the country’s peripheral regions. Russia faces revenue losses due to the economic crisis and stagnant fossil fuel prices (Meduza, September 11). In October, the ruble renewed its fall against major world currencies (Gazeta.ru, October 16).Moscow’s takeover of the financial system of Ingushetia paves the way for similar processes in the other North Caucasus republics. The only two possible exceptions are Dagestan and Chechnya. In Dagestan, the Kremlin has already installed a semblance of direct rule. In Chechnya, special political arrangements determine the relations of the republic with the central government.Direct control over regional financial systems in the North Caucasus might seem like an attractive idea to the Russian government because it implies greater control over potentially unstable areas. However, such moves come with their own downsides. The de facto removal of local elites from the financial system is likely to undermine their support for the current system of governance from which they benefit. The replacement of financial and power-sharing incentives with tighter controls can only help temporarily. If the economic crisis continues long enough, Moscow may be forced to reconsider its centralizing policies and again delegate more power to the regions.last_img read more

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Supervision of offshore activities is essential

first_imgIn short, the reality is completely different from the tale the oil industry is spinning. Studies show that their safety claims are being overly relied upon, and operators are failing to take effective safety measures. Another timely reminder of this problem is the recent Shell leak in the North Sea, which exposed the lack of transparency and difficulties the company had in responding to the accident. This also raises serious questions about the industry’s ability to operate in more difficult areas and more fragile environments, such as the Arctic region. Regulation at the EU level is seriously lacking, and several gaps exist in terms of transparency, the authorisation processes, the liability regime, and environmental impact assessments. There is a clear need for European oversight of offshore operations to prevent conflicts of interest, to harmonise practices and to create a true ‘EU safety culture’ with high environmental considerations. Oil spills do not respect national borders, so co-ordination within the EU and with neighbouring countries is necessary. That is the message MEPs sent to the Commission on 13 September, and we welcome this call for more stringent controls, monitoring and enforcement. Xavier Pastor Executive director, Oceana Europe Brussels I read with great concern the letter written in reaction to the article “MEPs seek tougher safety rules on offshore energy” (8-14 September) by two legal consultants that provide services to companies with an interest in offshore drilling (“Spills could be avoided under existing regime”, 22-28 September).  I was astonished by the level of hypocrisy and arrogance that it contained, particularly in the wake of major oil spills, such as the incident in the Gulf of Mexico, where billions of public money was spent to compensate the irresponsible behaviour of the oil and gas industry. That they are now openly calling for less regulation, more self-regulatory schemes and for “not repressing and punishing non-compliance,” is nothing short of a joke. Recent investigations into drilling practices in the UK and Norway – both of which have some of the highest safety standards in the world – revealed that national authorities are failing adequately to regulate offshore drilling operators, which deliberately put economic interests before safety. The UK Health and Safety Executive warned, for example, that only one in 20 of Britain’s North Sea oil platforms was in good condition and went on to express concern that companies were neglecting workers’ safety. Moreover, the UK suffered major or significant leaks in its waters at a rate of almost one every week throughout 2009 and 2010. Similarly, the Norwegian safety authority recently identified major failures in platform maintenance, as well as deficient compliance for pipelines and sub-sea equipment. last_img read more

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The Capitol Theatre To Celebrate Eighth Anniversary With Livestream Marathon

first_imgThe Capitol Theatre has announced a marathon livestream event in celebration of its eighth anniversary since reopening under Peter Shapiro. The day-long event will take place on September 12th, beginning at 1 pm ET.Originally opened on August 18th, 1926, The Capitol Theatre was a mecca for rock n’ roll in the 1970s, hosting everyone from The Rolling Stones to the Grateful Dead. In 1984 the venue changed ownership, was renovated, and the programming shifted to hosting plays and musicals, eventually seeing a brief resurgence of rock concerts in the early 1990s before once again abandoning the premise. That was until jam impresario Peter Shapiro bought The Cap in 2011, renovated it, and reopened once again on September 4th, 2012 with a concert by Bob Dylan.Related: Report: Brooklyn Bowl To Partner With Live Nation To Open Philadelphia Location In 2021Over the course of the day, fans will be treated to legendary archival sets, special live performances, greetings from venue staff, and words from the community. The free livestream will serve as a fundraiser for the National Independent Venues Association (NIVA), a non-profit organization comprised of thousands of venues in all 50 states who have banded together in support of the Save Our Stages Act.“It’s been eight amazing years,” Shapiro said. “Not quite sure if it has gone by really fast or really slow, but I am psyched to relive it again,”The Capitol Theatre eighth anniversary livestream will also see the venue partner with Conscious Alliance, whose style of fundraising at concerts and festivals has been severely stunted by the pandemic. Conscious Alliance will return with a virtual edition of its “Art That Feeds” food drive, offering a commemorative poster to fans that donate to Conscious Alliance during the stream.“We’re pleased and honored to offer this livestream to help celebrate The Cap’s 8th anniversary,” general manager Bruce Wheeler said. “Our patrons have always been so supportive, it feels good to be able to give back to them this way. It’s amazing how many great acts have graced the stage at The Cap, and we’d like to extend a huge thank you to all of them! Our preference would have been to celebrate together, in person, and we can’t wait for the day until we can all come together again.”A full lineup of performers will be available soon, according to a press release. Tune into the The Capitol Theatre eighth anniversary livestream on September 12th at 1 pm ET, streaming on FANS, Facebook, YouTube, and more.last_img read more

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The Ferryman, Tootsie, Constitution Win 2019 New York Drama Critics’ Circle Awards

first_imgThe New York Drama Critics’ Circle has named The Ferryman by Jez Butterworth best play of the 2018-19 season. Robert Horn and David Yazbek’s Tootsie was given the prize for best musical. What the Constitution Means to Me by Heidi Schreck was named best American play. The selections were made at the organization’s 84th annual voting meeting on May 6. Awards will be presented at a private cocktail reception on May 13.The award for best play carries a cash prize of $2,500; the award for best American play is a cash prize of $1,000. The prizes are made possible by a grant from the Lucille Lortel Foundation.Special citations were voted to theater companies Irish Repertory Theatre and Page 73, as well as the National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene production of Fiddler on the Roof.The Ferryman, directed by Sam Mendes, had its world premiere at the Royal Court Theatre in April 2017 and transferred to the West End’s Gielgud Theatre in June 2017. The play opened at Broadway’s Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre in October 2018.Directed by Scott Ellis, Tootsie made its world premiere at the Cadillac Palace Theatre in Chicago in September 2018. The Broadway production opened at the Marquis Theatre in April 2019.What the Constitution Means to Me, directed by Oliver Butler, received its world premiere at off-Broadway’s New York Theatre Workshop in October 2018 and made its Broadway premiere in March 2019 at the Helen Hayes Theater.The New York Drama Critics’ Circle comprises 19 drama critics from daily newspapers, magazines, wire services and websites based in the New York metropolitan area.The New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award, which has been presented every year since 1936 to the best new play of the season (with optional awards for foreign or American plays, musicals and special achievements), is the nation’s second-oldest theater award, after the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. View Commentslast_img read more

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Come See About Me! Nik Walker & Matt Manuel to Join Broadway’s Ain’t Too Proud

first_img James Harkness Ephraim Sykes View Comments Related Shows from $49.00 Jelani Remy Get ready! Broadway’s hit Temptations musical Ain’t Too Proud will welcome Nik Walker and Matt Manuel to the cast on February 28. They will take over the roles of Otis Williams and David Ruffin, respectively, from Tony nominees Derrick Baskin and MJ-bound Ephraim Sykes, who will take their final bows at the Imperial Theatre on February 26.Walker has previously appeared on stage in Hamilton, Motown: The Musical and Peter and the Starcatcher. Manuel will make his Broadway debut in Ain’t Too Proud; he made his professional acting debut in the national tour of Motown: The Musical.Walker and Manuel will join a principal cast that includes James Harkness as Paul Williams, Jawan M. Jackson as Melvin Franklin and Jelani Remy as Eddie Kendricks.Ain’t Too Proud follows The Temptations’ journey from the streets of Detroit to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. With their signature dance moves and unmistakable harmonies, they rose to the top of the charts creating an amazing 42 Top Ten Hits with 14 reaching number one. Through friendship and betrayal amid the civil unrest that tore America apart, their moving and personal story still resonates five decades later.Featuring a Tony-nominated book by Dominique Morisseau, direction by two-time Tony winner Des McAnuff, Tony-winning choreography by Sergio Trujillo, music direction/arrangements by Kenny Seymour and vocal supervision by Liz Caplan, Ain’t Too Proud features a score made up of The Temptations’ legendary songs including “My Girl,” “Just My Imagination” and “Papa Was a Rolling Stone.” Derrick Baskin Ain’t Too Proud – The Life and Times of The Temptations Nik Walker & Matt Manuel Nik Walker Matt Manuel Star Files Jawan M. Jackson View All (7)last_img read more

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Regulators reinstate some of St Johnsbury hospital’s requested budget

first_imgby Erin Mansfield VTDigger.org(link is external) The state’s health care regulatory board decided Wednesday to increase the upcoming year’s budget for the Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital. The Green Mountain Care Board decided in a 4-1 vote to reinstate some of the St. Johnsbury hospital’s proposed 2016 fiscal year budget. The vote comes one month after it approved $2.3 billion(link is external) in budgets among Vermont’s 14 nonprofit hospitals.The majority of the hospital money approved for disbursement in September went to the UVM Medical Center and Central Vermont Medical Center, but four hospitals had their proposed budgets decreased by the board. The Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital’s total approved was $67.7 million, about $784,000 less than the hospital had requested.Members of the Green Mountain Care Board (from left): Betty Rambur, Allan Ramsay, Al Gobeille, Karen Hein and Con Hogan. Photo by Morgan True/VTDiggerIn percentage terms, the Green Mountain Care Board had asked that Vermont’s 14 private hospitals submit budgets with an aggregate 3.6 percent increase. The board ended up cutting four budgets until the increase was 3.5 percent across all hospitals(link is external). Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital asked for a 5.2-percent increase and received a 3.2-percent increase.A week after the board’s decision, representatives for the Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital sent a letter to the Green Mountain Care Board asking for more money.The hospital’s chief financial officer, Bob Hersey, wrote Sept. 18 that the hospital needed its full requested budget to fund an orthopedic surgeon, a part-time urologist, a primary care physician and an expansion of its pain management program.“The ability of an adequate number of primary care and specialists is closely linked to our mission, which is to improve the health of our community,” Hersey wrote. “Adequate access to appropriate primary and speciality services also improves the patient’s experience, lowers their cost of health care services and helps them better manage their health status.”Hersey wrote that, before the September decision, the Green Mountain Care Board didn’t believe the hospital would get as much revenue from patients if it didn’t hire additional emergency room doctors by Oct. 1. However, he said the additional budget it requested this year had nothing to do with the emergency department, but was part of a multi-year, strategic plan to help the hospital better serve the community.“We would argue that all of the (additional budgeted money) that NVRH will realize (in fiscal year 2016) by adding providers to meet community need would otherwise migrate to (New Hampshire) facilities,” the letter said. “We strongly believe that where practicable, Vermont health care dollars should stay in Vermont, which preserves jobs here and bolsters the economy.”Hersey said on Wednesday that fulfilling Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital’s full budget meant the hospital might come in under budget next year.In a Wednesday afternoon vote at a special meeting, the board decided 4-1 to reinstate the hospital’s budget increase from the approved 3.2 percent rate to the hospital’s proposed 5.2 percent rate. Betty Rambur, a board member and nurse practitioner, was the only dissenting vote.“This is a great example of why a multiyear process is a good idea going forward,” said Jessica Holmes, an economist who sits on the Green Mountain Care Board.Con Hogan, another board member, said, “I hope we don’t wake up next year with four or six hospitals requesting the same thing.”Northwestern Vermont Medical Center in St. Albans, whose proposed fiscal year 2016 budget was cut from $96.1 million to $94.6 million in September, will make a presentation to the board Thursday to ask for more money.last_img read more

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