House Passes Charities Act

first_imgRelatedContractor General Report on Spalding Market Tabled in the House A Bill to introduce a single piece of legislation to regulate all charitable organisations, whether intending to, or already operating in the country, was passed in the House of Representatives on Tuesday, October 29.The Charities Act 2013 is a key part of the Extended Fund Facility between Jamaica and the International Monetary Fund (IMF).It makes provision for the establishment of a comprehensive legal and institutional framework and will facilitate the registration, regulation, administration and governance of the private voluntary sector operating in Jamaica.In his contribution, Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Finance and Planning, Hon. Horace Dalley, noted that the Charities Act is designed to maintain, protect and enhance public trust and confidence in charitable organisations.“We, in the Ministry, understand how difficult it is with the many requests that come in each day/week for discretionary relief for charitable purposes,” Mr. Dalley said.For the 2010/11 financial year, the Government granted waivers to charitable organisations amounting to $4 billion, while the sum for 2011/12 was $2 billion.The Charities Bill provides a definition for charitable organisations and the designation of the registrar of charitable organisations by the responsible Minister, which will keep and maintain a register of all registered charitable organisations. It also stipulates the designation of a person or body as the Charities Authority.Among the functions of the Authority are: to receive, process and determine applications for registration under the Act; make appropriate information available to assist persons to make applications for registration under the Act; monitor and promote compliance with the Act and any regulations; and to ensure that registered charitable organisations are not misused for criminal purpose or controlled by persons engaged in criminal activities.In closing the debate, Minister of Industry, Investment and Commerce, Hon. Anthony Hylton, expressed his appreciation for the contributions made to the Bill.The legislation was passed with three amendments and will be sent to the Senate for its approval. Story HighlightsA Bill to introduce a single piece of legislation to regulate all charitable organisations.The Charities Act 2013 is a key part of the Extended Fund Facility between Jamaica and the IMF.It makes provision for the establishment of a comprehensive legal and institutional framework and will facilitate the registration. House Passes Charities Act ParliamentOctober 31, 2013Written by: Latonya Linton RelatedWork to Expand Kingston Terminal on Stream Advertisementscenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail House Passes Charities ActJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of Finance and Planning, Dr. the Hon. Peter Phillips addresses parliament on October 29. RelatedGov’t Reviews Draft Action Plan to Eliminate Gender-Based Violencelast_img read more

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We could be heroes: new rh+ apparel for long days in…

first_img Related Cycling apparel specialist rh+ has presented its Hero Spring/Summer 2017 collection. Featuring within the rh+ Endurance collection, the Hero apparel is designed to ‘give the maximum during long rides, whether on asphalt or gravel roads’. rh+ adds that the Hero range products ‘show the best of what the rh+ Research and Development Laboratory, PowerLogic Lab, has designed to ensure comfort and energy management thanks to better thermoregulation.’The Hero Jersey is made of Polartec Power Dry, a fabric for breathability, quick drying and lightness. In addition, the special Slim Fit construction, pre-shaped in the riding position, aims to ensure the best fit, while the Cargo Pocket system, with 3 large rear and other 2 thinner side pockets, allows the rider to carry everything from arm warmers, a shell, energy bars and smartphone; and a fifth mini zip pocket is reserved for valuables.The Hero Bibshorts complete the outfit: in addition to the Elastic Interface Liege dual density pad, they are made of a fabric with differentiated compression areas. The back is made of breathable 3D mesh and the braces use a soft, elastic, perforated fabric. They also feature ultra-flat stretch seams and a Grip Fit XLight leg gripper with anti-slip silicone.Hero JerseyRiding position preshaped SLIM Fit constructionPolartec Power Dry breathable fabric (100% PL)Breathable and stretch mesh back and side inserts (100% PL)5 pockets: 3 rear Cargo + 2 Slim SideGrip Fit Xlight waist gripper with anti-slip inner siliconeRear zipped mini pocket for valuesFull zip with custom self-locking camlockThermoformed microfibre front zip garageReflective back applicationsUV ProtectionHero BibshortsElastic Interface Liege pad: double density, road & off-road, also for long distancesFD Gold fabric with differentiated compression areas (40% PA 40% PL 20% EA)3D breathable mesh back with soft openwork bracesGrip Fit Xlight leg gripper with anti-slip inner siliconeUltra flat stretch seamsReflective back applicationsUV ProtectionA brand of the organization Zero Industry S.r.l., rh+ is based in Lentate sul Seveso, in the province of Monza, in Italy. It designs and produces technical apparel, helmets and goggles dedicated to the cyclist who is looking for ‘performance, uncompromising quality, design and Italian style.’ Zero Industry itself develops and sells products divided into four business units: Cycling, Snow, Eyewear and Urban. rh+ has an e-commerce site and an established international distribution network that covers 22 countries, spanning Europe, Asia, Africa and North America.www.zerorh.comlast_img read more

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ORE Catapult: Urgent Action Is Needed to Bolster the UK’s Wave and Tidal Industries

first_imgUrgent action is needed to bolster the UK’s wave and tidal industries and get investors back in play, according to a report published today by the Offshore Renewable Energy (ORE) Catapult, the UK body supporting innovation and rapid commercialisation in offshore wind, wave and tidal technologies.The report highlights that this strategically important market could be worth around £76bn to the UK economy, cumulatively by 2050. But funding for first arrays and technology proving has become less certain as investors have been either unwilling to invest, or have been pulling out of the market due to lack of clarity on future investment return and timing.More investment from both the public and private sectors is needed to get the first tidal arrays to financial close, and drive the wave industry along the path to commercial readiness – it is estimated the tidal industry may need upwards of £100 million and the wave industry almost double that.The report discusses a number of ways in which the industry can get investor confidence back to secure the vital funding required. ORE Catapult has identified five targeted actions to accelerate commercialisation of technology and de-risk investment into the marine energy sector. These include:greater alignment of the ways in which technologies are assessed;standardisation in the approach taken to developing technologies;greater coordination between private and public sector investors;greater coordination of due diligence for both projects and technologies;a potential role for government in underwriting debt finance for the industry.Commenting on the report, ORE Catapult’s Strategy & Commercialisation Director Dr Stephen Wyatt said: “Wave and tidal technologies represent a vital part of our future renewable energy mix in terms of the social and economic benefits they bring, but sector funding has reached a critical juncture and it is vital we act now in order to bolster this strategically important market for the UK economy.  “The Catapult is already working with industry and others, particularly academia, to focus research priorities around wider critical path components which have less to do with a developer’s intellectual property, and more to do with issues around reliability, health and safety, installation methodology, and electrical connections, to de-risk and drive down industry costs.“Within the marine sector, we are involved in a number of joint industry projects, such as the Marine Farm Accelerator (MFA) programme, which we lead in collaboration with The Carbon Trust. With commercial-scale marine energy farms close to deployment in UK waters, the MFA project is working to develop technologies that are essential for these energy arrays and accelerating their development to de-risk technology and enable future cost savings.” Press release; Image: Aquamarine Power (Illustration)last_img read more

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5 ways Beatles producer George Martin influenced pop culture

first_imgYou may not recognize his name, but you recognize George Martin’s sound. The man who brought the world the Beatles revolutionized modern music in more ways than we realize.As producer Mark Ronson tweeted, “We will never stop living in the world you helped create.”Here are five contributions from Martin’s 90-year life:FILE – In this Oct. 30, 2002, file photo, Beatles producer George Martin touches a statue of John Lennon in a park in the Vedado neighborhood of Havana, during his visit to Cuba. George Martin, the producer who guided the Beatles to astounding heights, has died, his manager said on March 9, 2016. He was 90. (AP Photo/Cristobal Herrera, File)THE BEATLESHis most obvious, lasting accomplishment (though not the only musicians he managed). He signed John, Paul, George and Ringo in the early 1960s and transformed them into the legendary Fab Four. Their albums became art forms, reaching listeners on all continents and exploring new recording techniques. Their relationship, too, broke new ground: The performers gradually took the upper hand over their producer, composing their own material in an era when that was rare, while he translated their vision into top-selling hits.MULTI-TRACK RECORDINGWith the multitude — or cacophony — of musical possibilities today, it’s hard to imagine a time when music was recorded on single tracks. Martin used emerging multiple-track technology to experiment with the Beatles, producing a new kind of music that could only be made in a studio. Different sounds and instruments could be layered, each one adjusted and cleaned up, accelerated or reversed. From the two-track “Please Please Me” in 1963 to the eight-track “Hey Jude,” that expanded what was expected from recorded music.COMEDY RECORDSMartin helped bring smiles to living rooms around the English-speaking world by pioneering the comedy album in the 1950s, working with Peter Sellers, Spike Milligan and others. He told BBC radio in 1982 that as a young producer at Parlophone, “because we had no American imports, I had to find my own way of making hit records. (Comedy) was my way of getting in between the cracks.”CLASSICAL INFLUENCE ON ROCKA man forever associated with pop music had a classical core — he mastered Chopin by ear as a youth and was trained at London’s Guildhall School of Music. Martin broke down the classical-pop barrier of the time by bringing his background to some Beatles records. The most recognizable example: the string quartet on “Yesterday.” Paul McCartney initially scoffed at the idea and later reveled at the result — and described it Wednesday as one of his fondest Martin memories.JAMES BOND MUSICAction films didn’t enjoy chart-topping theme songs until the 1960s. Martin helped produce Shirley Bassey’s “Goldfinger” in 1964 and later scored McCartney’s “Live and Let Die” in 1971. Superstars from Duran Duran to Adele have since followed in their footsteps.last_img read more

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