River Rat Brewery Takes Home World Beer Cup Medal

first_imgHome Industry News Releases Beer Business River Rat Brewery Takes Home World Beer Cup MedalIndustry News ReleasesBeer BusinessRiver Rat Brewery Takes Home World Beer Cup MedalBy Press Release – June 27, 2016 100 0 Pinterest Facebook Share Twitter Linkedin TAGSConsumerRiver Rat Brewery Previous articleSonoma County Grape Growers Foundation Offers Progress Report and Announces New Board MembersNext articleCalifornia Women for Agriculture San Luis Obispo County Chapter Awards $10,000 in Scholarships to 25 Local Youth Press Release ReddIt Email AdvertisementCOLUMBIA, SC – June 27, 2016 – River Rat Brewery is proud to announce that its Bohemian Pilsner took home the bronze medal at the 2016 World Beer Cup. This year’s competition saw 6,596 beers from 1,907 breweries representing 55 countries. The elite international panel of judges consisted of 253 people from 31 countries, giving out 287 total awards over 96 categories. River Rat bested the 64 other entrants in their category.“The world beer cup is literally the Grand Poobah of the beer competitions,” said River Rat Owner Mike Tourville. “It’s bigger than the Great American Beer Festival. It’s an international competition and you’re up against people from all over the world. This is huge for River Rat. It shows that we offer a top-shelf product and are pushing the craft beer scene in Columbia forward.”Three-quarters of the judges travelled to Philadelphia for the competition from outside the U.S., making it the most international panel of judges ever.“Judges commented throughout the week that overall beer quality continues to improve across the spectrum of world beer styles,” said Chris Swersey, competition manager, World Beer Cup.” While breweries may hold the awards, beer drinkers around the world are the true winners.”To go along with their big win at the World Beer Cup, River Rat won another bronze medal for its Bohemian Pilsner at the Los Angeles International Beer Competition. River Rat wasn’t done, and it grabbed two more awards for its My Morning Stout and Moncks Corner Abbey Ale at the Alltech Craft Beers and Food Fest on May 21.River Rat Brewery is located at 1231 Shop Road in Columbia, SC and its taproom is open TuesdaySunday. They offer growler sales, a dynamic and growing food selection, brewery tours on a first come first serve basis, and a wonderful outside deck to relax on with your dog! Visit www.riverratbrewery.com or contact us for any additional information.Where the Saluda and Broad Rivers merge, they form the mighty Congaree in ColaTown, SC! River Rat Brewery was founded in 2013, was named for the three rivers that run through the city, and the working-class men who labored on the canal in Columbia more than a century ago. In their honor, we set out to create craft beers that would satisfy anyone after a long day’s work. Using only the best ingredients, we tested and refined to develop complex flavors and the best damn beer we’ve ever tasted.Advertisement last_img read more

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Appointment of the National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons

first_imgThe Government of Jamaica (GoJ) is constantly on a path of pursuing progressive initiatives in its fight against trafficking in persons. In keeping with this commitment, the Government of Jamaica has deemed it appropriate to appoint a National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons and Cabinet has approved the appointment of the Children’s Advocate, Diahann Gordon Harrison, as Jamaica’s National Rapporteur for this purpose.This appointment makes Jamaica the first Caribbean nation to embrace this approach; it is believed that this can only serve to enhance Jamaica’s anti-trafficking profile and exhibits the seriousness with which the Government of Jamaica regards this issue.The Government of Jamaica is confident that the independence attached to the Children’s Advocate by virtue of statute, coupled with the fact that the Children’s Advocate already has a direct reporting channel to the Houses of Parliament, makes this appointment a good fit.One of the primary functions of the National Rapporteur will be to create a more objective reporting system on the issue of trafficking in the country.  In addition, the National Rapporteur will, inter alia, have the authority to obtain from the relevant authorities, including the Director of Public Prosecutions and the TIP Unit in the Jamaica Constabulary Force, any information necessary to carry out her stated duties; to conduct independent examinations/investigations of reports of alleged instances of human trafficking where the need arises; to report on violations, wherever they may occur, of the rights of victims, as well as discrimination, threats or use of violence, harassment, intimidation or reprisals directed at persons exercising these rights; and to provide an analytical overview of the situation in trafficking in an annual report to the Government of Jamaica. These powers of the National Rapporteur are consistent with internationally accepted best practice and are parallel to National Rapporteur mechanisms in other jurisdictions.Trafficking in Persons is a global phenomenon that affects all countries, both small and large. The efforts of the National Rapporteur are fully supported by the Ministries of National Security and Justice as well as Civic Society.The Government of Jamaica remains committed to strengthening its measures to combat and eliminate all forms of trafficking in persons and will continue to seek identified sources of best practices as well as measures to enhance its anti- trafficking performance. Appointment of the National Rapporteur on Trafficking in PersonsJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Story HighlightsThe Government of Jamaica has deemed it appropriate to appoint a National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons.Cabinet has approved the appointment of the Children’s Advocate, Diahann Gordon Harrison, as Jamaica’s National Rapporteur for this purpose.This appointment makes Jamaica the first Caribbean nation to embrace this approach. RelatedPolice Remove Over 300 Registration Plates from Defective Vehicles Photo: JIS PhotographerChildren’s Advocate, Diahann Gordon Harrison. RelatedPedestrians Urged to be More Careful on the Roadscenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail RelatedSmart Policing a Central Strategy in Crime Fighting Appointment of the National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons National SecurityMarch 10, 2015Written by: Ministry of National Security, Communications & Public Affairs Advertisementslast_img read more

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Torrey story

first_imgSAN DIEGO – Tiger Woods made his 2014 debut in a most dubious fashion – his first trip to Torrey Pines without sticking around until Sunday. Woods went seven straight holes making bogey or worse and wound up with a 7-over 79 in the Farmers Insurance Open to match his worst score on American soil. For the first time in his career, he missed a 54-hole cut that is in effect when more than 78 players make it to the weekend. Woods had to rally just to break 80. After another poor chip on the par-3 eighth hole (his 17th of the third round), he chipped in to save par. On the par-5 ninth hole, he flubbed another chip to about 8 feet and made that for par and a 79. Asked to stop for a comment with CBS Sports, Woods said, ”No, I’m done.” He signed a dozen autographs, climbed into a van and was driven away. Farmers Insurance Open: Articles, videos and photos [[{“type”:”media”,”view_mode”:”media_large”,”fid”:”526131″,”attributes”:{“alt”:””,”class”:”media-image”,”height”:”306″,”typeof”:”foaf:Image”,”width”:”480″}}]] Perhaps the most remarkable figure of this week: He didn’t make a single birdie on a par 5 over three rounds. In fact, he played them in 4 over par. Still, what made the round so shocking is where it happened. Woods was the defending champion and an eight-time winner at Torrey Pines as a pro, which includes his last major in the 2008 U.S. Open. He won a Junior World Championship on this public course along the ocean as a teenager. Woods had finished out of the top 10 only one time at Torrey on the PGA Tour, and that was in 2011 when his game was going through a major overhaul. ”It was definitely different seeing him make so many bogeys,” said Jhonattan Vegas, who played alongside Woods on a gorgeous day with very little wind. ”He’s human. You don’t expect to see that, but it’s the game. It happens to everyone. And it happened to him today.” The highest score of Woods’ career was an 81 in the third round of the British Open at Muirfield, when he played most of his round in 40 mph wind and rain. Woods also had a 79 in the Memorial last year, at the Quail Hollow Championship in 2010 and in the first round of the 1996 Australian Open. As stunning as it was to see, there was little cause for alarm. This makes the second straight year that Woods was eliminated early in his season-opening tournament. He missed the cut in Abu Dhabi a year ago after being assessed a two-shot penalty for taking relief from a sandy area. Woods went on to win five times last year and was voted PGA Tour Player of the Year for the 11th time. He spoke earlier in the week about being only a fraction off, which was plausible given the conditions at Torrey, especially on the South Course. For as dry as it has been this week, the rough is thicker and more lush than usual, especially right off the edge of the fairway. On the opening hole, Woods narrowly missed the fairway and could only advance the ball some 80 yards. But he went south quickly on the fabled South Course. Woods was in the fairway, 254 yards from the flag on the par-5 18th in the middle of his round. A birdie would have put him within five shots of the leaders, who had just started the third round on the front. His shot came up short and into the water, and his fourth shot flew the green into a plugged lie in the bunker. Woods blasted out and took two putts for bogey. On the first hole, he missed the green and chipped to 30 feet and three-putted for another double bogey, missing his bogey putt from just over 2 feet. It was the first time since the second round of the 2011 PGA Championship that he made consecutive double bogeys. And then it was just one blunder after another – a three-putt on the par-3 third, a tee shot into the bunker on the fourth. From a front bunker on the par-5 sixth, he flew the green, chipped weakly to 6 feet and missed that par putt. So when he ended that ugly streak with a birdie on the seventh, he removed his cap and waved to the crowd. In the midst of this meltdown, Woods still found some perspective. Walking up the hill to the ninth tee, he spotted CBS Sports reporter Peter Kostis, working his first tournament since his bout with prostate cancer. Woods and Kostis have had their disagreements over the years, but the world’s No. 1 player called out to him three times. Kostis walked over and Woods whispered into his ear that it was good to see him back at work. Woods now goes to the Omega Dubai Desert Classic next week. There’s a chance he might not show up at another PGA Tour event until Florida.last_img read more

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Portugal confronts its slave trade past

first_imgThe Atlantic slave trade started in 1444, when 235 people snatched from the newly-discovered coast of West Africa were put up for sale in Lagos, now a laidback Portuguese beach resort on Europe’s southwestern tip.A graffiti in an area known as “Little Africa,” located near the Valongo slave wharf in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil | Mario Tama/Getty ImagesChronicler Gomes Eanes de Zurara was on hand. “Children, seeing themselves removed from their parents, ran hastily towards them,” he wrote. “Mothers clasped their children in their arms, and holding them, cast themselves upon the ground, covering them with their bodies, without heeding the blows which they were given.”Over the next four centuries, Portuguese vessels would carry an estimated 5.8 million Africans into slavery. Most went to Brazil — a Portuguese colony until 1822.A ‘whitewashed vision’?Controversy over how Portugal should mark its role in the slave trade flared up last spring when President Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa paid a state visit to Senegal.Touring Gorée Island, an infamous departure point for slave ships, he said Portugal had recognized the “injustice of slavery” when it introduced limited abolitionist laws in 1760s. He did not follow leaders such as Pope John Paul II and Brazilian President Lula da Silva who issued apologies there.A group of over 50 outraged intellectuals wrote to complain. “The president’s words have revived the whitewashed vision of colonial oppression that’s still very popular among the most retrograde sectors of Portuguese society,” they said in an open letter. LISBON — Over five centuries after it launched the Atlantic slave trade, Portugal is preparing to build a memorial to the millions of Africans its ships carried into bondage.Citizens of Lisbon voted in December for the monument to be built on a quayside where slave ships once unloaded. Yet although the memorial has broad support, a divisive debate has ignited over how Portugal faces up to its colonial past and multiracial present.“Doing this will be really good for our city,” said Beatriz Gomes Dias, president of Djass, an association of Afro-Portuguese citizens that launched the memorial plan. “People really got behind the project, there was a recognition that something like this is needed,” said Gomes Dias. “Many people told us this is important to bring justice to Portugal’s history here in Lisbon, which is a cosmopolitan and diverse capital with such a strong African presence.”Portuguese vessels carried an estimated 5.8 million Africans into slavery.However, some fear that history risks being hijacked by politics.“I think it’s a good idea, but those behind this monument want to perpetuate a particular vision which, up to a certain point, is a myth,” said historian João Pedro Marques.Slavery was a “barbarity,” said Marques, who has written several books on the subject. However, by the time it reached its height, he said, Lisbon played only a marginal role in a trade conducted directly between merchants in Angola and Brazil.“The idea that Lisbon was the capital of the slave trade is a complete lie,” he said. “This is part of a political strategy … the far-left in Portugal is stirring this up. They are putting this on the political agenda.” Portuguese President Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa, center, visits the House of Slaves, a museum and memorial to the Atlantic slave trade on Goree Island, off the coast of the city of Dakar, Senegal | Moussa Sow/AFP via Getty ImagesOthers raced to Rebelo de Sousa’s defense, triggering a battle on opinion pages and social media that’s been ignited again with the debate over the slavery memorial.“Building a memorial on the banks of the River Tagus is an excellent idea,” António Barreto, a  political commentator and former Socialist Party lawmaker, wrote in the Diário de Notícias newspaper.“So long as it’s not a monument to self-flagellation which, for reasons of historical opportunism and political demagogy, aims to show that Portuguese colonialism was crueler than the others,” he wrote.Slavery casts a shadow over what Portuguese history portrays as a golden age when brave men in small boats set out to forge the first maritime routes linking Europe to sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and South America in the 15th and 16th centuries.The Age of Discoveries made this small country on Europe’s margins a global power and the exploits of those early explorers remain at the heart of national identity.A belief lingers among Portuguese that their country’s colonialism was gentler than other European empires. “You still hear the idea that Portuguese colonialism was different, benevolent, gentle. The idea is still common, but it’s far from the reality” — Fernando Rosas, historian“There is a marginalization of blacks in Portugal … racism is deep-rooted, is systemic and it’s structural,” said Gomes Dias. “We have to admit that Portugal is as racist as other European countries.”She hopes the slavery monument will help combat racism today. There are signs of change: Justice Minister Francisca Van Dunem is the first black woman to hold Cabinet office; Black and Asian actors are showing up increasingly in telenovelas; the image of a tolerant colonial past has been challenged by high-profile media productions.Among them was series of documentaries presented by historian Fernando Rosas on the RTP2 TV network that highlighted historical horrors from a 16th century “breeding center” for slaves in rural Portugal to forced-labor regimes that continued in Angolan diamond mines and cocoa plantations on São Tomé long after slavery was officially abolished.“All forms of colonialism were like that; the difference is that in Portugal it’s not talked about. It’s like it never happened,” Rosas said in an interview. “From people in authority and from the man in the street, you still hear the idea that Portuguese colonialism was different, benevolent, gentle. The idea is still common, but it’s far from the reality.”Rosas was a founder of the Left Bloc, a radical party that is the most vocal political force in highlighting racial issues. The party stands accused, however, of not practicing what it preaches. Like other left-of-center parties, it has no black lawmakers. Supporters of that line have accused the far left of exaggerating problems of racism to push a U.S.-style political correctness inappropriate in a Portuguese context.Women perform during celebrations for the Black Awareness Day in Rio de Janeiro | Leo Correa/AFP via Getty ImagesAs an example, they point to accusations of racism hurled at former center-right leader Pedro Passos Coelho after he criticized recent legislation introduced by the Socialist government to liberalize immigration. Although Passos Coelho’s wife is black, official statistics suggest most migrants heading to Portugal are not.Among the almost 47,000 new arrivals registered by the immigration service in 2016, over 21,000 came from elsewhere in the EU, led by French, Italians and Brits. Brazilians were the largest single nationality with 7,000. Just over 6,100 immigrants came from sub-Saharan Africa.Among foreigners already living in the country there are 88,000 Africans, mostly from Cape Verde and Angola.They are almost certainly outnumbered by Portuguese citizens of African descent, although the numbers are unknown since the country keeps no statistics based on race or ethnicity. Informal estimates suggest black people make up around 12 percent of those living and working in central Lisbon, with another 6 percent or so of Asian descent.The rosy picture of racial integration has been clouded by studies suggesting discrimination in areas ranging from education to housing, employment to the justice system. Campaigners lament a shortage of black faces in politics, business and the media. Portugal’s “heroes of the sea” are celebrated in the opening words of the national anthem. A navigational sphere decorates the flag. Statues of brawny seafarers dot the landscape. A statue of Prince Henry the Navigator, who instigated the discovery program, sits by the site of that first slave market in Lagos. A small museum also opened there in 2016.Portugal’s African empire was Europe’s longest. It limped on until the mid-1970s, when junior army officers, sickened by colonial war, toppled the ruling dictatorship, opening the way for democracy at home and independence for the “overseas territories.”Country of toleranceFew Portuguese miss their imperial regime. Four decades on, no political force clings to colonial nostalgia. Yet a belief lingers that Portuguese colonialism was gentler than other European empires, marked by a tolerant interaction with other peoples and widespread racial mixing.That tolerance, the narrative goes, is reflected in today’s Portugal.Unlike just about everywhere else in Europe, there’s no significant far-right party spouting xenophobic populism; during Europe’s refugee crisis, a parliamentary consensus backed doubling the country’s refugee quota; in 2015, Portugal quietly voted in António Costa, whose father was Indian, as prime minister.“Anyone who knows anything about Europe has to agree that Portugal is probably … the least racist country in Europe,” Renato Epifânio, president of the International Lusophone Movement, which promotes cultural ties between Portuguese-speaking countries, wrote in the daily Público. “This can, and should, be one of our greatest causes of pride.” Lone voiceThe sole black member in the 230-seat parliament is Hélder Amaral, of the conservative CDS–People’s Party.“In a country that has 500 years of links to Africa, there is just one black lawmaker,” Amaral said. “That’s odd, given that this is a country that likes to boast about being inter-racial and very open to relations with other peoples.”Amaral agrees that there’s less overt racism in Portugal than many places, but says not enough is done to promote integration and opportunity.“There are countries where the expression of racism and xenophobia is worse, but they have more capacity to integrate their communities,” he said. “We have a serious problem of inequality of opportunity, we have a serious problem with a society that is not fair in the treatment of its minorities.”The excavation site of the biggest slave cemetery ever found in the Americas, at the New Blacks Memory and Research Institute (IPN) museum in Rio de Janeiro | Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty ImagesHe welcomes the debate over the slavery memorial.“Portugal is a fantastic country full of good things, but it has its faults and one of them is difficulty handling the bad periods in its history,” Amaral said. “The monument could be a step in the right direction.” However, he warns against turning the memorial into “an ideological statement” that exacerbates divisions.“I don’t want us to head towards a settling of scores with ourselves. I want people to understand what happened and why it happened and I want people to see this is the time to ensure that everybody has equal opportunities,” Amaral said. “This is not the moment to judge history, it’s the moment to understand history.” Also On POLITICO European schools grapple with Black Pete By Esther King Racism charges swarm Trump as ‘shithole’ debate rattles immigration talks By Matthew Nussbaumlast_img read more

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After the UN declaration on AMR, what comes next?

first_imgWith last week’s approval of a United Nations (UN) declaration on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), world leaders have made a commitment to fight the rise of drug-resistant pathogens and ensure continued access to life-saving antibiotics. Now comes the hard part: Turning the commitment into action.Advancements will take place on the national level, with governments creating plans to monitor antibiotic resistant infections, reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics in human and animal health and agriculture, and educate the public about antibiotic stewardship. Some countries have already started down this path. But for others, especially low-income nations with weak healthcare systems and a host of other health challenges, the task will be more difficult.”It’s very hard to deny medicines to people who are sick,” said Laura Kahn, MD, MPH, a physician and research scholar at Princeton University and author of the book One Health and the Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance. As Kahn explains, many developing nations use antibiotics as a substitute for sanitation, hygiene, and medical care. Asking them to reduce antibiotic use essentially removes a critical tool from their healthcare arsenal.This is where organizations like the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) will play a significant role. But how these UN bodies will ensure every country is holding up its end of the bargain remains an open question.The challenge of implementation”Implementing this will not be easy, at all,” said Gian Luca Burci, JD, former legal counsel for the WHO. The UN declaration calls for the creation of a body that will coordinate the efforts of the WHO, FAO, and OIE. But coordination will be a challenge, Burci explained, because those organizations represent different constituencies with different priorities.  The organization that is in the best position to take the lead, Burci said, is the WHO. The agency’s AMR action plan, put forward in 2015, forms the blueprint of the UN declaration. The plan calls for nations to improve public awareness and understanding of AMR, increase surveillance for drug-resistant organisms, reduce the incidence of infection through improved sanitation and hygiene, promote antimicrobial stewardship in human and animal health, and increase investment in new antibiotics, diagnostics, and vaccines.In Burci’s view, implementation of the plan could follow two paths. The WHO could work with experts to create detailed national action plans that include targets and goals for reduced antibiotic use. Or member states could take the lead and come up with “soft” targets that are more politically viable. Given how many sectors will be affected by targets, in particular the agricultural sector, Burci said this might be the likelier path.”I wouldn’t be surprised if you see member states try to take the lead, or at least be part of the follow-up process,” he said.One of the fears, though, is that some countries might come up with soft targets and then fail to meet their commitments, leaving other countries to shoulder the burden. Big food-producing nations like Argentina and Brazil, for example, could have a lot to lose from phasing out the use of antibiotics in livestock. “The issue is a level playing field,” Burci said. “There is a fear of free-riding.”Political pressureThis is where the UN plays an important role. By acknowledging the grave and urgent threat posed by AMR and committing countries to take action, the UN declaration adds a level of political pressure that can force nations to make AMR a priority and facilitate policy coherence.Any movement on AMR, though, could be hampered by transitions going on at the UN and the WHO, where leadership changes will occur in the coming months. “I think a lot really depends on who the next UN secretary-general is and who the next director-general of the WHO is,” notes Ramanan Laxminarayan, PhD, MPH, director of the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy (CDDEP). “They’ve got many other priorities, but will they recognize that this is a really important issue they should not put on the back burner?”Laxminarayan is hoping that the UN reaches to other parties to help fight AMR. “This problem can be solved only partially by UN agencies and their ways of working,” he said. “Unless they reach out to the broad set of academics, clinicians, veterinarians…that lie outside of governments, it will not get solved.”That’s because reducing drug-resistant infections and antibiotic use is not as straightforward as fixing the hole in the ozone, Laxminarayan explained. That effort required governments to change regulatory standards and companies to meet those standards. AMR, on the other hand, requires a broader set of stakeholders.Holding the UN accountableLaxminarayan is among those who think targets for reducing inappropriate antibiotic use are a critical element in the battle against AMR. These types of targets, he argues, will enable the UN to measure progress.If the UN effort against AMR lags, Laxminarayan said he and others will be there to “hold their feet to the fire.” To that end, CDDEP has joined with other public health and infectious disease groups to form CARA, the Conscience of Antimicrobial Resistance Action. CARA envisions its role as something of a watchdog that will hold the UN—along with international health agencies and member states—accountable for meeting its commitment to fight AMR. Among the tasks of the organization will be to monitor progress toward agreed-upon goals, and independently establish a set of targets that countries should aim to meet.”It is not enough for countries, politicians, businesses and the healthcare community to make pledges for change,” Laxminarayan and Dilip Nathwani, OBE, of the British Society of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy wrote recently in New Scientist. “They must know that they’re being watched, but also that our community of experts stands ready to help.”See also:Sep 21 UN draft political declaration on AMRSep 21 CIDRAP News story “UN leaders pledge to fight antimicrobial resistance”May 2015 WHO Global Action Plan on AMRSep 20 CARA press releaseSep 22 New Scientist commentary (free registration required)last_img read more

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Dominicans urged to ‘participate fully’ in Independence celebrations

first_img Share Chief Cultural Officer, Raymond LawrenceDominica’s chief cultural officer has issued a call to citizens to participate fully in this year’s Independence celebrations.On 3 November 1978, Dominica became an independent nation. This year will therefore mark thirty-five years since Dominica obtained independence from the British Empire.This year’s celebration which spans over six weeks will be observed under the theme, “One Mission, One Dominica, Celebrating 35”.“Independence as we all know is a wonderful time for nation-building, building identity, building pride in self, pride in country,” Raymond Lawrence said on Friday, 16th August.“We’re encouraging you, everybody here to participate fully in this year’s independence celebrations,” Mr Lawrence said in his address at the closing ceremony of a Summer Arts Program at the Old Mill Cultural Center in Canefield. “It’s a special anniversary, the thirty-fifth anniversary of Dominica’s independence so we’re really appealing to the entire public to come out and participate fully in the celebrations this year,” he stated further.The Cultural Division, which spear-heads activities to commemorate Independence celebrations, is expected to launch the calendar of activities next month.Dominica Vibes News Share Tweet Sharecenter_img 18 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! LocalNews Dominicans urged to ‘participate fully’ in Independence celebrations by: – August 16, 2013last_img read more

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Season championships are Sunday at Benton County

first_imgVINTON, Iowa ­– The 2015 campaign comes to a close this Sunday, Sept. 20 with season championship night at Benton County Speedway.Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modifieds, IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars, Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods and IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks are on the Iowa’s Bravest Salute to Soldiers program at Vinton, along with BCS micro modifieds.Pit gates open at 4 p.m. and racing follows 6 p.m. hot laps.Rain date for the season championship show is Sunday, Sept. 27.last_img

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