Episode 4: A shoppers guide to the genome sequencing market

first_img About the Authors Reprints Molly Ferguson for STAT By Meg Tirrell and Luke Timmerman Dec. 17, 2015 Reprints Meg Tirrell It’s the holidays! Looking for a gift that really shows you care? How about getting your loved one’s genome sequenced?It took 15 years and $3 billion to sequence the first human genome. But in the decade since then, that cost has come down dramatically. For a few years DNA sequencing was progressing faster than Moore’s law. Today you can get some genetic information for as little as $199.But the promise of genome sequencing has yet to be fulfilled. While companies like 23andme offer an affordable look at your genetic traits, a full genome scan will still run you a couple thousand dollars. And the FDA is still struggling with figuring out how to regulate these consumer genetic tests. But while the public appetite for these services may be small, companies like Illumina and Arivale are placing a bet on the wider applications of genome sequencing.advertisement Music:Rollin at 5 – 210 – full, by Kevin MacLeod Co-host “The Readout LOUD,” CNBC senior health and science reporter @megtirrell Tags geneticsgenome sequencing Signal PodcastEpisode 4: A shoppers guide to the genome sequencing market Is genome sequencing right for you? No matter what you spend on your personal genome, whether it’s $199 or $25,000, you’re still going to get back results you may not exactly be able to use in everyday life. But if your New Year’s resolution is to “know thyself” better, then this episode of Signal is for you.Subscribe to Signal on iTunes or Stitcher.The Signal podcast is produced by Katie Hiler.advertisementlast_img read more

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The dream of 3-D-printed organs rests on keeping cells alive. A new advance could help

first_img“They’re showing very elegantly in this work that we don’t need to over-engineer the system,” said Jordan Miller, a bioengineer at Rice University who was not involved in the study. The researchers got “functional tissue to emerge out of this provisional tissue they fabricated and implanted, which is just tremendously exciting.”The Wake Forest team’s 3-D printer at work fabricating a jaw bone structure. Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative MedicineThe Wake Forest team is one of many in mostly academic labs around the globe using molds to create a vascular system for 3-D-printed tissue.Other researchers have demonstrated vascularization techniques like seeding channels with the cells that line the inside of blood vessels, or connecting implants directly in line with a rat’s artery. Atala and his Wake Forest colleagues tried a different tack: relying on the host animal’s healing systems to naturally fill the empty channels with blood vessels.Figuring out how to pattern the rivers of microchannels is key to getting blood to flow properly between the layers of 3-D-printed cells because, without a blood supply, the dense layers of tissue found in complex organs won’t survive in any configuration that’s larger than about the thickness of a sheet of paper. That’s been “the basic limitation of this field forever up to this point,” Atala said.By contrast, 3-D printing is increasingly being used in the clinic for things like customized knee and jaw replacements using plastics and titanium. Those medical and dental applications represented a more than $500 million global market in 2014, according to Wohlers Associates, a Colorado-based consulting firm focused on 3-D-printing.But actually making something with living cells is a lot more challenging — and that’s slowed commercial development in the field significantly.“Getting investors on board for a long-term experimental study that may not pan out … is a difficult proposition for venture capitalists right now,” Miller said.Still, a few companies are still trying.A Texas startup called TeVido BioDevices is looking to 3-D-print skin and fat cells to create nipple grafts for breast cancer survivors undergoing reconstructive surgery. That’s much simpler than trying to print something like muscle, and it’s allowed them to produce tissue at larger sizes than if they’d needed blood channels to keep cells alive.But funding has been tough. Since its founding in 2011, the company has received only about $1.25 million, mostly from the US government’s Small Business Innovation Research program.“That’s one of the things that’s limiting our progress, obviously,” said Scott Collins, the company’s president. But he’s optimistic about TeVido’s bet on simpler tissues until the technical capabilities for more complex tissues catches up.Organovo, the world’s first publicly traded 3-D bioprinting company, is working with scientists at Yale University to solve some of these technical challenges to bioprinting human organs. But in the meantime, the San Diego firm is focused on selling 3-D-printed tissues for screening the toxicity of experimental drugs in the lab. “We’re trying to displace animal models,” said CEO Keith Murphy.The company started by offering human liver tissue for drug testing in late 2014. Kidney models will be rolled out later this year. Organs suitable for surgical transplantation will take a decade or more.The Wake Forest group’s next step is to do more testing in animals to assess whether their 3-D-printed tissue can survive and stay safe long-term. But Atala said it’s too early to talk about commercializing his team’s advance.Companies “are just treading the water right now in terms of looking at these systems and seeing how well they work,” he said.Elie Dolgin contributed reporting. In the LabThe dream of 3-D-printed organs rests on keeping cells alive. A new advance could help There’s plenty of excitement around the promise of machines that can spit out living cells patterned to create three-dimensional biological structures.But the dream of functional 3-D-printed tissue and organs has long been stymied by a stubborn central challenge: how to get blood to flow to keep the cells alive.Now, a team of researchers at the Wake Forest School of Medicine in North Carolina has made the latest contribution to solving the puzzle, though their findings are still a long way away from helping patients.advertisement By Rebecca Robbins Feb. 15, 2016 Reprints Tags medical devicesmedical technologyorgan transplant This 3-D-printed human cartilage possessed all the natural characteristics of an ear when implanted in a rodent model. Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine The researchers devised a printing method that allowed them to fabricate bone, muscle, and cartilage tissues threaded with tiny channels where blood vessels developed when implanted in mice and rats. Most strikingly, this method worked with cartilage tissue the size and shape of a human baby’s ear, a structure much larger than would have been possible to sustain without blood flow.“You’re basically creating a vascular network with a printer,” said Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine. He and his colleagues reported the findings Monday in Nature Biotechnology.advertisementlast_img read more

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The ‘Charlie Sheen effect’ boosted AIDS awareness, study says

first_img Related: Given historic trends, there were almost 3 million more searches about HIV on Nov. 17 than expected, and more than 1 million were related to important public health messages because they included search terms for condoms, HIV symptoms, or HIV testing. The study doesn’t list the total number of HIV-related searches that day on Google. About the Author Reprints “While no one should be forced to reveal HIV status, Sheen’s disclosure may benefit public health by helping many people learn more about HIV infection and prevention,” the researchers wrote in a report published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine.They analyzed Google trends data along with news trends from a Bloomberg LP terminal system from 2004 through three weeks after Sheen’s announcement.advertisement Watch: Charlie Sheen’s doctor wants you to know he’s no Hollywood quack HealthThe ‘Charlie Sheen effect’ boosted AIDS awareness, study says — Lindsey Tanner Related: Actor Charlie Sheen was called a lot of things during his bad-boy days. Until now, public health promoter wasn’t one of them.Sheen’s revelation that he’s infected with the AIDS virus prompted the greatest number of HIV-related Google searches recorded in the United States since 2004, and more than 1 million of them involved public health-related information.That’s according to a new study from San Diego State University research professor John Ayers and colleagues, who examined the impact of the announcement Nov. 17 by the former star of TV’s “Two and a Half Men.”advertisement Andrew Burton/Getty Images Could safer porn promote safer sex? By Associated Press Feb. 22, 2016 Reprints The researchers also found there were more than 6,500 HIV-related news stories — not counting duplicates from the same news source — on Google News alone on Nov. 17, reversing a decade-long decline in news reporting about the virus.Sheen’s tumultuous professional and personal life has made news before — for public outbursts, drug and alcohol use, and prostitution. The study didn’t look at the online impact of those headlines.The researchers noted that former NBA star Magic Johnson sparked increased HIV awareness when he disclosed his own infection, in 1991, before the Internet was so ubiquitous. They said public health authorities could leverage the “Charlie Sheen effect” to keep the spotlight on HIV awareness, and that Sheen’s disclosure could potentially have a greater impact because of how connected people are to information.About 1 million people nationwide are HIV-infected but government estimates say about 150,000 of them don’t know it — emphasizing the importance of better awareness, Ayers said.A journal editorial says public health authorities face a challenge when blockbuster celebrity health news surfaces, and need to make sure useful health information is easily accessible to consumers at such moments. Associated Press Tags AIDSCharlie SheenHIVlast_img read more

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11 dead in suspected South Sudan cholera outbreak

first_img JUBA, South Sudan — UNICEF says 11 people have died in a suspected cholera outbreak in South Sudan.The organization said Tuesday there are 72 suspected cases so far, including 36 in the capital, Juba. Others are in Bor and Terekeka counties.South Sudan’s health ministry has not declared an outbreak because samples are undergoing final laboratory testing for confirmation, but a cholera response plan has been launched anyway, said ministry official Dr. Thomas Akim Ujjiga.advertisement Health11 dead in suspected South Sudan cholera outbreak About the Author Reprints One suspected case came from inside a United Nations base in Juba, raising fears that it could spread among the 4,000 people sheltering there from fighting this month between opposing army factions, said Ashley McLaughlin, spokeswoman for the International Organization for Migration, which manages the camp.advertisement The ministry issued an alert Sunday after suspected cases started arriving Friday at Juba Teaching Hospital. Tags cholerapublic health Everyone agrees we need to fight cholera. No one can agree on how center_img Related: Relatives of a 30-year-old man grieve after he died of cholera, outside the cholera isolation ward at the Juba Teaching Hospital in the South Sudan capital in May 2014. There is a new suspected cholera outbreak in the country. Matthew Abbott/AP By Associated Press July 19, 2016 Reprints Associated Press Relief groups need to stem the suspected outbreak “now, before it gets worse” considering the high number of displaced people in Juba during the current rainy season, McLaughlin said.South Sudan’s civil war displaced some 28,000 people in Juba after fighting began in late 2013, and renewed fighting last week caused more upheaval, with 15,000 people taking shelter in UN, aid organization, church and other compounds.Last year, 47 people died in South Sudan in a cholera outbreak, and 167 died from the disease in 2014.Cholera is a gastrointestinal disease, usually spread by contaminated water and food, and can cause severe diarrhea that, in extreme cases, can lead to fatal dehydration and kidney failure within hours.— Jason Patinkinlast_img read more

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Breakthrough Prize honors 5 biomedical researchers with red carpet treatment

first_img Please enter a valid email address. By Rebecca Robbins Dec. 4, 2016 Reprints The Breakthrough Prize ceremony is elaborately choreographed and ultra glitzy. Steve Jennings/Getty Images Roeland Nusse: He co-discovered a gene and mapped out its role in producing the molecular messages that are key to embryonic development — and, when things go wrong, cancer. Companies are using his research to develop drugs for low bone density and colon cancer.Stephen Elledge: The Harvard biologist contributed key insights into how cells repair damaged DNA. The same work won Elledge one of last year’s Lasker Awards, one of the most prestigious honors in medical science.Harry Noller: A molecular biologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz, he did key work elucidating the structure of ribosomes, which convert RNA into proteins.Yoshinori Ohsumi: It’s been a good year for this Japanese biologist. Earlier this fall he won the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for the same work that the Breakthrough Prize honors: his discovery of the cell process known as autophagy, which allows cells to recycle proteins and other molecules instead of just disposing them.Dr. Huda Yahya Zoghbi: A rare diseases researcher at Baylor College of Medicine, she’s being honored for uncovering the genetic causes and biological mechanisms of two rare neurological diseases. The work may have applications for drugs for conditions like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. (Read more about her story here.)Held annually since 2013, the Breakthrough Prize puts scientists on the same red carpet as celebrities. (Hollywood stars in attendance generally have at least a tangential connection to the world of science, even if that’s just a starring role in a science-themed film.)advertisement Related: Here are this year’s five biomedical winners, each of whom receives $3 million along with a Oscar statuette-esque trophy fashioned in the shape of a coil resembling DNA: When the Stanford developmental biologist Roeland Nusse learned he had won a $3 million science prize, he realized he didn’t have anything to wear to the glitzy awards ceremony. So he opted to rent a tux.He could have bought one, of course, with his windfall. But what would be the point? “I don’t see myself wearing a tuxedo too often,” Nusse told STAT.Welcome to the culture clash that is the annual Breakthrough Prize ceremony, an elaborately choreographed fete that’s billed as the Oscars of science because it lavishes researchers with a Hollywood treatment that takes them way out of their element. This year’s ceremony — hosted by the actor Morgan Freeman and featuring an actual red carpet and a performance from Alicia Keys — was held on Sunday night at a NASA hangar in Silicon Valley.advertisement The idea, as conceived by the billionaire venture capitalist Yuri Milner, was to elevate scientists to the level of celebrities and actors in the eye of the public. Asked how well he’s achieved that goal, Milner said, basically, it’s all relative.“Compared to some other prizes, we’re doing very well. Compared to the Super Bowl, we have a long way to go,” he told STAT in a phone interview.This year’s Breakthrough Prize ceremony also honored six physicists, a mathematician, and teenagers who created science videos. All told, the program doled out $25 million in prize money. Milner and his wife fund it, along with Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Dr. Priscilla Chan, Google cofounder Sergey Brin, and 23andMe CEO Anne Wojcicki.Milner wouldn’t disclose the budget for the ceremony itself.Past Breakthrough Prize winners interviewed by STAT described the surreal experience of listening to the roar of celebrities’ jets touching down for the ceremony — and conversations with Hollywood types that ranged from starstruck to scientifically literate.This year’s winners will spend Monday doing something more in their comfort zone: participating in a full day of talks and panel discussions on topics like gravitational wave astronomy and the gene-editing technology CRISPR-Cas9.No Hollywood celebrities are on that agenda.center_img Leave this field empty if you’re human: Newsletters Sign up for Weekend Reads Our top picks for great reads, delivered to your inbox each weekend. In the LabBreakthrough Prize honors 5 biomedical researchers with red carpet treatment Privacy Policy ‘The world will suffer’: Prize-winning researcher worries about limits on immigrants like her Tags cancerneurologyresearchlast_img read more

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Pharma trade group vows to review membership criteria, but is this an empty promise?

first_img @Pharmalot Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. The pharmaceutical industry trade group hopes to convince you that it is not all bark and no bite.In response to the outcry over Marathon Pharmaceuticals, which plans to sell a decades-old drug for $89,000 and also maintain a monopoly, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America slammed the company for “actions [that] are not consistent with the mission of our organization.” And the group promised a “comprehensive review” of its membership criteria. Stephen J. Ubl, CEO of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, which has rebuked Marathon Pharmaceuticals. CQ Roll Call/AP STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. GET STARTED Log In | Learn More Pharma trade group vows to review membership criteria, but is this an empty promise? What’s included? The Pharmalot View center_img What is it? Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprints [email protected] By Ed Silverman Feb. 16, 2017 Reprints Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Ed Silverman Tags drug pricingpharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

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Babies’ brain signals offer window into treating their pain

first_img Babies cry. They cry when they’re hungry, when they’re tired, when they need a diaper change — and when they’re in pain. For doctors, this is a problem. Could a baby’s cry mean an anesthetic isn’t working well during a procedure? That a painkiller for postoperative pain has worn off? Or could it mean something else entirely?Scientists at the University of Oxford think they have found a new way around that problem. Neuroscientist Caroline Hartley and her colleagues studied 72 infants undergoing medically necessary painful procedures, like a needle prick for a blood test. They found, using electrodes on the babies’ scalps, a signature change in brain activity about a half-second after a painful stimulus. In the future, that measure could help pain researchers objectively establish if an infant is in pain and, ultimately, determine how to manage it. The study was published in Science Translational Medicine on Wednesday.Other indicators are currently used to gauge an infant’s pain, like heart rate, oxygen saturation levels, and facial expression. Doctors should still use these indicators when they examine individual patients, Hartley noted, because they’re easy to assess in a clinical setting. But an EEG signature could be more specific than those and less likely to be triggered by other stressful, non-painful events.advertisement Giving newborns medicine is a dangerous guessing game. Can we make it safer? PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images Tags neurosciencepainpediatricsresearch That test was revised in 2014 by Bonnie Stevens, a professor at the University of Toronto and a senior scientists at the Hospital for Sick Children. Stevens, who was not involved in the EEG research, said the research was “exciting.”“I think it’s really moving the science of pain assessment in babies forward,” Stevens said. However, she added, “I don’t think looking at EEG responses is going to replace everything else.”Stevens agreed with the authors of the paper that an EEG is a specialized measurement best suited for research. (Determining medication dosages for infants is an area that needs more research — not just for pain medication, but for many other kinds.) She also noted that the researchers validated their results with only a part of the revised PIPP test and could have observed the EEG signals for a longer window to match the time it takes to see a behavioral response. Hartley acknowledged the study had other limitations, too. The study included 12 babies who were born after 34 weeks but before a full 40-week gestational period — but babies born even earlier than 34 weeks have different brain activity patterns, so the test wouldn’t be usable for them. The accuracy of the test is not great on an individual level; it could only accurately detect an infant in pain 64 percent of the time and was able to identify an infant not in pain 65 percent of the time.“We think that further research is needed before you could use it [on an individual basis],” Hartley said. However, it does a better job of determining across a group of infants if a painkiller is working as it should. In one of the team’s experiments, 11 out of 12 infants had a decreased pain-related EEG signal after doctors applied a topical anesthetic to their feet.Ultimately, an EEG could be a new, potentially valuable tool for pain researchers, Stevens said.“At the end of the day, we are going to need a multi-modal pain assessment for babies that is going to include both behavioral and physiological [measures] as well as something like EEG, which will pull everything together to give us a comprehensive pain assessment in babies.” Kate Sheridan This new EEG assessment will be one of two ways Hartley and her colleagues measure pain in their trial, in addition to a test based on an infant’s behavior, the revised Premature Infant Pain Profile.advertisement [email protected] Related:center_img 6 surprising facts about sugar-laden, virus-fighting breast milk @sheridan_kate By Kate Sheridan May 3, 2017 Reprints In the LabBabies’ brain signals offer window into treating their pain General Assignment Reporter Kate covers biotech startups and the venture capital firms that back them. And the approach is about to get its first field test. Hartley and another one of her coauthors have started recruiting patients for what is expected to be a three-year clinical trial to test the efficacy of morphine in infants. Treating an infant in pain is not like treating a tiny adult: Infants’ skins and intestines absorb drugs differently, and they can have different levels of enzymes that break down drugs and the receptors to which drugs bind, too. Related: About the Author Reprintslast_img read more

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Meet the biotech company trying to shake up how the FDA thinks about cancer drugs

first_imgBiotech Meet the biotech company trying to shake up how the FDA thinks about cancer drugs What is it? About the Author Reprints Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Log In | Learn More @damiangarde Tags biotechnologycancerprecision medicineSTAT+ By Damian Garde June 3, 2017 Reprintscenter_img What’s included? Prostate cancer cells. NIH GET STARTED National Biotech Reporter Damian covers biotech, is a co-writer of The Readout newsletter, and a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. Connecticut biotech Loxo Oncology is hoping to upend decades of Food and Drug Administration dogma with its cancer drug, seeking what would be a pioneering approval to treat a wide array of tumors with one pill. And, judging from an early peek at Loxo’s clinical data, experts say the plan just might work.Loxo’s drug, larotrectinib, is designed to kill off tumors by attacking a protein called TRK, which becomes hyperactive in people with certain genetic mutations. But where most drugs are studied in one cancer type at a time, Loxo aims to market its therapy for any tumor that expresses the TRK protein, and it’s building up evidence to convince the FDA. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. [email protected] Damian Gardelast_img read more

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The pharmacist to Congress has something to say about that Alzheimer’s remark

first_img WASHINGTON — The pharmacist who prepares prescription drugs for Congress would like you to know that he does not know of any members with Alzheimer’s. And if he did, he wouldn’t tell you.“I am not aware of any member that actually has Alzheimer’s and would certainly not disclose any such information if I did know,” Mike Kim said, adding that “patient privacy is a very serious matter that I am committed to upholding.” The pharmacist to Congress has something to say about that Alzheimer’s remark [email protected] STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included? Politics Senior News Editor By Erin Mershon Oct. 11, 2017 Reprints GET STARTED Mike Kim, owner of Grubb’s Pharmacy on Capitol Hill. Eric Kruszewski for STATcenter_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. @eemershon Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Log In | Learn More What is it? Tags Congresspharmaceuticalspolicy Erin Mershon About the Author Reprintslast_img read more

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As CRISPR patent fight nears the endgame, where are settlement talks?

first_img By Sharon Begley May 2, 2018 Reprints About the Author Reprints CRISPR pioneers Jennifer Doudna (left) of UC Berkeley and Feng Zhang (right) of the Broad Institute and MIT appeared together with journalist Michael Specter at a New Yorker magazine event in 2015. Anna Webber/Getty Images for The New Yorker Log In | Learn More What is it? Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. Sharon Begley Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.center_img As CRISPR patent fight nears the endgame, where are settlement talks? What’s included? [email protected] Business Three years after the University of California and the Broad Institute began battling over key patents on CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing inventions, the fat lady is finally about to sing in this multimillion-dollar operatic battle.The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which heard oral arguments in the case on Monday, is expected to rule within 90 days on whether the Broad can keep its foundational CRISPR patents, as the patent office ruled last year. (IP experts think the chances of the Supreme Court accepting the case, if the losing party tries that route, are comparable to those of the Baltimore Orioles winning the 2018 World Series.) Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. @sxbegle Tags biotechnologyCRISPRgeneticslegalSTAT+last_img read more

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