2 killed, 3 injured Southern California pursuit collision

first_imgHomeBad Behavior2 killed, 3 injured Southern California pursuit collision Aug. 31, 2019 at 5:45 amBad BehaviorCrimeNews2 killed, 3 injured Southern California pursuit collisionAssociated Press2 years agocollisionkillingLa Verne Police Departmentlos angeles countypursuitsouthern california Two people were killed and three others were critically injured when a car being pursued by police crashed into another car in eastern Los Angeles County.The La Verne Police Department says officers attempted to stop an Acura Integra for traffic violations at 8:50 p.m. Thursday but it sped on.After a quarter-mile (0.4 kilometer) pursuit, the Integra collided with a Toyota Corolla near an intersection.Police say both drivers were pronounced dead at a local hospital.Two passengers from the Integra and one passenger from the Corolla were also hospitalized and remained in critical condition as of  Friday morning.The collision is being investigated by the California Highway Patrol’s major accident team.Associated PressTags :collisionkillingLa Verne Police Departmentlos angeles countypursuitsouthern californiashare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentComing to national park trails: electric bikesCrime Watch – Monday, September 02, 2019You Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall7 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson18 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter18 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor18 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press18 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press18 hours agolast_img read more

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Verizon, HERE team to drive 5G car tech

first_img Verizon shuffles executives AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore1 07 JAN 2020 Kavit Majithia Previous ArticleGlobalData Releases 2019 5G Competitive Landscape Assessment: Huawei Remains 5G RAN 5G LeaderNext ArticleSprint scraps Virgin Mobile brand ahead of sale Related Verizon announced a partnership with HERE Technologies to collaborate on the development of safety and navigational systems in connected cars, using the US operator’s 5G network and edge compute platform.In a statement, the companies said they will explore cutting edge applications of Verizon’s 5G Ultra Wideband network, coupled with HERE Technologies’ location, data technology and autonomous vehicle expertise.Initial work will focus on vehicle and pedestrian safety, including collision avoidance, and better location identification and navigation for taxi and delivery services.Future plans involve developing a wide range of enterprise, industrial and consumer-facing use cases in a number of areas including automotive, smart cities, transport and logistics.HERE Technologies, which was sold by Finnish vendor Nokia to a German car consortium in 2015, said it will provide Verizon with access to location data, SDKs and APIs from its existing platform.Edzard Overbeek, CEO of HERE Technologies, hailed the scale of Verizon’s 5G Ultra-Wideband network, which he said was designed to enable the higher bandwidth and lower latency “necessary for more precise positioning”.“Our partnership with Verizon not only allows us to tap into the innovation potential of 5G, but also highlights what is possible when this technology is location intelligence enabled: connected services that are designed to make our world safer, more efficient and environmentally sustainable,” he said. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back 5GHEREVerizon Amazon reels in MGM Kavit joined Mobile World Live in May 2015 as Content Editor. He started his journalism career at the Press Association before joining Euromoney’s graduate scheme in April 2010. Read More >> Read more Mobile Mix: Buzzing for Barcelona Home Verizon, HERE team to drive 5G car tech Tags Authorlast_img read more

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Chernobyl: City of ghosts

first_imgThe new containment dome covering the destroyed reactor at Chernobyl nuclear power station | Brendan Hoffman/AFP via Getty ImagesIn 2015, Ukraine introduced a series of laws designed to de-communize the country. Soviet street names were changed to Ukrainian ones. Statues of Lenin were torn down. But here nothing has changed. “Why has no one torn this Lenin down?” an Australian visitor asked. “Why would you bother?” replied Yevgeny.Further down the road is a memorial park. Rows of signs, each a simple white rectangle bearing a name bolted to a pole, stand like headstones in memory of the 97 villages that ceased to exist after the disaster. For many in those early days, the evacuation brought back traumatic memories. Buses arrived to take them away; no one told them what was happening or where they were going. For some, it was the Nazi occupation all over again.We head to the forests that cover 70 percent of the exclusion zone. With no one there to look after them, foliage slowly burst through buildings and roads to almost completely smother what was once a teeming urban center. As human life has declined in Chernobyl, however, animal life has increased. Bears, deer, lynx, wild boars all roam here. But they are not for hunting — each is little more than a vessel of irradiated meat.A children’s seesaw stands among abandoned apartment buildings in Pripyat | Sean Gallup/Getty ImagesIn the forest is what was once a kindergarten. On the approach, a doll with three limbs missing lies a few feet from a sign warning of radiation. The scene is Chernobyl in miniature: human existence almost instantly snuffed out by the most potent force humanity has ever unleashed.Inside is a vista of decay — seemingly ancient but alarmingly timeless, like some latter day Pompeii. Only the rotting floorboards, thick layers of dust and rusting metal have changed. In the kindergarten’s dormitory, there are rows of bunk beds. Some still have toys on them. Children’s drawings are taped to the walls. On the floor lie several tiny shoes.* * * PRIPYAT, Ukraine — In a post-Cold War world, the fear of nuclear holocaust has receded from the global consciousness. Donald Trump’s threat of unleashing “fire and fury like the world has never seen” against North Korea was an untimely and unwelcome reminder of a past, perilous era. Even by Trump’s standards these statements were a new low. And they are dangerous. History teaches us that the journey from political logorrhea to global disaster can be terrifyingly short.As demagogues toss around nuclear threats like confetti at a wedding, it is easy to forget the devastation nuclear power can cause. But in one country, on Europe’s edge, they have not forgotten. And where once life thrived, there now stands a vast mausoleum.The city of Chernobyl lies about 90 kilometers from Ukraine’s capital, Kiev. It’s an ancient site — originally part of the land of Kievan Rus, the federation of Slavic tribes from whom modern Russians, Belarusians and Ukrainians all claim descent. In modern times the city was chosen as the site of the first nuclear power plant in Ukraine (then part of the USSR). Inside, the area is divided into two buffer zones, the first of which covers 30 square kilometers. The second, inner sector is 10 square kilometers and stretches around reactor number 4.Chernobyl once had a population of 14,000; now it’s just 688 mostly older people who returned after the clean-up. The remaining reactors continued to operate for years after the disaster, the last closing in 2000. Workers are still allowed inside reactor 4 but their time inside is limited to protect them from radiation.“Don’t drink water from the river,” our guide, Yevgeny, instructs us — somewhat needlessly. My Geiger counter (a device that measures radiation) reads 0.12 microsieverts. On average, a person safely absorbs about 3.65 millisieverts (there are 1,000 microsieverts to a millisievert) merely by living in a brick or concrete building.We get into a van to drive to Chernobyl. After passing through the village of Zalisya (now almost entirely covered in thick shrubbery) we arrive — and go immediately back in time. The sign at the city’s outskirts reads simply: “Chernobyl.” Written vertically, it is accompanied by the USSR’s hammer and sickle. The Geiger counter now reads 0.22 microsieverts. Reactor 4 is a mere 18 kilometers away.We drive down the city’s main road — Soviet Street — and pull up at a square. Yevgeny says we need to park carefully. The traffic police here are so bored they hand out tickets just for something to do.The square is immaculate. There is not a single piece of litter on the ground. The silence is near total; the streets seemingly scrubbed clean of all humanity. The odd vehicle drives past. At one corner of the square is a statue of Vladimir Lenin, his left hand clutching his lapel, his right thrust into his pocket. A sign warns of radiation contamination near former apartment buildings in Pripyat | Sean Gallup/Getty ImagesThe plant had four nuclear reactors and on April 26, 1986, reactor number 4 blew up during a test. The Soviets were initially reluctant to make the disaster public, but had no choice when nuclear reactors a thousand miles away in eastern Sweden began recording radiation levels 10 times higher than normal. Fire from the explosion had sent plumes of highly radioactive fallout across the USSR and Europe.Eventually, almost half a million people would come to be involved in the clean-up operation, which would last for months and cost an estimated 18 billion rubles (back when a ruble was equal to a U.S. dollar), playing its part in the eventual bankruptcy of the Soviet Union.People attend a commemoration on April 26, 2016, of the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear accident | Brendan Hoffman/Getty ImagesChernobyl was the most disastrous nuclear power plant accident in history. It wiped out two cities and even now the full extent of the casualties isn’t known. Most of the first responders died: two that night, with many more over the subsequent weeks and months. Their efforts, however, were arguably the most invaluable in modern history: they succeeded in preventing a second explosion that could have destroyed half of Europe. They died so that we might live.* * *Near Chernobyl is the city of Pripyat. Founded in 1970, it was the ninth Soviet nuclear city — built to accommodate the workers at the Chernobyl plant and their families. At the time of the disaster, Pripyat had a population of just under 50,000. Now both towns are surrounded by an exclusion zone that spans 2,600 square kilometers, put in place to prevent anyone from wandering into the contaminated area. Official permits are required to enter the zone.Anna Zayika for POLITICOAt the edge of the zone is a checkpoint manned by five armed guards. Two orange and white barriers, of the type used in car parks, block the road. Anyone wishing to enter must have their bags searched and identification checked, to be ticked off against a list of those granted permission to proceed. The giant stainless steel sarcophagus that covers reactor 4 gleams in the dappled sunlight. We are now in the inner buffer sector, just 100 meters from where it all began. The sarcophagus was built to cover an older one, built from concrete, and was installed late last year. It weighs 37,000 tonnes and the Statue of Liberty could comfortably fit inside. It’s the largest movable building in the world.Anna Zayika for POLITICONext to the reactor stands an old building. Its external fire escapes seem connected to it by rust alone and the steps are surrounded by splashes of reddish brown that have splayed out like a blood spatter. Nearby is an artificial lake that was used as a cooling system for the reactors. Now it is filled with fish grown far beyond their normal size. Normally, they would have been caught and eaten but that is simply not possible. “They are not fish,” says Yevgeny, “they are swimming pieces of radioactive waste.”As we depart, I take a final look at the forests that cover most of the area, and I finally understand that this is what nuclear holocaust looks like: it’s not the flat, arid wastelands of Mad Max, it’s the earth (eventually) bursting back into life, wresting back control from mankind’s stupidity.David Patrikarakos is a contributing writer at POLITICO. Also On POLITICO testimony Chernobyl poisoned my childhood By Zoya Sheftalovich Anatomy of a crisis: The North Korea threat By Jeremy C.F. Lin, Sarah Frostenson, Tyler Fisher and Jon McClurelast_img read more

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AAE acquires majority stake in ZSSK Cargo wagon fleet

first_imgSLOVAKIA: European wagon leasing company AAE has been selected to acquire a majority stake in the Cargo Wagon fleet management subsidiary of state-owned freight operator ZSSK Cargo for €7m.In July 2013 the government approved a restructuring plan under which ZSSK Cargo is to concentrate on freight operations, with its wagon management, intermodal and rolling stock maintenance activities to be taken over by three new subsidiaries. While ZSSK Cargo is to remain state-owned, international partners were sought to acquire stakes in the Cargo Wagon fleet management and ZSSK Cargo Intermodal businesses which were formally established in October 2013. ZSSK Cargo is to use the proceeds to reduce debt.Under the deal announced on June 6, AAE is to pay €7m for a 66% stake in Cargo Wagon, with ZSSK Cargo retaining 34%. Cargo Wagon will purchase 12 450 wagons from ZSSK Cargo for €180m, with 8 218 to be leased back to ZSSK Cargo under long-term contracts. ‘Apart from the price we offered, the comprehensive concept for the subsequent marketing of the wagons was decisive, supported by our many years of experience in this field as well as the spirit of partnership which we have developed with ZSSK and Slovakia over the last 20 years’, said AAE Group CEO Karsten Sachsenröder.last_img read more

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Dijon Dash Enyeama’s Hopes of Returning to Competitive Football

first_imgFormer Super Eagles captain Vincent Enyeama will have to remain without a club after his purported move to French Ligue 1 side Dijon FCO.Busybuddies had earlier reported that the former Lille shot-stopper was undergoing trials with Les Rouges in a bid to return to competitive football.Enyeama had been released by his former side in August 2018 after returning from an injury he suffered in April. He has been inactive for more than a year.Despite the setback, the 36-year-old is not ready to call it quits and even went on his official Instagram page to thank Dijon for giving him the opportunity to try out with the team.Meanwhile, Dijon are still in search for a goalkeeper after the departure of Bobby Allain whose contract ended after the 2018/2019 season. Relatedlast_img read more

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More Atlanta disruptions expected after power outage chaos

first_imgAirports can be very stressful Passengers at the world’s busiest airport in Atlanta are expecting another day of disruptions  after a power failure crippled operations on Sunday and canceled more than 1000 flights.The major operator at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson  International Airport, Delta Air Lines,  cancelled 900 flights Sunday and said another 300 cancellations were “on the books”  for Monday.Most of these would be early morning, inbound flights to Atlanta to give the operation there an opportunity to more quickly return to normal, it said.“Delta’s flight schedule in Atlanta is expected to return to normal by Monday afternoon,’’ Delta said on its website Sunday. “Delta is working hard to reaccommodate customers.”Atlanta is the world’s busiest airport and typically handles about 275,000 passengers a day. The power outage came as traffic is building up to in the busy holiday period.READ: Christmas crush as US holiday passengers top 50 million.Power was resumed after almost 11 hours on late Sunday and the fault was traced to a fire in a Georgia Power underground electrical facility.The intensity of the fire damaged two substations serving the airport, including the back-up facility.“We certainly understand that the outage has caused frustration and anger and we are doing everything that we can to get folks back home right away,” Atlanta mayor Kasim Reed told reporters.The blackout prompted the Federal Aviation Administration to declare a ground stop at the airport, preventing Atlanta-bound flights from taking off or those already en-route to be diverted.About 30,000 people in the terminal were affected by the outage and local authorities opened a convention center to accommodate people stranded overnight.AIrport authorities said they were delivering more than 5000 meals to passengers and they were offering free parking to affected passengers until 8am.CNN reported that passengers were left stranded in planes on the tarmac for up to seven hours.One of those who faced a marathon wait was CNN reporter Betsy Klein, who described passengers as exceedingly patient and who praised the crew and pilots.“But we have also all now been on this full @Delta plane since we boarded at 11:45 am and there hasn’t been food or water since late afternoon,’’ she said on Twitter.Klein reported that crew on her plane said 92 aircraft were stuck on the tarmac at one point and some ran out of fuel.last_img read more

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Joanna Krupa Says No To Fur Farming In Poland

first_imgJoanna Krupa has teamed with PETA to write to Polish prime minister Beata Szydło, urging her to ban fur farming in Poland.“Today, I would like to ask the government and all members of the Sejm to take a stand by advocating a ban on fur farming in Poland,” she wrote. “I was shocked to hear from my friends at PETA that Poland has become one of the biggest players in this cruel business in recent years, with nearly 11 million minks, foxes and raccoon dogs killed every year only for their fur.”Poland is the second largest fur farming country in Europe, second only to Denmark.

”Cannibalism, injuries, illness, lack of veterinary care, aggression and stereotypical types of behaviour were some of the systemic problems observed on Polish fur farms during investigations by Otwarte Klatki,” she wrote. “Social, intelligent and curious animals such as foxes, minks and raccoon dogs should not be confined, gassed, shot or electrocuted for luxury fashion.“To stop this unnecessary cruelty, fur farming must be banned, as it already has been in many countries, including Austria, Croatia, Slovenia and the United Kingdom. Fox farming is banned in Denmark and the Netherlands.“According to a 2014 public opinion poll by the Homo Homini polling institute, 55 per cent of the people in Poland already support a ban on fur farms. I would like to ask you to initiate a bill to ban fur farming in order to save the lives of millions of animals in the near future.”last_img read more

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NATIONAL PUBLIC BROADCASTERS ABC AND CBC ANNOUNCE CREATIVE AND COMMERCIAL COLLABORATION

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement At the Banff World Media Festival, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) announced a creative and commercial collaboration that will enhance the reach and impact of their content across both countries.The two national public broadcasters have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to co-develop English-language drama, comedy, factual, children’s and podcast content to maximize the value of their public funding for audiences. The three-year MOU will also provide further opportunities for co-financing and format sales of drama and children’s content.“At a time when public broadcasters are competing with the best content in the world, partnerships like this will ensure we can nurture and develop more distinct storytelling and co-finance ambitious projects with greater global reach,” said Catherine Tait, President & CEO, CBC/Radio-Canada. “This agreement will offer new opportunities for producers in Canada and Australia, and bring our top creators, talent and stories to broader audiences at home and around the world.” “In a world of global media giants, the outstanding and accessible content produced by like-minded public broadcasters is more important than ever,” said David Anderson, Managing Director, ABC. “This collaboration between the ABC and CBC will drive our limited resources further, leveraging our strengths to create and share distinctive local content that connects with audiences at home and overseas.”The MOU will enhance cooperation and collaboration between the ABC and CBC through initiatives such as:Children’s content: Co-development of children’s programs across television, audio and digital services, including two new proposed TV projects for 2 to 6-year-olds and 8 to 14-year-olds, and ABC’s acquisition of CBC Kids’ original commission Big Blue as well as CBC co-productions Kiri and Lou and the upcoming Sinking Ship sci-fi epic Endlings.Drama, comedy and factual content: Collaboration on comedy, drama and factual programs through co-development, finance or acquisitions that promote the core values of the public broadcasters.Educational content: Co-development of a media literacy initiative to equip schools and educators across both countries with the analytical skills and tools to combat misinformation and disinformation.Audio content: Expansion of radio program exchanges between ABC RN and CBC Radio, plus the sharing of creative ideas and expertise between ABC Audio Studios and CBC Podcasts to create new podcasts.News content: Sharing of technology and tools to improve tracking and verification of the accuracy of news content.Local and regional communities: Collaboration on initiatives to better serve local and rural communities, including local journalism projects.Employee exchange: To ensure the success of such initiatives, the ABC and CBC will facilitate employee exchanges where appropriate and feasible.The MOU will build on an existing relationship that includes CBC’s acquisition of the broadcast rights to ABC programs Ronny Chieng: International Student, Mustangs FC, Hannah Gadsby’s Nakedy Nudes, Hannah Gadsby’s Oz and the format rights to the ABC’s original series You Can’t Ask That. CBC’s Canadian version of the award-winning format launches on the CBC Gem streaming service in June.The broadcasters also have a strong history of sharing audio content such as CBC Podcasts Alone: A Love Story and Someone Knows Something and ABC podcasts Trace and Ladies, We Need To Talk, plus ABC RN programs All in the Mind and Off Track and CBC Radio’s Ideas and Out In The Open. With more than 20 million downloads each month, the CBC is Canada’s number-one podcaster. The ABC is Australia’s leading podcast producer.About the ABCThe ABC is the independent source of Australian conversations, culture and stories, delivering commercial-free, free-to-air content across Australia and the Pacific region via a multiplatform multi-channel network. The ABC is Australia’s leading national public broadcaster and the destination of choice for viewers and users seeking quality and diversity in content across television, radio and digital platforms, engaging audiences in distinctly Australian content across a wide variety of genres. About CBC/Radio-CanadaCBC/Radio-Canada is Canada’s national public broadcaster. Through our mandate to inform, enlighten and entertain, we play a central role in strengthening Canadian culture. As Canada’s trusted news source, we offer a uniquely Canadian perspective on news, current affairs and world affairs. Our distinctively homegrown entertainment programming draws audiences from across the country. Deeply rooted in communities, CBC/Radio-Canada offers diverse content in English, French and eight Indigenous languages. We also deliver content in Spanish, Arabic and Chinese, as well as both official languages, through Radio Canada International (RCI). We are leading the transformation to meet the needs of Canadians in a digital world. Advertisement Twitter Facebooklast_img read more

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