The pv magazine weekly news digest

first_imgThe pv magazine weekly news digestThis week it was all Tesla, Tesla, Tesla and, in other news: Tesla. Apparently Elon Musk has released some new product or other… May 8, 2015 Max Hall Finance Installations Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share For solar and renewables supporters crying into their cornflakes over Britain’s shock decision to elect a Conservative government and perhaps turn its back on renewables in favour of gas and nuclear, there was at least some good news that emerged this week. In the U.S., it seems, utilities are fast turning to solar as the cheapest option for new generation – even ahead of natural gas, and who ever thought Britain would be turning to the States for a lesson in how to be more left of center? With solar PPAs in some states coming in lower than gas competitors, America’s largest ten utilities installed 72 per cent of the 5.3 GW of new solar capacity added last year. And the power companies are getting in on community and residential solar too with four utilities introducing rooftop solar programs in 2014 and 77 of the 93 community schemes operating in the U.S. last year managed by utilities. Not surprisingly it was Californian utilities that led the pack with Pacific Gas & Electric topping the pile with 1.68 GW of capacity added, ahead of Southern Californian Edison, with 1.04 GW. The big question now is how big the fall-off will be when the federal investment tax credit for solar ends in two years’ time but, at a time when we are sorely in need of lifting, let’s not give ourselves more things to be glum about just yet. And after all, you’re my Powerwall Whatever you think of Elon Musk and Tesla’s solar-powered products, there is no denying its ability to hog the headlines and that was as true among loyal pv mag readers as elsewhere. Four of the six most-read stories on our website this week had the word Tesla somewhere in them and solar companies were falling over themselves with almost indecent haste to buddy up with the new Powerwall residential solar storage system. U.S. inverter maker Fronius will offer the Powerwall bundled with its Symo Hybrid product to customers in Germany before rolling the offer out across Europe and Australia and is so keen to jump on the Tesla bandwagon it will offer the Powerwall as an alternative to its own-brand solar battery. Residential solar company Sunrun was quick to follow suit, indicating the Powerwall will be offered as part of its solar system package and confirmation the new battery system will also be available to SolarCity customers – which, according to the installer’s publicity basically encompasses every human being in the U.S. – completed a good week for Mr Musk. Expect Powerwall toys to be offered as part of Happy Meals any day now. Lux analysts have a grumble Such was the stampede for all things Powerwall this week, the discordant note issued by analysts Lux Research sounded rather curmudgeonly. Lux says providing bargain basement priced cells from its much-vaunted ‘gigafactory’ is only half the battle for Tesla because installation, inverter and other balance of system (BoS) costs will double the headline upfront $3,500 cost of a shiny new Powerwall. Tesla will need to get a sufficient number of suppliers of such products and services on board to reduce that bill and/or offer attractive funding options for would-be customers. They will also have to get the utilities onside, added Lux analysts… who clearly have not been logging on to pv-magazine.com this week. Can we have Powerwalls too? Please? As if to emphasize the point, news started to come in of more Tesla Powerwall partners around the globe with German company Lichtblick and Australian counterparts Reposit Power tying up their FIT maximizing technology solutions with the home storage equivalent of the hula hoop. Then it was Israel’s turn, with inverter company SolarEdge indicating its products will be sold together with the ubiquitous Powerwall and Tesla is even making advances into the commercial scale market with a 1 MW version of the Powerwall – the Marvel superhero-esque named Powerpack – installed at a beef processing plant in Fresno whose CEO somewhat incongruously took the opportunity to emphasize his company’s ‘eco-credentials’. Energy experts too were caught up in the frenzy, predicting Musk would bring to an end the use of fossil fuels, nuclear power and Britain’s Conservative government – and I’m only making up one of those predictions. Actually, it’s not that cheap… But not everyone was persuaded, with representatives of Germany’s storage sector pointing out the headline $3,500 price is the cost of a Powerwall to installers rather than the retail price and also that Tesla has not released information about the usable battery capacity offered – necessary for a true evaluation of the product. It has also been pointed out that Tesla has said the Powerwall will incorporate the same batteries used in its electric vehicles (EVs). Tesla car batteries have a life of less than 500 cycles – enough for around 200,000km on the road but, as pv magazine‘s Michael Fuhs pointed out, the same battery in a stationary household system would need at least 4,000 cycles for a 20-year lifespan. Andreas Piepenbrink, boss of German storage solution company E3DC – one of Tesla’s competitors, it must be said – said it will be interesting to see if Musk’s product can compete with established brands such as Panasonic and Samsung. Clearly his firm wasn’t invited to the Tesla party. Egypt forges ahead Amid all the Powerwall media frenzy, there was also more good news from Egypt which, despite political paralysis in the country, is managing to live up to its billing as a major new emerging market – in terms of signatures on documents at least. The Middle East Solar Industry Association (MESIA) trade mission to Cairo saw the Egyptian government headed by Abdel Fattah el-Sisi sign memoranda of understanding for another 220 MW of solar after similar deals with Canadian and Jordanian companies in March. In the latest deals, Egyptian developers Orascom Construction and Sun Infinite will each develop 50 MW projects, along with Emirati company Access Group and Saudi developer Alfanar, and Gila Al Tawakol, another domestic company will round out the figure with a 20 MW project. Egypt wants to add 2.3 GW of solar by 2017 and is roaring ahead with its solar plans despite the political risk in a nation riven by deep divisions after el-Sisi toppled Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, the first democratically elected leader in the nation’s long and proud history. And the British think their electorate is polarized…Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… 123456Share pv magazine The pv magazine editorial team includes specialists in equipment supply, manufacturing, policy, markets, balance of systems, and EPC.More articles from pv magazine Related content Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.… Germany installed 548.6 MW of PV in March Sandra Enkhardt 30 April 2021 pv-magazine.com In the first three months of 2021, newly installed solar capacity reached 1.42 GW.April 30, 2021 Sandra EnkhardtMarket… California to host 1 GW of compressed air storage Tim Sylvia 30 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Two projects in California will fill part of the 1,600 MW of long-duration energy storage that state regulators have said is needed by 2026. 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Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… iAbout these recommendations Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. 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Select one or more editions for targeted, up to date information delivered straight to your inbox.Email* Select Edition(s)*Hold Ctrl or Cmd to select multiple editions.Tap to select multiple editions.Global (English, daily)Germany (German, daily)U.S. (English, daily)Australia (English, daily)China (Chinese, weekly)India (English, daily)Latin America (Spanish, daily)Brazil (Portuguese, weekly)Mexico (Spanish, daily)Spain (Spanish, daily)France (French, daily)We send newsletters with the approximate frequency outlined for each edition above, with occasional additional notifications about events and webinars. We measure how often our emails are opened, and which links our readers click. To provide a secure and reliable service, we send our email with MailChimp, which means we store email addresses and analytical data on their servers. You can opt out of our newsletters at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of every mail. For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Household solutions for maximizing self-consumption using smart contro… , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRobert van Keulen, Technical Manager, GrowattGautham Ram, Assistant Professor and Researcher, D… Reducing solar project risk for extreme weather 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsDaniel H.S. Chang, VP of Business Development | RETCGreg Beardsworth, Sr. Director of Product M… iAbout these recommendations pv magazine print Curtailing corrosion: making mounting structures last pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Raw material quality is vital for solar power plants, particularly given higher expectations for their lifetimes, as 30+… Strong growth ahead for storage pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Annual battery storage installations will exceed 10 GW/28 GWh in 2021, following a particularly strong year in 2020, des… Australia’s next wave of large-scale solar development pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Call it “latent energy” – Australia’s renewable resources are expected to help some of the world’s greatest polluters to… Battery testing builds certainty pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Owners and operators of energy storage systems, as well as investors, need transparent ways to evaluate battery performance. The ideal format pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The speed at which manufacturers are introducing changes from one product generation to the next is accelerating – curre… ESG criteria: Should developers take notice? Michael Fuhs 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Something is brewing in the financial world. “Sustainable finance” and the growth of ESG funds have been taking the mark… iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

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Passenger slashes mother in face with knife after child throws up on bus

first_imgNew York City Police Department(NEW YORK) — A mother has been slashed in the face with a knife after her child threw up on a public bus and another passenger became so enraged that she allegedly followed the mother and attacked her.The incident occurred on Tuesday at about 6:20 p.m. in Brooklyn, New York, when authorities say a mother was on a bus when one of her children got sick and vomited, resulting in the bus being immediately put out of service so it could be cleaned and disinfected, according to ABC News’ New York City station WABC-TV.The 31-year-old mother took her kids off the bus and was shortly after approached by another female passenger who was enraged that the bus had to be taken out of service due to the woman’s child being sick.Authorities say the passenger then pulled out a knife and slashed the woman across the face on the corner of Elton Street and Sutter Avenue in Brooklyn before she fled eastbound on Sutter Avenue in a black Toyota Camry.The young mother was taken to hospital and treated for a laceration to her face. Her condition is currently unknown.The New York Police Department is offering a $2,500 reward for information leading to the arrest and indictment of the suspect. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Anastasia’s Christy Altomare & Derek Klena Win Our Hearts in New Recording-Studio Video

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on March 31, 2019 Related Shows Derek Klena Christy Altomare View Comments Star Files Derek Klena & Christy Altomare(Photo: Polk & Co.) Anastasia first appeared on Broadway in March to the delight of theatergoers. The story that follows a brave young woman who sets out to discover the mystery of her past made a beautiful and seamless transition from the screen to the stage. The show has just released a new recording-studio video, featuring the musical’s dazzling stars, former Broadway.com vlogger Christy Altomare and Derek Klena singing Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty’s moving number “In a Crowd of Thousands,” and now we’re even more over the moon for the show. Watch the talented pair below and make your way to the Broadhurst Theatre soon to see their thrilling performances in person. Anastasialast_img read more

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Rudy’s Tenampa Taqueria coming to former Panzon’s space in Lenexa

first_imgRudy’s Tenampa Taqueria will open its second location in Lenexa in the space formerly occupied by Panzon’s. Photo credit Rudy’s Tenampa Taqueria.A taqueria that’s built up a loyal following at its original location on Westport Road in Kansas City, Mo., over the past 25 years will be opening an expansion location in Lenexa.From left, Rudy’s family members BJ Garcia, Regina Garcia, Rudy Garcia, Margie Garcia, Brandie Garcia & Anthony GarciaRudy’s Tenampa Taqueria said it expects to be open in the former Panzon’s space in the Country Hill Shopping Center at 87th Street and Lackman by mid-August. Panzon’s had been operating in the location for nearly three decades when it closed abruptly in March.Rudy Garcia, founder of Rudy’s Tenampa Taqueria, said the location’s history as a Mexican restaurant was among the factors that led to the decision to open his second location there. Rudy’s expects to bring back some of the employees who had been working at Panzon’s at the time it closed to work at the new Country Hill spot.“Our family and employees are excited to bring our traditions and authentic Mexican cuisine to Lenexa,” said Garcia, “We look forward supporting the city as well as the community as a whole for many years to come.”The original Rudy’s opened in September 1993, with a menu featuring recipes from Rudy’s mother Dora.last_img read more

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Velocity Retail Group’s December Transactions

first_imgVelocity Retail Group completed 11 transactions during the month of December totaling 300,000 SF. A summary of each:>> SKB Companies sold a 62,610 SF former Albertson’s grocery store for $1M at the SEC of Main and Dobson in Mesa to Ultimate Consignment. Michael Clark and John Jackson of Velocity Retail represented SKB in the transaction. The buyer was represented by Zak Kotter of LevRose Real Estate.>> Madison Development Group sold a 5,057 SF fully-lease Mattress Firm building to American Realty Capital. The building is in Bountiful, Utah. Madison recently purchased the land and constructed the building for the Tenant. The seller was represented by Darren Pitts of Velocity Retail and Chad Moore and Jeff Harrison of Mountain West Retail of Utah. The buyer was represented by Jonathan Moseley of 360 RE in Houston.>> Winco Advisors purchased two retail buildings in December both brokered by Andy Kroot of Velocity Retail. The first transaction, was a 14,691 SF shopping center at the SEC of Greenfield and McKellips Roads in Mesa. The center was built in 2008 and includes regional and national tenants such as Starbuck’s, Chase Bank, T-Mobile, NextCare, H & R Block, Jamba Juice and Café Mix. The 100% leased property was listed by Michael Hackett and Ryan Schubert of Cassidy Turley.In a second transaction, Andy Kroot represented Winco Advisors, which purchased a 5,000 SF, 100% leased commercial building in the Lake Air Mall shopping center in   Waco, Texas.>> Woodlands Village Shopping Center in Flagstaff, at 2600 Woodlands Village Blvd., sold to CCA Acquisitions Company. The 91,910 SF center, owned by PDC Community Centers was co-listed by Velocity Retail’s Darren Pitts and Ron Ault, and Mountain West Retail’s Ben Brown. Brown also represented the buyer in the $17.26M transaction which closed in December.>> Zeeks Pizza & Wings signed a 2,400 SF, 5-year lease at the SEC of Warner Rd. and 48th St. in Ahwatukee, which will open in the spring of 2013. The Landlord was represented by Velocity Retail Group’s Michael Clark and Nick Ault. The tenant was represented by Joel Gunning of West USA Realty.>> Raising Cane’s signed a 20-year, 3,552 SF build-to-suit deal at Gateway Crossing at the SWC of McDowell and 99th Avenue in Phoenix. The Landlord was represented by Michael Clark and John Jackson of Velocity Retail, and the tenant was represented by Mark Bramlett of Cassidy Turley BRE. The store is slated to open in the summer of 2013.>> Krispy Kreme signed a 5-year deal at Plaza del Sol shopping center at Indian School and 33rd Ave. in Phoenix. The 1,769 SF store will open in 2Q 2013 and is the fifth location for the franchise group in the Phoenix area. Andy Kroot represented the tenant, and Kimco is the Landlord.>> Wadsworth Development and Accelerated Development sold a fully-leased 12,000 SF building occupied by Mattress Firm. The building is at Hwy. 89 at the entrance to Flagstaff Mall to Aspen Properties. The NNN deal was listed by Darren Pitts and Ron Ault of Velocity Retail, the buyer was represented by Tom Knaub of Colliers International.>> Velocity Retail’s John Jackson and Michael Clark represented the landlord of the NEC of Greenway/Loop 303 in Surprise on a 14-year lease transaction with West Valley Dental Group has opened a 3,306 SF Peoria Family Dentistry office.>> Wadsworth Development and Accelerated Development purchased a 75,795 SF parcel at the SWC of Germann and Gilbert in Chandler. The parcel was sold by Exxon Mobil Foundation and is one of the last remaining parcels at the popular intersection. The buyer was represented by Dave Cheatham of Velocity Retail and the Seller was represented by Mindy Korth of CBRE. The buyers plan to build retail shops on the parcel in 2013.last_img read more

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Sleep suppresses brain rebalancing

first_imgThese findings raise the intriguing possibility that different forms of brain plasticity – for example those involved in memory consolidation and those involved in homeostatic rebalancing – must be temporally segregated from each other to prevent interference.The requirement that neurons carefully maintain an average firing rate, much like the thermostat in a house senses and maintains temperature, has long been suggested by computational work. Without homeostatic (“thermostat-like”) control of firing rates, models of neural networks cannot learn and drift into states of epilepsy-like saturation or complete quiescence.Much of the work in discovering and describing candidate mechanisms continues to be conducted at Brandeis. In 2013, the Turrigiano lab provided the first in vivo evidence for firing rate homeostasis in the mammalian brain. Lab members recorded the activity of individual neurons in the visual cortex of freely behaving rat pups for 8 hours per day across a nine-day period during which vision through one eye was occluded.The activity of neurons initially dropped, but over the next four days, firing rates came back to basal levels despite the visual occlusion. In essence, these experiments confirmed what had long been suspected – the activity of neurons in intact brains is indeed homeostatically governed.Due to the unique opportunity to study a fundamental mechanism of brain plasticity in an unrestrained animal, the lab has been probing the possibility of an intersection between an animal’s behavior and homeostatic plasticity. In order to truly evaluate possible circadian and behavioral influences on neuronal homeostasis, it was necessary to capture the entire 9-day experiment, rather than evaluate snapshots of each day.For this work, the Turrigiano Lab had to find creative computational solutions to recording many terabytes of data necessary to follow the activity of single neurons without interruption for more than 200 hours.Ultimately, these data revealed that the homeostatic regulation of neuronal activity in the cortex is gated by sleep and wake states. In a surprising and unpredicted twist, the homeostatic recovery of activity occurred almost exclusively during periods of activity and was inhibited during sleep. Prior predictions either assumed no role for behavioral state, or that sleeping would account for homeostasis.Finally, the lab established evidence for a causal role for active waking by artificially enhancing natural waking periods during the homeostatic rebound. When animals were kept awake, homeostatic plasticity was further enhanced.This finding opens doors onto a new field of understanding the behavioral, environmental, and circadian influences on homeostatic plasticity mechanisms in the brain. Some of the key questions that immediately beg to be answered include:What it is about sleep that precludes the expression of homeostatic plasticity?How is it possible that mechanisms requiring complex patterns of transcription, translation, trafficking, and modification can be modulated on the short timescales of behavioral state-transitions in rodents?And finally, how generalizable is this finding? As homeostasis is bidirectional, does a shift in the opposite direction similarly require wake or does the change in sign allow for new rules in expression? Share on Facebook Pinterest Share LinkedIncenter_img Share on Twitter Email Why humans and other animals sleep is one of the remaining deep mysteries of physiology. One prominent theory in neuroscience is that sleep is when the brain replays memories “offline” to better encode them (“memory consolidation”).A prominent and competing theory is that sleep is important for re-balancing activity in brain networks that have been perturbed during learning while awake. Such “rebalancing” of brain activity involves homeostatic plasticity mechanisms that were first discovered at Brandeis University, and have been thoroughly studied by a number of Brandeis labs including the lab of Brandeis professor of biology Gina Turrigiano.Now, a study from the lab just published in the journal Cell shows that these homeostatic mechanisms are indeed gated by sleep and wake, but in the opposite direction from that theorized previously: homeostatic brain rebalancing occurs exclusively when animals are awake, and is suppressed by sleep.last_img read more

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Study suggests posture — not revealing clothing — is what causes objectification at a basic cognitive level

first_imgEmail Pinterest Share on Twitter Share on Facebook New research suggests that the brain does not objectify people who are in revealing clothing if they’re not posed in a provocative way. The findings, which appear in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, indicates that objectification is mostly related to suggestive postures.“Sexualization is widely present in mass media with women (and to a lesser extent men) often depicted in sexualized ways. Objectification Theory (Fredrickson & Roberts, 1997) posits sexualization in the mass media is among the main vehicle of objectification of others: Sexualization might lead people to see others as if they were objects instead of people,” said study author Philippe Bernard of the Université libre de Bruxelles.“But what do we mean by seeing others akin to objects? Philosophers suggested that objectification occurs when a person is reduced to his/her body parts (e.g., Bartky, 1990). Moreover, research in cognitive psychology and neurosciences has documented that human stimuli such as faces and bodies are processed as wholes, as if the focus in on the forest (configural processing), whereas most objects are processed a set of features, as if the focus is on the trees (analytic processing).”center_img LinkedIn “My research directly tests whether sexualized individuals are likely to be visually processed in a way that resembles the way most objects are visually processed,” Bernard explained.“Moreover, sexualization is a multi-faceted concept that is not easy to define. I thus examined the role of two key sexualizing factors on objectification, namely skin-to-clothing ratio (the amount of skin that is visible in a given picture) and posture suggestiveness (whether a posture is sexually connoted or not).”In the study, participants viewed pictures of male and female bodies that varied in posture and skin-to-clothing ratios while the researchers recorded their electrical brain activity. The researchers were particularly interested in a pattern of electrical brain activity, known as the N170 response, that has been shown to be larger during the viewing of faces and bodies than during the observation of other objects.The brain responses indicated that bodies with less clothing and more suggestive postures were more arousing in general — especially for female bodies. But only bodies displaying suggestive postures were processed more akin to objects.“Our experiments showed that posture suggestiveness causes cognitive objectification, i.e., a diminished configural processing and increased analytic, piecemeal processing of bodies at a neural level. However, nudity does not prompt cognitive objectification: People do not objectify others on the basis of the amount of skin that is visible,” Bernard told PsyPost.“Overall, our findings thus show that posture suggestiveness is the key driver of cognitive objectification. This research indicates that images in mass media in which people are depicted in sexually suggestive postures are literally objectifying at a basic cognitive level.”The study — like all research — includes some limitations. For example, the bodies included in the study were all relatively young, white, and fit. It is also unclear why suggestive postures are associated with cognitive objectification, but it could be because such postures “render sexual body parts more visually salient” or because they are “used as an indicator of sexual agency and intentionality,” the authors of the study wrote.The study also has some practical implications. “Although suggestive postures and revealing clothing often go hand-in-hand, it may be possible to decouple these elements in the media and interpersonal interactions. For example, underwear and swimsuit advertisers could promote their products in ways that would reduce risk of objectification by presenting models in revealing clothing, but nonsuggestive posture,” the researchers wrote in their study.The study, “Revealing Clothing Does Not Make the Object: ERP Evidences That Cognitive Objectification is Driven by Posture Suggestiveness, Not by Revealing Clothing“, was authored by Philippe Bernard, Florence Hanoteau, Sarah Gervais, Lara Servais, Irene Bertolone, Paul Deltenre, and Cécile Colin. Sharelast_img read more

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Study reveals sharp increase in COVID-19 in kids in Shenzhen

first_imgCOVID-19 has become endemic to the Chinese city of Shenzhen, and a sharp increase in pediatric infections may indicate that community and intra-family transmissions have become the new mode of spreading the virus, according to a study published yesterday in Emerging Infectious Diseases.Also, in a research letter published yesterday in the Journal of Infection, researchers described and compared the wide range and changing characteristics of COVID-19 infection on computed tomographic (CT) imaging with clinical manifestations to improve diagnosis.Shifting characteristics in ShenzhenLed by researchers at the Third People’s Hospital in Shenzhen, the study analyzed clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of the city’s first 365 COVID-19 patients with laboratory-confirmed disease, including 74 clusters of 183 cases. The median patient age was 46 years (range, 1 to 86 years), and the cases were split evenly between males and females.To investigate the shift of the epidemic, the researchers compared patient characteristics before Jan 24 with those from Jan 25 to Feb 5. “Compared with before Jan 24, the proportion of case-patients without definite exposure was much higher from Jan 25 through Feb 5 (11% vs. 6%; P < 0.001) and increased to 36% (12/33) on both Jan 31 and Feb 5," the authors wrote.They also reported a sharp increase in the proportion of infected children (2% before Jan 24 to 13% for Jan 25 to Feb 5; P < 0.001), meaning that increased exposure for children and familial transmission could contribute substantially to the epidemic.The researchers noted that the steep increase could be attributed to the low proportion of children exposed early in the outbreak; early detection for children who had had close contact with people with diagnosed or suspected infection after control measures were implemented; or failure to identify the relatively mild signs and symptoms in children, especially because resources were limited early in the Wuhan outbreak.The investigators caution that delays from infection to illness onset or onset to confirmation may have biased the comparisons.After Jan 17, infections increased substantially and peaked Jan 22 to 30. The authors said that the decline since then is probably due to both under-identification of cases of recent onset and delayed identification or reporting.Interval from exposure to symptom onsetOf 56 clusters of single co-exposure cases, the mean interval of symptom onset between the primary and second case-patient in a cluster was 3.1 days. The mean interval of symptom onset between the primary and last case-patient within a cluster was 3.6 days.After strict control measures were implemented, the researchers observed a shortened span from illness onset to hospital visits (median days declined from 3 to 1; P < 0.001).Recommendations to contain spreadThe investigators recommend that infected patients be treated at designated hospitals to decrease the risk of nosocomial transmission. However, they found that only 13% to15% of infected patients went to the city's designated hospital first. "This finding means that a substantial number of case-patients visited >1 nondesignated hospital before they were admitted to the designated hospital, which increases the risk for nosocomial infection,” they wrote.”Early screening, diagnosis, isolation, and treatment are necessary to prevent further spread,” the researchers wrote. “Strengthening effective and efficient measures, including but not limited to personal protection within families and communities with a high risk for exposure, will prevent and interrupt community and intrafamily transmission.”Shenzhen is a city of 13 million people in southern China.Varied CT, clinical findingsIn the second study, researchers at Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China, detailed the CT findings and clinical characteristics of six women 27 to 63 years old with COVID-19.None of the patients had such underlying diseases as diabetes, cancer, or respiratory disease. Five had had Wuhan or Hubei exposures.They found that COVID-19’s wide variety of manifestations on CT can vary over time. Early in the disease, lesions can appear round and nodular in the central lung, unlike their common patchy appearance between the membrane surrounding the lung and the body wall. One patient had 3 follow-up scans 4 to 14 days later that showed diverse lesions and that the primary lesions had been absorbed and replaced elsewhere by new ones.On testing blood samples, the researchers observed normal or slightly decreased counts of leucocytes and lymphocytes and identified mildly decreased eosinophil counts in four of the patients. Four days later, follow-up testing revealed that the low eosinophil counts remained abnormal and had dropped even further. “The decrease of eosinophil count may be helpful for the early diagnosis of the disease,” they wrote, calling for further study of the phenomenon.They also commented on the high false-negative rate in the oropharyngeal swabs used to diagnose and confirm COVID-19 infection and called for an alternative technique to be developed as soon as possible.Serious symptoms unlikely in pregnancy, study findsIn other research news, pregnant women are not at increased risk of having severe symptoms of COVID-19 infection, according to an analysis of 147 women in Wuhan published Friday by the World Health Organization and China. The analysis found that only 8% of the women had serious illness, and 1% were critically ill.This is in contrast to other respiratory infections that easily infect pregnant women and can cause serious illness, with long-lasting consequences for them and their babies. While long-term effects on the babies are unknown, a small study published in February in The Lancet showed that the newborns of women infected with COVID-19 appeared healthy and virus-free after cesarean delivery and isolation from their mothers.last_img read more

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Charles Victor, Founder Of Treatment Products, Passes Away

first_imgDeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  Charles Victor, a long time member of SEMA and AAPEX, passed away from complications from a stroke on Oct. 7. Victor, who was 82 years old, was the founder of Treatment Products Ltd, a family business that manufactures “The Treatment” brand of car care products. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementVictor started Treatment Products in 1972 in the basement of his home in Chicago. A regular on many show car circuits in the 70s and 80s, the company grew to become a major manufacturer of customized waxes and polishes in the U.S. Victor worked closely for many years with his sons Kenneth and Jeff, who were raised in the automotive industry and who have been growing the company steadily since Charles’ retirement in 2000.“Charlie” was well-respected in the automotive industry and loved by many; he had a friendly and caring quality that will be missed by many customers and vendors in the automotive industry, as well as numerous friends and relatives.Victor is survived by his sons Kenneth, Jeff (Andrea) and his grandsons, Frank and Jake.Donations in Victor’s honor can be made to The Scleroderma Foundation at scleroderma.org.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

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Principle Power Abandons WindFloat Project in Oregon

first_imgPrinciple Power has withdrawn its lease request for a site approximately 25 kilometres west of Oregon’s Port of Coos Bay, where the company had planned to set up its WindFloat Pacific Demonstration Project.The project was proposed by Principle Power in May 2013 and the US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) gave its approval in early 2014.The WindFloat Pacific would have consisted of five 6MW wind turbines mounted on floating foundations, anchored to the seabed.BOEM said it is now no longer processing the project application and added that there is now only one offshore renewable energy project in Federal waters offshore Oregon, the Pacific Marine Energy Center South Energy Test Site (PMEC-SETS) wave energy project, proposed by the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC-OSU) at Oregon State University in June 2013.In 2013, Principle Power was awarded a Department of Energy grant to support its WindFloat project and the company announced the list of official project partners, which included: MacArtney Underwater Technology, Siemens Wind Power, Houston Offshore Engineering the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, RPS Evan Hamilton, Forristal Ocean Engineering, the American Bureau of Shipping and Det Norske Veritas.In 2012, Principle Power, together with Energias de Portugal (EDP) deployed a full-scale 2MW WindFloat system off the coast of Agucadoura, Portugal, which was the first offshore wind deployment worldwide that did not require the use of any heavy lift equipment offshore.last_img read more

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