June 14, 2019 Weekly Roundup of Web Design and Development News

first_imgAccessibilityIn this week’s post in the #TakeFiveWith series, Zeineb interviews digital accessibility specialist and London Accessibility leader Andy Ronksley, who discusses his work, what motivates him, and plans for the future.Filling out an online form should be straightforward. Cues for what is needed and what format should be clearly evident, as Raghavendra Peri describes in the anatomy of accessible forms: required form fields.If you missed it, London Accessibility published the livestream of this month’s meetup featuring Gian Wild on the accessibility of social media and Robin Spinks on the augmented reality tool EYEWARE. In this week’s web design and development news roundup, you’ll learn what to do when asked for your UX salary expectations in an interview, find a call for speakers for an inclusive design conference, discover a list of Gutenberg blocks for your WordPress site, and more. If you’re new to my blog, each Friday I publish a post highlighting my favorite user experience, accessibility, WordPress, CSS, and HTML posts I’ve read in the past week.Hope you find the resources helpful in your work or projects!Want more resources like these on a daily basis? Follow me @redcrew on Twitter.Tweet of the WeekHaving a clear process that everyone respects is how we get things done as fast as possible. We aren’t spending a lot of time or energy on debating how to go about the process. We just get on with it. It helps us when we disagree. It helps us when we are stuck.— Jen Simmons (@jensimmons) June 13, 2019User ExperienceOver the years, I’ve read dozens of articles about the difference between customer experience and user experience. I like Kim Flaherty’s explanation in their Nielsen Norman group article,Whether you use the term “UX” or “CX” is not important, because they basically mean the same thing if you have the “correct” interpretation of the termsExcellent tips and advice from Joe Natoli on what to do when you’re asked for your UX salary expectations during an interview.It’s been a while since I shared a UX win, where I highlight an organization that does something that shows they’ve kept the customer/user top of mind. This week I give a shoutout to Olga’s Kitchen and their feedback survey. It’s the tagging system fans use that keeps the almost 5 million fanworks of Archive of Our Own organized and running smoothly. As J.J. Garrett tweeted, Wired did a great job highlighting the successful information architecture project. Unfortunately, Wired didn’t mention the information architecture field.The good news is that Wired published a whole story profiling a successful work of information architecture.The bad news is that it does not in any way acknowledge the existence of the field. https://t.co/KzykOz4o3P— Jesse James Garrett (@jjg) June 13, 2019center_img Have you submitted your presentation? Call for speakers is open for the free Inclusive Design 24 conference on October 10, 2019. Submissions are due July 14, 2019.WordPressDid you know WordPress has a 60.8% market share in the CMS market? And that it powers powers 14.7% of the world’s top websites? Find out more fascinating and interesting facts about WordPress in this post by Maddy Osman. Oops! WordPress VIP outage caused sites to display a potted succulent, when the sites reverted to the default Twenty Seventeen theme temporarily. Excellent resource for everyone interested in learning about Gutenberg blocks, my friend Claire Brotherton has compiled a full list of WordPress blocks and how you can add more. Definitely a post worth bookmarking! Shoutout to Jason Stallings and my friend Chris Wiegman for the beta release of the WP Engine DevKit, a local development environment Chris has been working on since starting at WP Engine in 2018. CSS and HTMLIs it time to leave it behind? Do you see the CSS background-image property as an anti-pattern, as Andrew Welch argues? If you’re not careful, the properties you set with flexbox and grid can impact the visual order of content, putting it at odds with the DOM order for content. Which affects content re-ordering and accessibility. Agreed. There should be a proces.I believe new HTML elements should go through a standards process, be debated by multiple parties (not one), be useful to most websites (pave the cowpaths), and be written in language that makes sense for HTML, especially for folks who don’t speak English well. So no on this. https://t.co/FzlgwLV770— Jen Simmons (@jensimmons) June 13, 2019What do you think are the reasons why most developers fear CSS? Is it trying to understand the cascade, specificity, or past experiences with poor communication with designers? What I Found InterestingSomething special you can do for an upcoming family celebration: record yourself reading your kid’s favorite books. Or have friends or family members record themselves reading a favorite book. Hearing their voice reading a story always brings smiles. Giving a presentation soon? Check out these 6 do’s and don’ts to take your slides to the next level, courtesy of TED. One of my favorite tips: include a blank slide to provide a pause. But don’t use a white blank slide (people will think something is broken).Do you use Google Photos? Google announced that they’re changing how Google Photos and Google Drive work together. Or don’t. If you like what you’ve read today, share the post with your colleagues and friends.Want to make sure you don’t miss out on updates? Subscribe to get notified when new posts are published.Did I miss some resources you found this week? I’d love to see them! Post them in the comments below.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedWeekly Roundup of Web Design and Development News: June 2, 2017In this week’s web design and development resources roundup, you’ll learn how to make accessibility a core design principle, find a UX event calendar for southeast Michigan, discover how to get started with CSS Grid Layout today, and more. If you’re new to my blog, each Friday I publish a…In “Web design & development links”September 20, 2019: My Weekly Roundup of Web Design and Development NewsIn this week’s web design and development news roundup, you’ll learn where to place buttons on forms, discover how to get buy-in for accessibility at your organization, discover a cool washing machine created with CSS, and more. If you’re new to my blog, each Friday I publish a post highlighting…In “Web design & development links”November 8, 2019: My Weekly Roundup of Web Design and Development NewsIn this week’s web design and development news roundup, you’ll learn how to create online experiences that work well for older people, find a recap of the annual WordPress State of the Word, discover new underline CSS properties, and more. If you’re new to my blog, each Friday I publish…In “Web design & development links”last_img read more

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SaaS: Microsoft Shoots for the Clouds

first_imgFirst there were the desktop wars. Then the browser wars. Now Microsoft is challenging players like Amazon, Google, and smaller companies like Zoho for dominance in the Cloud. When the browser wars started, Bill Gates made a dramatic change in Microsoft’s business direction to pursue a new course. It’s clear that Microsoft is at the crossroads again and Steve Ballmer and Ray Ozzie are now struggling to chart out new territory for Microsoft.Microsoft’s On-Demand push since January include subscription versions of Microsoft Exchange and SharePoint which are expected to become available in late 2008.It’s been a little slow in coming, but Microsoft announced at the Mix08 Web developer conference an in-the-cloud data service called SQL Server Data Services (SSDS). The On-Demand service will be based on the popular Microsoft SQL Server technology. The new service is aimed at Web developers who don’t want to deal with the hassle of managing a database. Microsoft describes SSDS as “highly scalable, on-demand data storage and query processing utility services.” The focus is mostly on startups and small to medium sized companies. The interface to the database is via REST or SOAP web services.It’s interesting to note though that this isn’t at all a drop-in replacement of a SQL database. SSDS uses a new language called LINQ. SQL will return rows from tables of elements, LINQ (Language Integrated Query). The idea is that LINQ could support a wider variety of datatypes than what are in SQL. Search and query operators are standard programming language operators in LINQ. Equally interesting is that LINQ is not a language in itself, it is a language extension to .NET language supported by Microsoft’s CLR, like C# and Visual Basic.The bad news is that the program is only in beta and not expected to be non-beta until mid next year. But then Microsoft’s competitors, Google and Amazon, seem to be in perpetual beta with their services. Also the features of SSDS are a subset of the features available in SQL Server, and even a full-featured SQL Server lags behind the features of Oracle or DB2.With SDSS Microsoft competes against other in-the-cloud Databases that include DabbleDB, Amazon, CouchDB, GoogleBase, Zoho Creator and TrackVia.Currently SSDS is most similar to what Amazon is doing with their SimpleDB package. In some ways, Microsoft is ahead of the pack, at least ahead of traditionaldatabase vendors in starting an On-Demand presence, namely Oracle and IBM. Seems like another technology war is in the brewing.last_img read more

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