The pies have it

first_imgHomeNewsThe pies have it The pies have itNew bakery opens in historical Peebles building December 27, 2018Mark CarpenterNews0 By Patricia Beech-It’s 7:30 a.m. and Timothy Smalley, the owner of the Toot’s Sweets Bakery in Peebles, is pulling a fresh batch of fudge brownies from the oven in his tiny commercial kitchen.The smell of warm chocolate wafts through the kitchen door into the small bakery’s store front.“Chocolate fudge brownies are one of our best sellers,” he says. “We go through a lot of them.”He’s waiting for the early crowd that shows up daily for their morning donuts, apple fritters, and cinnamon rolls.“We sell a lot of donuts,” says Smalley. “We make sure we have them fresh every day, from glazed to chocolate covered and cream filled, as well as donut holes and apple fritters.”His day is broken down into a series of customer rushes – the 10 a.m. crowd, the local teachers at noon, the after-school rush, and the right-before-closing rush, which usually consist of just one person with a sweet tooth that needs satisfying.With his Dec. 1 grand opening only three weeks behind him, Smalley says he’s still learning what his customers like and want.He fills his retro display cases daily with an assortment of freshly-baked sweets like cookies and brownies, but occasionally likes to throw in something a little different.“We’re kind of sporadically offering different menu items to determine what people want, ” he says. “Occasionally, I’ll make something like chocolate cupcakes with cherry filling and peanut butter frosting to pique customer’s appetites and wake up their taste buds.”In addition to cookies and candy treats, Toot Sweets offers cakes, pies, homemade breads, and gluten-free products prepared by a local baker.Smalley also provides a nice variety of unique gift shop items such as a chocolate chip cookie mix in decorative mason jars, shortbread in decorative tins, candy cane ornaments, and decorated window frame wreaths.“They’ve sold like hot cakes,” he says. “They’re really great Christmas gifts and stocking stuffers.”A self-described “people person”, Smalley says he wants to keep his entrepreneurial endeavor small, intimate, and inviting.“I want to keep it simple and sweet,” he says. “Customers can come in, get what they’re going to get, enjoy their sweets, and know they’ll always be welcome here,” he says. “If the display case is empty at the end of the day, that means everyone was satisfied, and they had a little bit sweeter day than they had the day before.”Located at 110 Main Street in Peebles, the bakery is housed in one of the village’s oldest buildings.“The town’s first post office and its first library were both located here at different times,” says Smalley. “There’s a lot of history in this building we wanted to preserve, that’s why around the walls we kept the wide plank boards where the library’s shelves stood.”Smalley shopped flea markets and auctions to find unique and eclectic display cases for his menu of sweets and gift shop items.“We wanted a homey feeling,” he says. “We didn’t want to look like just another franchise.”Notwithstanding the lack of ample square footage in the building, Smalley has definite plans for growing his new business.“We don’t have a lot of room, but we plan on adding a cake decorator if I can’t get the hang of it myself,” he says. “Plus, Christmas Eve on Facebook we did a “Like, Comment, and Share Special” to generate interest and business after the holidays have ended.”Meanwhile, Smalley will be spending his days filling 33 pre-Christmas orders for pies, pumpkin rolls, cakes, hard tack candy, fudge and an assortment of other sweets.The 22-year-old, 2015 graduate of Peebles High School is definitely no stranger to work.At age nine he began working at Smalley’s Lake, a recreational facility owned by his late grandfather, William Smalley.“He started me out at $5 an hour doing odd-and-end jobs,” says Smalley, now part owner of the lake. “I worked 13 years for him, and I still love being a part of the lake, but I also believe my Papaw is telling me from above that I need to establish my own legacy.”A trained hair dresser, Smalley also keeps an appointment-only stylist chair at the Studio B Salon & Spa next door. Studio B owner Bonnie Burke leases the bakery space to Smalley.Toot Sweets is open Monday through Saturday from 6 a.m.- 6 p.m. The shop is closed on Sunday while Smalley bakes for the coming week, but he says he’ll gladly open the door if someone stops by.“It’s very fulfilling to start a business,” he says. “It’s also a little uncertain because we’re “small town USA” around here. I’m just hoping that my little spot can help bring life to the town and show others that a small business can succeed and maybe give people hope they can start their own businesses.”For more information or to place an order with Toot Sweets, call Timothy Smalley at (937) 798-1269. Timothy Smalley is the owner of the newly opened Toot’s Sweets Bakery in Peebles. (Photo by Patricia Beech) Top Searches Top Searches ThatMarkSeaman Ohio center_img PreviousSantas in Blue return for a fourth year of shopping funNextWe don’t want to miss the tip off Around the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedThis Weird Method Can Restore Your Vision Naturally (Watch)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Powered By 10 Sec Best Carrot Cake Ever NextStay Best Carrot Cake EverNOW PLAYINGMama’s Deviled EggsNOW PLAYINGApple Pie BitesNOW PLAYINGApple Pie Bites With Caramel SauceNOW PLAYINGOld Fashioned Soft and Buttery Yeast RollsNOW PLAYINGHawaiian Roll Ham SlidersNOW PLAYING5 Easy and Delicious Crock Pot Meatball Appetizer RecipesNOW PLAYINGHomemade Caramel SauceNOW PLAYINGCream Cheese Cake Mix CookiesNOW PLAYINGHow to Slice & Mince Vegetables Like a ProNOW PLAYINGPumpkin Cream Cheese BarsNOW PLAYINGHow to Knead DoughNOW PLAYINGHow to Use a Meat ThermometerNOW PLAYINGSlow Cooker/Crock Pot HintsNOW PLAYINGHow to Quarter a ChickenNOW PLAYINGHow to Clean Garbage DisposalsNOW PLAYINGHow to Clean Stainless Steel SinksNOW PLAYINGHow to Cook Scrambled EggsNOW PLAYINGHow to Peel Hard Boiled EggsNOW PLAYINGHow to Chill a Drink in 2 MinutesNOW PLAYINGHow to Chop an Onion PerfectlyNOW PLAYINGPerfect Bacon Every TimeNOW PLAYINGSweet Alabama PecanbreadNOW PLAYINGParmesan Baked Pork ChopsNOW PLAYINGPrime Rib Roast Au Jus Perfect Every Time! 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New York Governor, Entergy Agree to Close Indian Point Nuclear Plant

first_img Optimizing Plant Performance: The April POWERGEN+ series activates today Previously, Entergy announced the sale of the James A. FitzPatrick nuclear plant in upstate New York, the closure and sale of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant and the shutdowns of the Pilgrim nuclear plant in Massachusetts and the Palisades nuclear plant in Michigan. 1.9.2017 NuclearReactors Twitter TAGSEntergy The New York Times indicated Cuomo will announce other sources of energy will be available by 2021, and that customers won’t feel much impact. Linkedin Entergy announced it will close the two nuclear reactors at Indian Point Energy Center in 2020 and 2021. The closure was announced as part of a settlement with New York State, which will drop legal challenges against the plant. Additionally, the state will support renewal of operating licenses for Indian Point. “For 15 years, I have been deeply concerned by the continuing safety violations at Indian Point, especially given its location in the largest and most densely populated metropolitan region in the country,” Mr. Cuomo said in a prepared statement. “I am proud to have secured this agreement with Entergy to responsibly close the facility.” New York Governor, Entergy Agree to Close Indian Point Nuclear Plant Facebook Linkedin Entergy noted that low energy prices, lower power generation costs for other sources and increased operating costs, including $200 million already invested for license renewal contributed to the decision. Twittercenter_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleTwo Gas-Fired Plants Totaling 1,900 MW Slated for OhioNext articleKemper County Power Plant Cost Surpasses $7 billion chloecox Indian Point, which has an operating capacity of over 2,000 MW, has long been a target of environmental groups, although supporters have said there aren’t adequate substitutes for the carbon-free power it generates. The license renewal will enable Entergy to operate Indian Point through its new shutdown date. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo confirmed the deal Monday. By Editors of Power Engineering “We thank our nearly 1,000 dedicated employees for operating a world-class nuclear power generating facility at top levels of safety, security and reliability, as well as the community for supporting us,” said Leo Denault, Entergy’s chairman and chief executive officer. “We are committed to treating our employees fairly and will help those interested in other opportunities to relocate within the Entergy system.” The shutdown will complete Entergy’s exit from its merchant power business due to low wholesale energy prices. Suitors for halted Bellefonte nuclear project ask TVA to consider climate in reviving sale New Jersey utility regulators extend zero-carbon breaks for PSEG nuclear power plants Facebook By chloecox – The deal was an agreement between Entergy, the governor’s office, the office of New York attorney general Eric Schneiderman and environmental group Riverkeeper, the New York Times reported. No posts to displaylast_img read more

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Sarah Johnstone Joins Wingberry Farms Team

first_img Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! Horse Sport Enews We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. SIGN UP Email* Young show jumping talent Sarah Johnstone has joined Wingberry Farms as a trainer at its world-class facility in King City, ON.Johnstone, 23, of Aurora, ON, will work alongside Wingberry Farms Head Trainer Yann Candele. Her primary focus will be training both horses and riders for the jumper, hunter, equitation and pony divisions. She will also be involved with sales, leasing and buying for clients, and organizing competition and travel schedules.“We are very excited to have Sarah join our team,” said Shawn Littler, Owner and Operator of Wingberry Farms. “We have always admired her riding and professionalism within the industry. Adding Sarah to our team gives us the opportunity to become more diversified, as she can ride as well as train our hunter, equitation and pony clients.”Candele, who joined the Wingberry Farms in 2013 as its Head Trainer, recently competed as a member of Canada’s eighth-placed team at the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games, held August 23 to September 7 in Normandy, France.“Sarah is an up and coming rider, very talented and dedicated to the sport,” said Candele, 43, the reigning four-time Canadian Show Jumping Champion. “I think she will make a great addition to our team.”A devoted young professional, Johnstone got her start as a working student with two-time Canadian Olympian Jay Hayes. In 2006, she won both the CET Medal Final and Jump Canada Medal Final at the Royal Horse Show in Toronto, ON. She claimed her first victory in International Equestrian Federation (FEI) competition in 2011 before spending 2012 based in The Netherlands with Dutch Olympian Emile Hendrix and his brother Paul, who operate a large international training and sales business. There, Johnstone qualified two horses for the 2012 World Breeding Championships Young Horse Finals. Upon her return to Canada, Johnstone joined Canadian Olympian Beth Underhill at her Beth Underhill Stables in Schomberg, ON.“I have absolutely loved working for Beth; she is a true horse woman, an unbelievable trainer, and a world-class rider,” said Johnstone, whose future potential was recognized when the North American Riders Group (NARG) selected her from 40 applicants as the 2012 recipient of its inaugural $15,000 Rider’s Grant. “I look forward to taking the knowledge and experience I gained from working with Beth and contributing it to the Wingberry team.”Johnstone continued, “I look forward to my partnership with the Littler family; I admire their enthusiasm and commitment to the sport. Yann has always been a rider that I have studied, and there is no doubt that he is one of the best. I can’t wait to work with him at Wingberry Farms, and believe that we will make a great team!”Situated on 100 acres approximately 25 minutes from Toronto, Wingberry Farms boasts 35 large stalls outfitted with SoftStall’s rubber matting system. Riding facilities include a large heated indoor arena with natural lighting and TravelRight footing, an outdoor sand arena with TR2 footing, and a grass grand prix field featuring natural obstacles and water jumps. In addition to its own trail system, Wingberry Farms backs on to approximately 500 acres of additional scenic hacking. Large grass paddocks allow for plenty of turn-out, while on-site staff ensures equine comfort and safety 24 hours a day.For more information on Wingberry Farms, including training opportunities, please visit www.wingberryfarms.com. Tags: Yann Candele, Sarah Johnstone, Wingberry Farms, More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business.last_img read more

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Assistant Clinical or Associate Clinical Professor

first_imgAll applicants must apply online at www.msujobs.msstate.edu andattach a cover letter, curriculum vitae and the complete contactinformation for at least 3 references. Inquiries should be directedto the Search Committee Chair, Dr. Rosalind Operton. Any socialsecurity numbers included on requested transcripts should beredacted prior to submitting online.Equal Employment Opportunity Statement:MSU is an equal opportunity employer, and all qualified applicantswill receive consideration for employment without regard to race,color, ethnicity, sex, religion, national origin, disability, age,sexual orientation, genetic information, pregnancy, genderidentity, status as a U.S. veteran, and/or any other statusprotected by applicable law. We always welcome nominations andapplications from women, members of any minority group, and otherswho share our passion for building a diverse community thatreflects the diversity in our student population. Position Function:Teaching and service/outreach.Salary Grade : UCPlease see Staff Compensation Structure orSkilled Crafts and ServiceMaintenance Compensation Schedule for salary ranges. For salarygrade UC, these positions are “Unclassified” and salary ranges aredetermined by the hiring department.Department Profile:Visit http://www.meridian.msstate.edu/academics/Area of Specialization:Educational LeadershipAnticipated Appointment Date:August 16, 2021Tenure Track Status:Non-Tenure TrackEssential Duties and Responsibilities:Teach graduate level courses in Educational Leadership andundergraduate in Educational Psychology, Foundations, SpecialEducation, Elementary Education and/or Secondary Education; utilizeonline learning resources in the classroom; advise students; serveon graduate program committees; supervise interns; collaborate withlocal school districts; provide service to the Division ofEducation, the University and the profession; seek external fundingto support teaching and service activities; perform other duties asassigned that support the mission of the Division and theUniversity.Minimum Qualifications:Doctorate in Educational Leadership or related field; eligible forlicensure in School Administration in Mississippi; experience as aK-12 administrator; minimum of 3 years of teaching experience inthe PK-12 setting.ABDs or degree pending considered (all but DISS):YesPreferred Qualifications:Graduate degree in Secondary Education; evidence of high-qualityuniversity level teaching; greater than 3 years of PK-12 teachingexperience; experience with online learning formats; experiencewith the Educational Leadership program accreditation process;eligibility for licensure in teaching one or more PK-12 subjectareas.Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:Knowledge of current issues and trends in the field of EducationalLeadership; skill in teaching; ability to collaborate effectivelywith colleagues.Instructions for Applying:Link to apply: http://explore.msujobs.msstate.edu/last_img read more

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Tough times for Stagecoach

first_imgStagecoach Group is facing tough times, according to its latest trading update, but remains on course to meet its goals announced in December.Revenue growth for the 40 weeks to the end of February was -0.1% in regional bus, -4.3% in London bus, -0.6% in USA/Canada, 3.2% in UK Rail and 2.8% at Virgin Rail.Trading at our UK Bus (regional operations) “continues to reflect the actions we took in early 2017 to adjust our pricing and services to respond to changes in customer demand,” says Stagecoach.Vehicle miles operated were 2.9% lower. Revenue per vehicle mile grew 2.9%, journeys per vehicle mile grew 0.2% and revenue per journey increased 2.7%. “We continue to maintain our focus on controlling costs.”The like-for-like revenue growth has been suppressed in recent weeks by the widespread snowstorms. During the most recent four-week period, like-for-like revenue declined by 2.5% from the equivalent prior year period, “illustrating the scale of the impact of these extreme weather conditions, on UK BusThe reported revenue decrease for the UK Bus (London) is in line with expectation and reflects the impact of contracts lost in the prior year.  “We remain satisfied by our performance on current year tenders for Transport for London contracts,” it adds.last_img read more

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Chernobyl: City of ghosts

first_imgThe new containment dome covering the destroyed reactor at Chernobyl nuclear power station | Brendan Hoffman/AFP via Getty ImagesIn 2015, Ukraine introduced a series of laws designed to de-communize the country. Soviet street names were changed to Ukrainian ones. Statues of Lenin were torn down. But here nothing has changed. “Why has no one torn this Lenin down?” an Australian visitor asked. “Why would you bother?” replied Yevgeny.Further down the road is a memorial park. Rows of signs, each a simple white rectangle bearing a name bolted to a pole, stand like headstones in memory of the 97 villages that ceased to exist after the disaster. For many in those early days, the evacuation brought back traumatic memories. Buses arrived to take them away; no one told them what was happening or where they were going. For some, it was the Nazi occupation all over again.We head to the forests that cover 70 percent of the exclusion zone. With no one there to look after them, foliage slowly burst through buildings and roads to almost completely smother what was once a teeming urban center. As human life has declined in Chernobyl, however, animal life has increased. Bears, deer, lynx, wild boars all roam here. But they are not for hunting — each is little more than a vessel of irradiated meat.A children’s seesaw stands among abandoned apartment buildings in Pripyat | Sean Gallup/Getty ImagesIn the forest is what was once a kindergarten. On the approach, a doll with three limbs missing lies a few feet from a sign warning of radiation. The scene is Chernobyl in miniature: human existence almost instantly snuffed out by the most potent force humanity has ever unleashed.Inside is a vista of decay — seemingly ancient but alarmingly timeless, like some latter day Pompeii. Only the rotting floorboards, thick layers of dust and rusting metal have changed. In the kindergarten’s dormitory, there are rows of bunk beds. Some still have toys on them. Children’s drawings are taped to the walls. On the floor lie several tiny shoes.* * * PRIPYAT, Ukraine — In a post-Cold War world, the fear of nuclear holocaust has receded from the global consciousness. Donald Trump’s threat of unleashing “fire and fury like the world has never seen” against North Korea was an untimely and unwelcome reminder of a past, perilous era. Even by Trump’s standards these statements were a new low. And they are dangerous. History teaches us that the journey from political logorrhea to global disaster can be terrifyingly short.As demagogues toss around nuclear threats like confetti at a wedding, it is easy to forget the devastation nuclear power can cause. But in one country, on Europe’s edge, they have not forgotten. And where once life thrived, there now stands a vast mausoleum.The city of Chernobyl lies about 90 kilometers from Ukraine’s capital, Kiev. It’s an ancient site — originally part of the land of Kievan Rus, the federation of Slavic tribes from whom modern Russians, Belarusians and Ukrainians all claim descent. In modern times the city was chosen as the site of the first nuclear power plant in Ukraine (then part of the USSR). Inside, the area is divided into two buffer zones, the first of which covers 30 square kilometers. The second, inner sector is 10 square kilometers and stretches around reactor number 4.Chernobyl once had a population of 14,000; now it’s just 688 mostly older people who returned after the clean-up. The remaining reactors continued to operate for years after the disaster, the last closing in 2000. Workers are still allowed inside reactor 4 but their time inside is limited to protect them from radiation.“Don’t drink water from the river,” our guide, Yevgeny, instructs us — somewhat needlessly. My Geiger counter (a device that measures radiation) reads 0.12 microsieverts. On average, a person safely absorbs about 3.65 millisieverts (there are 1,000 microsieverts to a millisievert) merely by living in a brick or concrete building.We get into a van to drive to Chernobyl. After passing through the village of Zalisya (now almost entirely covered in thick shrubbery) we arrive — and go immediately back in time. The sign at the city’s outskirts reads simply: “Chernobyl.” Written vertically, it is accompanied by the USSR’s hammer and sickle. The Geiger counter now reads 0.22 microsieverts. Reactor 4 is a mere 18 kilometers away.We drive down the city’s main road — Soviet Street — and pull up at a square. Yevgeny says we need to park carefully. The traffic police here are so bored they hand out tickets just for something to do.The square is immaculate. There is not a single piece of litter on the ground. The silence is near total; the streets seemingly scrubbed clean of all humanity. The odd vehicle drives past. At one corner of the square is a statue of Vladimir Lenin, his left hand clutching his lapel, his right thrust into his pocket. A sign warns of radiation contamination near former apartment buildings in Pripyat | Sean Gallup/Getty ImagesThe plant had four nuclear reactors and on April 26, 1986, reactor number 4 blew up during a test. The Soviets were initially reluctant to make the disaster public, but had no choice when nuclear reactors a thousand miles away in eastern Sweden began recording radiation levels 10 times higher than normal. Fire from the explosion had sent plumes of highly radioactive fallout across the USSR and Europe.Eventually, almost half a million people would come to be involved in the clean-up operation, which would last for months and cost an estimated 18 billion rubles (back when a ruble was equal to a U.S. dollar), playing its part in the eventual bankruptcy of the Soviet Union.People attend a commemoration on April 26, 2016, of the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear accident | Brendan Hoffman/Getty ImagesChernobyl was the most disastrous nuclear power plant accident in history. It wiped out two cities and even now the full extent of the casualties isn’t known. Most of the first responders died: two that night, with many more over the subsequent weeks and months. Their efforts, however, were arguably the most invaluable in modern history: they succeeded in preventing a second explosion that could have destroyed half of Europe. They died so that we might live.* * *Near Chernobyl is the city of Pripyat. Founded in 1970, it was the ninth Soviet nuclear city — built to accommodate the workers at the Chernobyl plant and their families. At the time of the disaster, Pripyat had a population of just under 50,000. Now both towns are surrounded by an exclusion zone that spans 2,600 square kilometers, put in place to prevent anyone from wandering into the contaminated area. Official permits are required to enter the zone.Anna Zayika for POLITICOAt the edge of the zone is a checkpoint manned by five armed guards. Two orange and white barriers, of the type used in car parks, block the road. Anyone wishing to enter must have their bags searched and identification checked, to be ticked off against a list of those granted permission to proceed. The giant stainless steel sarcophagus that covers reactor 4 gleams in the dappled sunlight. We are now in the inner buffer sector, just 100 meters from where it all began. The sarcophagus was built to cover an older one, built from concrete, and was installed late last year. It weighs 37,000 tonnes and the Statue of Liberty could comfortably fit inside. It’s the largest movable building in the world.Anna Zayika for POLITICONext to the reactor stands an old building. Its external fire escapes seem connected to it by rust alone and the steps are surrounded by splashes of reddish brown that have splayed out like a blood spatter. Nearby is an artificial lake that was used as a cooling system for the reactors. Now it is filled with fish grown far beyond their normal size. Normally, they would have been caught and eaten but that is simply not possible. “They are not fish,” says Yevgeny, “they are swimming pieces of radioactive waste.”As we depart, I take a final look at the forests that cover most of the area, and I finally understand that this is what nuclear holocaust looks like: it’s not the flat, arid wastelands of Mad Max, it’s the earth (eventually) bursting back into life, wresting back control from mankind’s stupidity.David Patrikarakos is a contributing writer at POLITICO. Also On POLITICO testimony Chernobyl poisoned my childhood By Zoya Sheftalovich Anatomy of a crisis: The North Korea threat By Jeremy C.F. Lin, Sarah Frostenson, Tyler Fisher and Jon McClurelast_img read more

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HSPH’s Bloom named recipient of national award

first_imgBarry R. Bloom, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Joan L. and Julius H. Jacobson Professor of Public Health at the Harvard School of Public Health, will receive the 2009 Prix Galien USA Pro Bono Humanum award at a ceremony on Sept. 30 at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City for “bringing the best of modern biological and economic science to the poorest corners of the globe.” The ceremony will be emceed by broadcast journalist Charlie Rose.The Prix Galien USA recognizes the technical, scientific, and clinical research skills necessary to develop innovative medicines. The award committee comprises 11 individuals, including seven Nobel Laureates.Prior to the event, there will be a roundtable discussion about improving human health through innovative science and clinical research featuring Prix Galien USA candidates and Pro Bono Humanum winners.Read full storylast_img read more

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Analysis: More jobs, clustered in low-wage sectors

first_imgAs during much of 2013, Vermont’s November employment numbers released Friday by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics provide a mixed message. The unemployment rate inched down to 4.4 percent, mainly because fewer Vermonters are looking for work. At the same time, employers reported 2,200 more Vermonters on the job than in October, with most of those newcomers in traditionally low-wage service sectors.‘ Private sector: Waning gainsIn 2009, in the depths of the recession, Vermont’s private sector created 20,000 new jobs and shed 30,000’a net loss of 10,000. During the 12 months that ended in March 2012, Vermont saw a net gain of almost 5,000 private sector jobs. In the year ending March 2013, job growth slowed again. The private sector created nearly 22,300 jobs, but lost almost 20,000 during the same period through business closings or layoffs.So many applicants, so few jobsFewer jobs mean more competition for job-seekers. In the fall of 2007, there were about nine unemployed workers for every five job openings in the Northeast. In October 2013, the competition was nearly twice as fierce’17 job-seekers per five openings. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics does not keep job opening data on individual states. The Northeast region includes the New England states, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.Source: Public Assetts Institute, Montpelier. 12.20.2013http://publicassets.org/library/publications/monthly-jobs-report/dec-20-…(link is external)last_img read more

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New book Ageless Strength: helps combat effects of ageing in athletes…

first_img Related A new strength training program reveals ‘the three keys that counteract the effects of ageing in masters athletes and those who pursue an active lifestyle’. Ageless Strength: Strong and Fit for a Lifetime by endurance sports coach and personal trainer Jeff Horowitz offers a ‘dynamic and engaging strength training program that fights back against the years’. Published by VeloPress, Ageless Strength is now available in bookstores and online.According to the book blurb….It’s a myth that our older years only bring physical decline. While it’s true that we lose strength, bone density, and balance, our bodies react the same way to training at any age. The answer is not to go easy on our so-called fragile bodies – that traditional approach of gentle, easy fitness just guarantees decline. The key is to push our bodies in the right ways. A smart mix of strength training can counteract the effects of ageing – and keep anyone strong and fit for years. With the program in Ageless Strength, anyone of any age can get into the best shape of their life.Ageless Strength shares over 50 simple strength exercises that build strength, bone, and balance – combating the top three physical changes that can leave masters athletes underpowered or injured. Each exercise uses bodyweight or minimal equipment so that no gym membership is required. A 6-week quick-start program gets athletes up to speed so they can follow a long-term strength program or select from the colour-coded exercises to design their own.In just two 30-minute sessions a week, ‘Ageless Strength offers a simple, effective way to get stronger and fitter for a lifetime of active pursuits’.Ageless Strength: Strong and Fit for a LifetimeJeff HorowitzPaperback with full-color interior and photographs throughout.7? x 9?, 216 pp., $19.95, 9781937715717Jeff Horowitz is a certified running, cycling and triathlon coach and a personal trainer who has run more than 175 marathons and ultramarathons across six continents. Formerly an attorney, he quit law to pursue his passion for endurance sport and now works with at-risk youth in Washington, DC, and around the world. He also coaches Team Hope, a charity fund-raising training group that benefits the Hope Connections Center, which provides free counselling and services to cancer patients and survivors.VeloPress is a leading publisher of books about endurance sports. Focused on cycling, triathlon, running and swimming, VeloPress books help committed athletes achieve their goals of going faster and farther. VeloPress authors are top experts in their fields and the publisher’s clearly illustrated books ‘help athletes develop the knowledge, fitness and skills to meet any challenge’.www.velopress.com/agelesslast_img read more

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Despite service issues, Roeland Park advances new waste collection contract with WCA; rates to increase if finalized

first_imgBy Holly CookRoeland Park inched closer to finalizing a waste management contract Monday after the city council unanimously voted in favor of adopting a resolution to approve a sub-agreement for solid waste services.The sub-agreement allows the Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) to move forward with negotiations on behalf of Roeland Park with a five-year agreement with WCA. The cities of Fairway and Westwood, who are participating in the joint bid, will also need to approve sub-agreements.The proposed agreement includes a three-year contract with two additional one-year renewal options. The service would cost homeowners $15.17 per month through the end of 2020, which is 21 percent higher than the current rate. A city staff report recommended staying with WCA even though doing so would be “unsavory especially in light of the rate increase,” as WCA’s proposal was 10 percent lower than any other bids.The report also acknowledged recent service from the company “has not met expectations.” The agreement outlines penalties for WCA if the company fails to provide adequate service. Fines range from $25 to $100 for poor service to individual homes and $500 for failing to provide service to neighborhoods or the entire community. WCA will also employ a new monitoring system under the contract that uses RFID readers to track WCA-provided trash and recycling carts. Smaller recycling bins and yard waste containers will not have the technology. The tracking system allows WCA to track container movement and log collection data. Councilmembers have debated the waste contract at length, first clashing on whether the city should use MARC to negotiate a new agreement, and then disagreeing on whether the city should continue working with WCA. Councilmember Ryan Kellerman repeatedly emphasized he had received poor service from WCA and that he had heard numerous residents complain about the service.During Monday’s meeting Kellerman pressed for greater clarification on what items were and were not permissible for pickup. WCA representatives agreed to provide more detailed information to residents on their services and suggested adding a link to the city’s website that would field residents’ trash-related questions directly to WCA. Kellerman suggested amending the sub-agreement so that it provided greater clarity. City administrator Keith Moody said while it was possible to make guidelines more precise, the broader language put the city in a better legal position.Councilmember Teresa Kelly said she thought the council should approve the agreement as written. Kellerman remained skeptical about supporting the agreement.“I just wish I could have some sort of guarantee,” he said.Councilmember Michael Poppa then made a motion to call the question, effectively forcing a vote. Councilmember Michael Rhoades seconded the motion and the vote proceeded with the approval passing unanimously.last_img read more

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