Officials close all Mississippi beaches due to blue-green harmful algal bloom

first_imgCrackerClips/iStock(JACKSON, Miss.) — All 21 of Mississippi’s beaches have been shuttered for swimming due to the presence of toxic algae.The Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality announced two additional closures on Sunday due to a blue-green harmful algal bloom, after previous closures were issued for the 19 other beaches along the state’s Gulf Coast. The two beaches that were shut down on Sunday are in Pascagoula, Mississippi, on the Alabama border.The Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality is urging people and their pets to avoid water contact in the affected areas, such as swimming, wading or fishing, and to avoid eating anything taken from the waters “until further notice.”“The closure refer to water contact and does not prohibit use of the sand portion of a beach,” the state agency said in a statement. “The algae can cause rashes, stomach cramps, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting.”Every U.S. coastal and Great Lakes state experiences harmful algal blooms, or HABs, which occur in fresh, salt and brackish water bodies when algae colonies “grow out of control and produce toxic or harmful effects on people, fish, shellfish, marine mammals and birds,” according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).Human illnesses caused by the blooms are rare, but can be debilitating or even fatal.“I had a feeling it was going this way. Water always flows west to east,” Pascagoula resident Bill Kenan told Biloxi ABC affiliate WLOX-TV. “It just keeps going and going and going. I don’t know if it’s ever going to get better. I hope it does.”Climate change and increases in nutrient levels of bodies of water due to fertilizer run-off are potentially causing HABs to occur more often and in areas not previously affected, according to the NOAA. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Skeletons, Ghosts, And Goblins, Oh My!

first_imgThere’s something for everyone on the East End and this Halloween will have all sorts of fun for all ages. Here are just a few of the amazing family events that will be starting shortly.Southampton offers up the Haunted Rogers Mansion, running from 11 AM to 4 PM, Wednesday, October 24, through Friday, October 26, and November 2 and 3. Spooky spirits have taken over the Rogers Mansion on 17 Meeting House Lane. Explore the creepy exhibits for a $5 entry fee and keep an eye out for Captain Albert Rogers. Southampton will also host the 18th Annual Little Lucy’s Halloween Pet Parade on Saturday, October 27, at 1 PM. Finally, children nine and under can join the Southampton High School Student Council in costume at Agawam Park. The fun starts at 11:45 AM with tons of games and other fun activities, but be sure to stay for the costume parade through the village at 1 PM.Bridgehampton will kick off the scares with its Halloween Bash on Friday, October 26, at the Children’s Museum of the East End. Expect everything from trick-or-treating to costume contests to fun Halloween games throughout the day. Note that advance registration is required. Fairview Farm will host pumpkin picking, corn mazes, and a corn cannon. Finally, the Hampton Library will host a Halloween Parade on Saturday, October 27, at 10 AM.Sag Harbor will have a ghost walking tour through the village on Friday, October 26, from 6 to 8 PM. The tour will start at the Sag Harbor Whaling and Historical Museum. Sag Harbor’s Bay Street Theater will also perform Frankenstein Follies at 7:30 PM on October 26 and October 27.The 30th Annual Spooky Walk will be held at Camp Pa-Qua-Tuck in Center Moriches. This 45-minute walk of terror is not for the faint of heart and it will run from 7 to 9 PM on Friday, October 26, and Saturday, October 27, with a $20 entry fee at the gate. Baiting Hollow Scout camp will also have a Halloween celebration from 10 AM to 4 PM on October 27. Expect everything from hayrides to pumpkin patches.The Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton Village will host a Halloween Open House on Saturday, October 27, from 2 to 4 PM. Come and enjoy treats and exciting Halloween tales while exploring the spooky Halloween decorations of the LVIS house and dollhouse. All are welcome!Riverhead will host its Halloween festival on Main Street along the Peconic Riverfront beginning Saturday, October 27 at 11:30 AM. Parades, pumpkin carving, and coffin races will run through Main Street until October 29. The Long Island Aquarium will also open its doors on October 27 to penguin costume parades, scavenger hunts, and book signings. All children 12 and under in costume will get half off their admission.There are three different Harbes Farm locations — Jamesport, Mattituck, and Riverhead — hosting activities this weekend. The Harbes Farm in Jamesport will sport a six-acre maze and pumpkin picking. The Mattituck farm will feature a variety of Halloween activities, and the Harbes Orchard in Riverhead will sport corn mazes and pony rides.Water Mill has eight acres of pumpkins ready to be picked off the vine and numerous Halloween activities at Hank’s Pumpkintown. There will also be arts and crafts at Ethan Allen for all ages. This will begin at 3 PM on October 27 and continue until 4 PM. The Shoppes at East Wind in Wading River will be hosting a Safe Trick or Treat from 12 to 7 PM on October 31. There will be non-food items and allergy free treats for all to enjoy. Wear your costumes. Rain or [email protected] Sharelast_img read more

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A long, hard look

first_imgThe tragedy that unfolded on 14 June at Grenfell Tower is likely to have far-reaching ramifications for both the housing and construction sectors.There are two levels of debate that arise here. Firstly, the wider political implications of failure in broader housing policy and regulation; and secondly, the actions of the construction industry.Head of the upcoming public inquiry, Sir Martin Moore-Bick, has already stated that he will concentrate on the facts surrounding the Grenfell Tower fire, and not address wider policy. But there must have been a major failure within the end-to-end process of regulating, designing, procuring, constructing and managing housing stock. Whether it has been contributed to by the construction industry’s own delivery failings will become clear. But confusion over cladding testing is already perpetuating the feeling that some of our most important industry standards are indeterminate, lack transparency and appear open to gamification or playing the system.Recently, there has been a significant negative shift in public perception of the housing industry beyond the world of social housing. The growing sense that there is inequality in the housing market, now amplified by Grenfell Tower, is reinforced by stories of developers exploiting a system that looks increasingly flawed. Increasing reliance on individual investors buying units has further muddied the waters, leading to accusations that developers are busy building safe deposit boxes and pension plans instead of decent accommodation.The build-to-rent sector has not escaped criticism either, with some permitted development conversion schemes for rent being labelled poor quality, while some premium rental products are accused of being unaffordable and unaligned to real market need.Let’s not forget the discontent brewing that Help to Buy is seen to have become a structural subsidy for the larger housebuilders’ profits.Meanwhile, in the public sector, as registered providers seek to reduce reliance on declining government grants and local authorities look to create income, their transition to quasi-private sector business models has led some to question their core social purpose.Whether any of these observations are justified is of course open to extensive and emotive debate but increasingly negative public perception is now becoming the residential development industry’s reality. The homebuilding sector fundamentally needs to be building more genuinely affordable, high-quality homes more quickly in the right places across a variety of tenures. This is the crux of our so-called market failure conundrum. And something must be done about it.The simple answer to all of this has to be led by policy and regulation. Without pre-empting specifics, the Grenfell Tower disaster is highly likely to lead to a tightening of regulations and an increase in both public and private sector clients’ awareness of potential reputational, statutory and indeed criminal risk in not demanding the very best standards of construction and specifying and procuring accordingly. This will put further pressure on existing skills, unfortunately, and will potentially reduce available supply chain capacity through “raising the bar”.If there has ever been a moment to step up efforts to invest and innovate in how we organise and deliver, surely this is it?The land market also lies at the heart of housing supply and affordability problems and there is a growing cross-party consensus on the problem of land value speculation. Any intervention here of course brings with it the risk of unintended consequences but the call for action is growing.But it’s not just up to the government. If there has ever been a moment to step up efforts to invest and innovate in how we organise and deliver, ruthlessly pursuing the attainment of better quality, efficiency and safety, surely this is it? We need improved skills and training, embracing increasing use of technology and more high quality, accredited pre-manufacturing solutions, all supported by a better integrated delivery model. This is the only way we will consistently deliver a better standard at the higher levels of housing output that we desperately need in this country.All of this ultimately needs to be paid for out of improved productivity, not by reducing supply chain margins or by charging clients more. Major businesses spanning clients, contractors, consultants and suppliers need to urgently think about how they can demonstrate pre-emptive leadership here that the willing and responsible part of the rest of the industry can then follow.And finally, if the need for this industry to improve its standards wasn’t clear enough, consider the fact that we continue to kill people in the process of building the very things that are being accused of now being unsafe. Just one week after the Grenfell disaster, two people were killed on a construction site in Crewe. Our industry fatalities amount to the cumulative equivalent of the current official Grenfell Tower death toll of 80, every two to three years.No doubt many will read this article and immediately move onto their day-to-day business, assuming the challenge I set out here is someone else’s problem. That attitude is one that has characterised our past. We need a different future – one that uses the awful events at Grenfell Tower as an unprecedented collective impetus for change.Mark Farmer is founding director and chief executive at consultant Cast and author of the industry report Modernise or Dielast_img read more

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Racist chants half Ligue 1 relegation battle and Lyon crash again

first_imgThe match ended 0-0, but for a few minutes it seemed it might be abandoned.In the late game, Lyon dropped three star players, who had reportedly fought in training, and crashed to a third straight defeat, losing 2-1 away to another relegation-haunted team, Nantes In Dijon, the game was stopped in the 78th minute as players from both sides headed towards the touchline of the Stade Gaston-Gerard after Gouano said he heard insults from behind the goal his side was defending.“It’s over,” Gouano, the team captain, said. “We’re not playing on. I’m taking off my team-mates. We’re going to the changing room.”Following discussions between players, coaches and officials Gouano approached the stand by pointing toward supporters in the crowd. Play then resumed.“We are in the 21st century, it’s unacceptable, I marked the incident by stopping play because these days we are all equal,” Gouano told French broadcaster BeIn Sport after the game.“Of course there are colours, but you have to rise above it. We are all human beings. The key word for me is love. You have to love the person next to you,” he added.Paris-born Gouano said in March he wished to represent the Ivory Coast.The incident comes after rising Italy star Moise Kean was targeted by racist abuse in Cagliari after he scored for Juventus in Serie A earlier in the month.“I didn’t hear the chants but if there were of course we totally support the cause, like with Blaise Matuidi at Juventus, when he wanted to stop the match,” Dijon forward Benjamin Jeannot told BeIn Sport.“I find it normal he wanted the game stopped, it’s not easy to control, I deeply support him,” he added.After the game the French league said it would investigate and also announced that Dijon had identified the culprit. The club said they intended to press charges. In Nantes, Lyon dropped Marcelo, Nabil Fekir and Memphis Depay, three stars who have played poorly in the club’s recent catastrophic run, as well a Ferland Mendy. French television reported before the game that the four men were involved in a pair of bust ups at training on Thursday. Depay’s exile only lasted until the 34th minute when he came on for the injured Lucas Tousart with Lyon already trailing to a goal by Kalifa Coulibaly. Martin Terrier levelled before half time but Anthony Limbombe scored the winner with seven minutes to play.Lyon stay adrift in third, six points behind Lille in second and five ahead of Saint-Etienne. Nantes moved nine points clear of Dijon who occupy the first potential relegation place.“At the end of the season, we’re going to have to ask some tough questions,” Lyon president Jean-Michel Aulas told the waiting microphones after the game.last_img read more

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