Masson gets first win at LPGA Manulife Classic

first_imgCAMBRIDGE, Ontario – Caroline Masson broke out of a star-filled pack Sunday to win the LPGA Manulife Classic for her first tour title. The 27-year-old German player rebounded from an opening double bogey to make nine birdies in a 5-under 67. She beat third-round leader Mi Hyang Lee, Minjee Lee and Solheim Cup teammate Karine Icher by a stroke, finishing at 16-under 272 at Whistle Bear. Masson joined Anna Nordqvist and Brittany Lang as the only players over 23 years old to win in the first 24 events this season – and also joined Nordqvist as the only European winners. Mi Hyang Lee had a 71, Minjee Lee shot 68, and Icher 66. Mi Hyang Lee parred the final two holes to miss a chance for a playoff. Masson didn’t make a par until the seventh hole, following the double bogey with three straight birdies, a bogey on No. 5 and a birdied on the sixth. The former Oklahoma State player had four straight birdies on Nos. 9-12, bogeyed the par-4 13th and birdied the par-5 16th. She birdied all four par 5s. Ariya Jutanugarn tied for fifth at 14 under in her bid to win three straight events for the second time this season. The second-ranked Jutanugarn made two late bogeys in a 70. Top-ranked Lydia Ko and 2015 winner Suzann Pettersen also were 14 under. Ko had a 68, and Pettersen finished with a 66. Canadian star Brooke Henderson tied for 39th at 7 under after a 71.last_img read more

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With no budget for rural internet nobodys made a plan auditor says

first_imgOTTAWA — Canada’s auditor general says people who live in rural and remote parts of the country don’t have high-speed internet access because the federal government doesn’t want to pay for a plan to give it to them.In a report Tuesday, Michael Ferguson says the government has been told again and again by different authorities that Canada needs a national broadband strategy, so people who live outside cities don’t get left behind in the digital economy. Without high-speed internet connections, people can lose out on everything from job opportunities to medical treatment.Ferguson says that in 2013, a government analysis found that running high-speed internet to 99 per cent of Canadians would cost between $1.1 billion and $1.7 billion.But governments haven’t wanted to set a budget for carrying out a plan, so the innovation and economic development department hasn’t made one up.Two partial programs, totalling $740 million, didn’t give bidders enough information to put together really useful proposals, and also didn’t check whether the projects they proposed might have been done without public funding. So they did not get as much bang for the buck as they could have.The auditor says the first step the government should take is to set a standard for the minimum amount of internet connectivity Canadians can expect in different parts of the country, and work on a plan from there.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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