British dealmakers considerably increase their activity overseas

first_img Show Comments ▼ Sunday 14 December 2014 11:18 pm WHILE deal making in Britain has seen a small increase in activity this year, domestic dealmakers acquiring assets overseas have increased considerably, according to data analysis by EY released today.The acquisitions have been driven by corporates ­ across a few sectors ­ keen to reposition their business models in a low-growth world.The volume of deals in 2014 was up 5.3 per cent to 2,726 when compared with last year. However, overseas deals completed by UK companies saw a 16 per cent increase over the same period, from 641 to 766, with values increasing by nearly 60 per cent from $44.5bn (£28.3bn) to $105.5bn, catapulting Britain to second most active overseas acquirer ahead of Germany, Japan and China, and second only to the US.The cumulative value of all deals completed over 2014 has also risen by nearly 70 per cent to $260.7bn, driven primarily by consumer products and retail, life sciences, property and telecommunications sectors.Mark Gregory, EY’s chief economist and transaction partner, said: “Confidence in the economy is certainly ahead of action and this is demonstrated by the low levels of M&A this year. Globally, across all markets and sectors there are risks and potential shocks that have dented corporate confidence.”He added: “Telcos have been acquiring assets to grow their revenues globally and to steal a march in the race for technology convergence. Those in life sciences have taken advantage of the benefits offered by tax inversions and many deals have been driven by the need to find the next blockbuster drug. And consumer products have been repositioning their business models in the face of lower growth in more mature markets, with investments in new products and higher growth new markets.” Joseph Millis whatsapp Read This Next’A Quiet Place Part II’ Sets Pandemic Record in Debut WeekendFamily ProofHiking Gadgets: Amazon Deals Perfect For Your Next AdventureFamily ProofAmazon roars for MGM’s lion, paying $8.45 billion for studio behind JamesFamily ProofIndian Spiced Vegetable Nuggets: Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofCheese Crostini: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofHomemade Tomato Soup: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofWhat to Know About ‘Loki’ Ahead of Disney+ Premier on June 9Family ProofChicken Bao: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofBaked Sesame Salmon: Recipes Worth CookingFamily Proof British dealmakers considerably increase their activity overseas whatsapp Share Tags: NULLlast_img read more

Read More →

Comment / MEPC environmental regulatory failures will put the heat under the IMO

first_imgPhoto 156500990 © Anastasia Yakovleva | Dreamstime.com By Nick Savvides 15/06/2021 If ever the International Maritime Organization (IMO) needed regional regulation, it was at yesterday’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) meeting.The industry seemed to be making light of the climate crisis and metaphorically rowed back on emissions targets.Rich pickings were served to those who argue that the maritime industry is incapable of regulating itself, and that the sector needs regional regulation to drive it on to meet its climate responsibilities.Time and again delegates called for carbon intensity indicator (CII) targets to be set at 22%, but in the end the narrow majority decision was to cut the target in half, reaching a meagre 11% when the review date on 1 January 2026 arrives.Moreover, The Netherlands described the enforcement regime that will accompany the new targets as “soft”.Delegates voted to maintain the IMO’s spirit of co-operation and compromise, in what can only be described as a ‘scorched Earth policy’ to reduce carbon intensity targets to what many considered as negligible limits – and seemingly with limited enforcement options.Delegates raised their cards to speak on the issue en masse. But perhaps the day’s most poignant comment inadvertently came from MEPC’s moderator, informing  that a communications link had been cut: “We’ve lost the Philippines,” she said, with no hint of irony.Meanwhile, the Solomon Islands had quoted UN secretary general António Guterres’ recent comment, “when you’re on the edge of the abyss, you need to make sure your next step is in the right direction”.Even the US, not averse to digging its own abysses in the recent past, could not support projected targets, which would see annual carbon intensity levels progressively diminish from 2019 to 2022 by one, two and three per cent consecutively, then in two percentage points of five, seven, nine and eleven by 2026.The bind the IMO finds itself in is understandable; that the least-developed countries (LDCs) and small island developing states (SIDS) in particular rely heavily on the maritime sector for critical supplies. SIDS have already been adversely affected by the massive rise in the cost of shipping.Remote island populations are also often served by older, less-efficient tonnage and are expected to see costs rise further as the new short-term measures of the Energy Efficiency Existing Ships Index (EEXI) and CII become mandatory in January 2023.It has been known for some years that the greatest burden of environmental measures would fall on the countries least able to manage the increased cost. But rather than deal with the difficulties facing SIDS, which want to see greater levels of ambition from the IMO, the UN body chose to fudge the issue again.It was fitting that the debate was approaching midnight in the chair’s native Japan when the majority vote was announced by the MEPC’s presiding officer, who merely said the guidelines had been adopted by majority vote.In the background, the clock was ticking towards the witching hour. Perhaps the industry has one final opportunity to make good on its responsibilities to meet the Paris goals and to decarbonise at a rate commensurate with the global climate crisis that remains a reality. In 2026, a review of the decarbonisation process will be undertaken. Changes made, to meet the 2030 targets of a 40% reduction in carbon intensity in the IMO’s own initial strategy, will be vitally important.Many delegates pointed out, however, that while the phased proposals were well supported within the group, the slashing of intensity targets by half will leave the industry with a lot of ground to make up by 2030.Fundamental changes to the reduction targets have left the industry exposed to those outside business, many of whom are demanding the maritime sector make greater and faster progress on its climate actions and claim the industry is incapable of governing itself.For some, any regional regulations that drive the maritime sector forward at the pace necessary to meet the Paris goals of maintaining global warming at or below 1.5˚C, will be considered critical.As the clock moves to five to midnight, the maritime sector must face its bete noire – environmentalists calling for climate justice. If shipping is to show the world it is a responsible industry, it needs to actually make the hard decisions.The heat is on. And failure will be costly. Like the drunken Tam O’Shanter, chased by witches in Robbie Burns’ timeless rhyme, “thy’ll get thy fairin in hell they’ll roast thee like a herrin”.last_img read more

Read More →

Drive-thru COVID-19 testing to be offered in Golden Gate

first_imgSuspect runs from traffic stop in Golden Gate June 1, 2021 Deputies investigate overnight shooting in Golden Gate June 10, 2021 Local medical leaders host town hall on COVID-19 vaccines today May 25, 2021 AdvertisementFace coverings and a photo ID are required. Results are expected in 3-5 business days. Brush fire ignites near Golden Gate church June 4, 2021 GOLDEN GATE, Fla. – The Healthcare Network will be holding free drive-thru COVID-19 testing on Saturday, Jan. 23 in Golden Gate.Testing will be held at Healthcare Network’s Nichols Community Health Center, located at 12655 Collier Boulevard, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.Testing will be available on a first-come, first-served basis, for up to 200 people of all ages, regardless of symptoms. Physician or provider referral is not required and those wishing to be tested do not have to be patients of Healthcare Network. RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementTags: COVID-19 testingGolden Gatehealthcare network AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 commentsDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 commentslast_img read more

Read More →

Here are all of this week’s Laois GAA fixtures

first_imgHome Sport GAA Here are all of this week’s Laois GAA fixtures SportGAAGaelic FootballHurling Five Laois monuments to receive almost €200,000 in government funding Midlands Park Hotel U-17 Football League Division 1(Minor Inter County Players Available)Portlaoise v Portarlington in Rathleague at 7pmSATURDAY, MARCH 24All games at 4.30pm with first-named team at home unless stated otherwise Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ Pinterest Laois Shopping Centre ACFL Division 1BArles-Kilcruise v Ballyroan-Abbey 3pmLaois Shopping Centre ACFL Division 3The Heath v KilleshinBallylinan v Ballyroan AbbeyThe Rock v O’DempseysMountmellick v Timahoe Community TAGSLaois GAA Fixtures Facebook Previous articleLaois GAA announce plans for expansive fundraising ventureNext articleMy Farming Life: Meet the woman steeped in the Macra, Teaching and farming Steven Millerhttp://www.laoistoday.ieSteven Miller is owner and managing editor of LaoisToday.ie. From Laois, Steven studied Journalism in DCU and has 14 years experience in the media, almost 10 of those in an editorial role. Husband of Emily, father of William and Lillian, he’s happiest when he’s telling stories or kicking a point. Laois Shopping Centre ACHL Division 3Rathdowney-Errill  v Borris-KilcottonBallinakill v BallypickasPortlaoise v CamrossSUNDAY, MARCH 25Allianz Football League Division 4 Round 7Laois V Carlow in Netwatch Cullen Park at 1pmLaois Shopping Centre ACFL Division 1Ballylinan v  O’Dempseys at 4pmThe Heath v Graiguecullen at 5pmLaois Shopping Centre ACFL Division 3Portlaoise v Portarlington at 4pmLaois Shopping Centre ACHL Division 1(Senior Inter County Hurlers Available)Abbeyleix v The Harps at 4pmCastletown v Camross at 4pmPortlaoise v Rathdowney Errill at 12noonBorris-Kilcotton v Clough-Ballacolla at 4pmLaois Shopping Centre ACHL Division 1A Senior Inter County Hurlers AvailableBallinakill v ClonadBallyfin v RosenallisColt v MountrathLaois Shopping Centre ACHL Division 2(Senior Inter County Hurlers Available)Slieve Bloom v Mountmellick at 4pmShanahoe v Trumera at 4pmMidlands Park Hotel U-17 Hurling League Division 2Minor Inter County Players AvailableCastletown-Slieve Bloom v Borris-Kilcotton at 11amMidlands Park Hotel U-13 Football League Division 1St Joseph’s v St Pauls at 11amPortlaoise v Stradbally Parish Gaels at 4pmKilleshin Crettyard v Kilcavan at 11amBallyroan Abbey v Portarlington at 11amBallylinan v Graiguecullen at 11amMidlands Park Hotel U-13 Football League Division 2Camross v Clough-Ballacolla at 11amClonaslee v Ballyfin at 11amRosenallis v Castletown-Slieve Bloom at 11amMidlands Park Hotel U-13 Football League Division 2The Heath v Mountmellick at 11amNa Fianna Og v O’Dempseys at 11amPark Ratheniska v The Harps at 11amMONDAY, MARCH 26All games at 6.30pm with first-named team at home unless stated otherwiseMidlands Park Hotel U-13 Football League Division 3St Pauls v SpinkThe Rock v Ballyroan AbbeyO’Dempseys v Stradbally Parish GaelsSEE ALSO – This is what I’m Studying:  Meet the Stradbally girl studying Vetinary in UCD Ten Laois based players named on Leinster rugby U-18 girls squad Facebookcenter_img WhatsApp By Steven Miller – 19th March 2018 Community WhatsApp With the snow hopefully beginning to melt there is another busy schedule of games across the Laois GAA calendar.WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21Midlands Park Hotel U-13 Football League Division 3Stradbally Parish Gaels v The Rock in Stradbally at 7pmFRIDAY, MARCH 23Laois Shopping Centre ACFL Division 1 Round 1Portarlington v Stradbally at 7.45pm Rugby Twitter Twitter Here are all of this week’s Laois GAA fixtures Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

Read More →

The most popular name for boys and girls in Laois have been revealed

first_img TAGSbaby namesCSO RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Community Previous articleElection Diary: New LED streetlights, calls for a reduction in the speed limit on the N80 and email issuesNext articleOver 790 children in Laois waiting more than a year for occupational therapy – Stanley Siun Lennonhttp://heresosiun.blogspot.ie/2016/09/the-lekkie-piccie-experience.htmlSiún Lennon joined LaoisToday in a full-time capacity after studying Journalism and New Media in the University of Limerick. She hails from Rosenallis and her interests vary from news, sports and politics. Community WhatsApp Emily and Jack were the most common baby names in Laois for 2018.This is according to the Central Statistics Office, which released the list of most common names for newborns on Tuesday, February 26.Laois is keeping with the national trend, as Emily and Jack were marked as the most common baby names in the entire country.For the 11th consecutive year, Jack holds the top spot for boys’ names, with over 680 boys being given the name Jack last year.Emily remains the most popular baby name for girls as it has been since 2010.James was the second most popular name for a boy, the same position it held last year, while Grace moves into second place for the girls.Also appearing in the top five for boys are Noah, Conor and Daniel. Emma, Sophie and Amelia complete the top five girls’ names.SEE ALSO – In Pictures: Huge crowd turn out in Vicarstown to celebrate 90th birthday of legendary local character By Siun Lennon – 1st March 2019 Facebook Facebook The most popular name for boys and girls in Laois have been revealed Pinterest WhatsApp Laois secondary school announces scholarship winners for new academic year Twitter Council Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official opening Twitter Home News Community The most popular name for boys and girls in Laois have been… NewsCommunitylast_img read more

Read More →

Business rent aid to fall short of budget: PBO

first_img A federal spending watchdog says a program aiming to providing rent relief to small and medium-sized businesses will cost just under $1 billion this fiscal year.The report this morning from the parliamentary budget officer says the commercial rental-assistance program will now cost $931 million after it was extended through to August. Canadian Press Share this article and your comments with peers on social media The updated spending projections from the parliamentary budget office still put the program on a track to provide less help than the nearly $3 billion the Liberals budgeted.The program provides forgivable loans that cover half of the rent for eligible small businesses, and also requires landlords to waive a further one-quarter of what they’d otherwise be owed.The Canadian Federation of Independent Business warned that too many small businesses still haven’t been able to access the help because it relies on landlords to apply and sets a very high bar for revenue losses to qualify.The association had asked the government to allow tenants to directly apply for help, or make changes to a small-business loan program so that more of the outstanding amount could be forgiven if paid back on time.Aiming to help businesses in a different way, the Liberals on Monday announced an extension of the Canada Emergency Business Account until the end of October.Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland also said that the government is working with financial institutions to expand eligibility to companies that have been shut out of the program, including those who use personal rather than business bank accounts.The government had said in mid-May that it was working to address that particular issue.Freeland said details about eligibility changes will be released in the coming days.The government said that the business loan program has provided more than $29 billion in credit through more than 730,000 loans.Eligible businesses can receive interest-free loans of up to $40,000 through the program, and have one-quarter of the outstanding amount forgiven if the balance is repaid by Dec. 31, 2022. Man and woman sitting in cafeteria discussing finance for the month. Stressed couple looking at bills sitting in restaurant wearing uniform apron. Cafe staff sitting together looking at expenses and bills. (Man and woman sitting in cafeteria discussi iStock Covid vaccine-sharing discussions to dominate G7 summit talks Related news Government to reimburse self-employed workers who repaid CERB Keywords Small business,  Coronavirus Virtual meetings to continue post-pandemic in B.C. Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Read More →

CTU backs stronger Māori representation in local democracy

first_imgCTU backs stronger Māori representation in local democracy The Council of Trade Unions Te Kauae Kaimahi welcomes the Government’s introduction of the Local Electoral (Māori Wards and Māori Constituencies) Amendment Bill as a much needed leveling of the playing field for Māori representation.CTU Vice-President Māori Syd Keepa says the elimination of the current double standard for wards is long overdue. “There’s no reason there should be a different, more difficult, set of rules for creating a Māori ward than a general ward other than to create an extra barrier to representation for Māori.“That can be seen in the way the binding referendum process has been used to stop the creation of Māori wards in councils around Aotearoa New Zealand. It’s wrong and it sets us back as a people, Māori and non-Māori, and as a nation.“This law change will take that barrier away and is a very important step toward establishing fair Māori representation in local decision making and honoring the Crown’s commitment to Te Tiriti.“We thank the government, and Minister Mahuta, for showing good faith toward our people and restoring some justice to our local democracies.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:amendment, council, Council of Trade Unions, Government, justice, law, Minister, New Zealand, referendum, trade, trade unionlast_img read more

Read More →

Seismic science investment to avert next crisis

first_imgSeismic science investment to avert next crisis A once-in-a-generation seismic investment in science in the 2021 Budget would be a defining legacy for the Government, securing the science heft needed to face the next challenges after COVID-19.A new $2.4 billion research translation and commercialisation fund would be a powerful vehicle to turn more of Australia’s world-class university research into products, services and jobs with deeper industry-university collaboration.In its pre-Budget submission, Science & Technology Australia proposes a strategic investment to boost job creation, strengthen sovereign capability and turbo-charge the economic recovery.Science & Technology Australia Chief Executive Officer Misha Schubert said a research translation and commercialisation fund would secure Australia’s ability to respond to the crisis after COVID.“The pandemic has put into stark relief the fact that science investments made over previous decades have come into their own in this moment of national need,” she said.“With the crucial role of science front and centre in the public mind, it’s time to secure the science capabilities we need to face the crisis after COVID – and the ones after that.”“A Science Future Fund or Research Translation & Commercialisation Fund would help turbo-charge Australia’s economic recovery and maximise our bang-for-buck return from university research.”“What’s missing from our research funding system at the moment is a vehicle to get more of our ‘almost there’ stage research turned into products and services that create new jobs and growth.”“Australia has a highly-skilled STEM workforce and world-class research – our challenge is to maximise even further the returns those assets deliver to the nation and economy.”STA estimates the proposal would cost $2.4 billion over the Budget forward estimates.“A new research translation and commercialisation fund would drive deeper collaboration between universities and business, create new local jobs, and boost sovereign capability,” she said.“As we come out of the pandemic, we have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to enable science and technology to boost our economy, secure Australia’s intellectual property rights, and prepare us for whatever crisis comes next. A research translation fund would do all of this and more.”Science & Technology Australia proposes the Government use the May 2021 Budget to make long-term reforms that create a powerful legacy. These include:Secure Australia’s capability to respond to future crises by establishing a new ‘Science Future Fund’ or ‘Research Translation Fund’ to turn more of Australia’s science into rapid applications;Tackle the urgent need to stop the brain drain of young people out of STEM and boost future STEM talent for Australia with a new strategic initiative to inspire more Australian school students into science, technology, engineering and maths;Tap into deep Indigenous knowledge in science, technology, engineering and maths by investing $4 million over four years to support an Australian Indigenous Scientists/STEM Network;Invest in a comprehensive long-term national plan for Australian science and technology;Continue the commitment to nurture expert STEM advice and connections for policymakers with a long-term endowment to support Science Meets Parliament; andAn initiative to track the loss of researchers and scientists from Australia’s university sector and a program to provide workforce bridging for those affected. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Australian, business, Engineering, Government, Indigenous, Investment, parliament, property, research, Science & Technology Australia, Scientists, stem, students, technology, university, workforcelast_img read more

Read More →

Social costs of pandemic will be felt for a decade

first_imgSocial costs of pandemic will be felt for a decade London School of Hygiene & Tropical MedicineNew analysis reveals gaps in public-policy making that must be addressed to tackle societal impactsSociety will continue to feel the impacts of COVID-19 for a decade or more without an urgent public policy overhaul, warns an independent research report.The report forecasts that significant intervention will be needed to avoid an acceleration towards poorer health, social and economic outcomes, and a more extreme pattern of inequality.It was published by the British Academy, with a ‘deep dive’ of evidence contributed by Dr Alex Mold, Professor Virginia Berridge and Dr Suzanne Taylor of the Centre for History in Public Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM). The team convened and engaged with over 200 academics, practitioners and policy specialists from across the humanities and social sciences, and drew together insights from civil society, communities and policymakers.The interconnected trends highlighted included lack of trust in the government, widening geographic inequalities, worsening social development and mental health and access to education at all levels.An accompanying policy analysis argues that these societal impacts have exposed several gaps in public policy-making that the Government now has the opportunity to address. The researchers suggest resolving tensions between local and central governance, strengthening and expanding community-led social infrastructure, improving the flow of knowledge and information between all levels of government, and empowering businesses and civic, educational and social institutions to act with a shared sense of social purpose.Virginia Berridge, Professor of History and Health Policy at LSHTM, said: “There can be no doubt that the COVID-19 pandemic will have a profound impact on society. This report, which drew on insights from the social sciences and humanities is especially valuable for it its incorporation of history. There is no way forward which does not build on the history of past health crises, how they were responded to, what changed, what did not, and why.”Professor Dominic Abrams FBA, Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Kent and lead author of the reports, said: “The evidence provides us with a vital insight into the immense social impact of COVID-19 and the substantial challenges we must address in the coming decade.“There are multiple forms of inequality that create personal and societal obstacles to progress. Finding ways to create greater inclusiveness, tackle underlying mechanisms of inequality, and create the resourcefulness to share a better future will be our biggest challenge during this ‘COVID decade’.“The COVID decade will also be profoundly shaped by policy decisions, and this offers us many opportunities. Government will need to establish a longer-term vision to tackle the impacts of COVID-19. This will involve working in partnership with places and people to address structural problems systematically, not just in a piecemeal way.”Hetan Shah, Chief Executive of the British Academy, said: “A year from the start of the first lockdown, we all want this to be over. However, in truth, we are at the beginning of a COVID decade. Policymakers must look beyond the immediate health crisis to repair the profound social damage wrought by the pandemic.“This means looking across education, employment, welfare, urban planning, community support and digital policies. It will require investing in civil society and our social infrastructure to strengthen our local communities, especially in our most deprived areas. We also need a more joined-up policy approach across government departments focusing on supporting children and young people whose lives have been so blighted by the pandemic. “Science has given us the vaccine to respond to the health crisis, but we will need social science and the humanities to meet the social, cultural and economic crises we face in the COVID decade.”PublicationEvidence review:The COVID Decade: understanding the long-term societal impacts of COVID-19. The British AcademyPolicy report:Shaping the COVID decade: addressing the long-term societal impacts of COVID-19. The British Academy /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:British, education, employment, Government, health, inequality, infrastructure, London, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, mental health, Professor, psychology, public health, social impact, university, urban planning, Virginialast_img read more

Read More →

Minister Bennett highlights investments that support Indigenous communities in Budget 2021

first_imgMinister Bennett highlights investments that support Indigenous communities in Budget 2021 From: Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs CanadaToday, the Honourable Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, met with representatives from 10 Self-Governing First Nations in BC to discuss investments that support Indigenous communities from Budget 2021: A Recovery Plan for Jobs, Growth, and Resilience.Today, the Honourable Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, met with representatives from 10 Self-Governing First Nations in BC (Huu-ay-aht First Nations, Ka:’yu:’k’t’h’/Che:k’tles7et’h’ First Nations, Toquaht Nation, Uchucklesaht Tribe and Yuułuʔiłʔath First Nations, Tsawwassen First Nation, Tla’amin Nation, Sechelt Indian Band, Westbank First Nation, and the Nisga’a Nation) to discuss investments that support Indigenous communities from Budget 2021: A Recovery Plan for Jobs, Growth, and Resilience.No relationship is more important to the federal government than the relationship with Indigenous peoples. The federal government continues to work with Indigenous peoples to build a nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown, government-to-government relationship-one based on respect, partnership, and the affirmation of rights.Through Budget 2021, the federal government is proposing an historic, new investment of over $18 billion over the next five years to improve the quality of life of and create new opportunities for people living in Indigenous communities. Working with Indigenous partners, these investments will make significant strides in closing gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples; supporting healthy, safe, and prosperous Indigenous communities; and advancing meaningful reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis Nation. These investments will support continued action on infrastructure and support for Indigenous entrepreneurs.The COVID-19 recession is the steepest and fastest economic contraction since the Great Depression. It has disproportionately affected low-wage workers, young people, women, and racialized Canadians. For businesses, it has been a two-speed recession, with some finding ways to prosper and grow, but with many businesses-especially small businesses-fighting to survive. Budget 2021 is an historic investment to address the specific wounds of the COVID-19 recession, put people first, create jobs, grow the middle class, set businesses on a track for long-term growth, and ensure that Canada’s future will be healthier, more equitable, greener, and more prosperous.Budget 2021 proposes distinctions-based investments of $6 billion over five years, starting in 2021-22, with $388.9 million ongoing, to support infrastructure in Indigenous communities. This includes $4.3 billion over four years into an Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund, a distinctions-based fund to support immediate demands prioritized by Indigenous partners. The Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund will work in tandem with infrastructure projects in First Nations, including modern-treaty and self-government First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Nation communities.Investing in the Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund will in turn support those on the path toward Indigenous self-determination and, in the process, build strong Indigenous communities. The government is accelerating work to close infrastructure gaps and provide the support necessary for Indigenous communities to thrive in the long-term.Canada entered the pandemic in a strong fiscal position. This allowed the government to take quick and decisive action to support people and businesses, and put it in the position to make historic investments in the recovery.Quotes“We gained access to Budget 2018 federal capital infrastructure gaps-closing support just in time as every house in the village of the Uchucklesaht people were deemed unlivable. With this funding we saw 6 new homes built and made it possible for 6 families to move back home in 2020, with 8 more under development in 2021. This is true Reconciliation on the ground making homes for people to be able to practice long forgotten cultural practices. Without this funding this would not have happened and we look forward to further Budget 2021 investments as they unfold.”Chief Charlie Cootes, Uchucklesaht Tribe Government“We appreciate the sustained interest of the Ministers and our Federal Colleagues to prioritize and fund the housing and infrastructure needs of its treaty and self-government partners. Nisga’a Lisims Government and other self-governing Indigenous governments have demonstrated their expenditure need in both of these areas. The fiscal relationship is fundamental to the success of treaties and self-government. Budget 2021 is an opportunity for Canada to work with its treaty and self-government partners to build back better while at the same time growing rural economies through investments in housing and infrastructure. The Nisga’a Nation is ready to build and to work with its treaty partner to achieve change in these unprecedented times. We welcome further dialogue with the Minister and her colleagues on how to do so.”Eva Clayton, President of Nisg̱a’a Lisims Government“COVID-19 has had a profound socio-economic impact on Indigenous communities in Canada. Continued action is necessary to counteract this current recession. I appreciated hearing from self-governing First Nations in British Columbia today to hear their advice about the best ways to support Indigenous infrastructure and how to support new opportunities for economic growth that will strengthen communities and improves quality of life of all community members. Together, we will continue to walk the path of reconciliation, recover from Covid-19 and rebuild our nation-to-nation relationship.”The Honourable Carolyn Bennett, M.D., P.C., M.P.Minister of Crown-Indigenous RelationsQuick factsThe COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on Indigenous communities and businesses. Public health measures have affected many of the revenue sources communities use to support service delivery and pay loans that have been taken out to support community, economic development, and jobs.To ensure the long-term resilience of Indigenous economies, Budget 2021 proposes to provide $117 million to renew the Indigenous Community Business Fund and $33.4 million to support the First Nations Finance Authority’s pooled borrowing regime.The Aboriginal Entrepreneurship Program helps Indigenous entrepreneurs access affordable loans to start and grow their businesses. Budget 2021 proposes to invest $42 million over three years, starting in 2021-22, to expand the Aboriginal Entrepreneurship Program. This will directly support Indigenous-led businesses and help Indigenous communities generate wealth by improving access to capital and business opportunities.Currently, only 36 per cent of Indigenous-led businesses are owned by women. Budget 2021 proposes to invest $22 million over three years, starting in 2021-22, to support the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association’s Indigenous Women’s Entrepreneurship Initiative. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Aboriginal, British, Canada, Economic Development, entrepreneurs, Federal, federal government, Government, India, Indigenous, infrastructure, Investment, public health, resilience, Small Business, womenlast_img read more

Read More →