Kim Faces Battle to Get to Xi’s Side

first_img By Kim So Yeol – 2013.08.14 1:35pm Kim Faces Battle to Get to Xi’s Side Analysis & Opinion RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Twitter Tracking the “unidentified yellow substance” being dried out near the Yongbyon Nuclear Center Analysis & Opinion Is Nuclear Peace with North Korea Possible? center_img Pence Cartoon: “KOR-US Karaoke” AvatarKim So Yeol Analysis & Opinion There have been rumors of Kim Jong Eun visiting China ever since he came to power. However, North Korea’s addiction to making trouble in Northeast Asia has led China to reject North Korean advances on more than one occasion. Nevertheless, North Korea is certain to keep knocking on the door of Beijing, since such a visit is important to the cohesion of the ruling consensus in Pyongyang. If Kim Jong Eun does not travel to China this year, he will risk losing the confidence of his supporters. Currently Kim is not being treated as a leader by North Korea’s biggest ally. He is also in need of greater economic support.Yet the two sides’ relations have worsened since President Xi Jinping came to power in Beijing because of Kim’s need to show off his possession of nuclear weapons. In May, Xi pressured North Korea by telling Choi Ryong Hae, who had travelled to China as an envoy from Kim, that no matter how the situation may change, denuclearization should be pursued.Xinhuna News Agency recently reported that when Vice President Li Yuanchao visited North Korea in late July, he also passed on a message to Kim Jong Eun, namely that “China wants to realize denuclearization, peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula, and solve problems through dialogue and compromise.” It is also said that Kim Jong Eun visited Vice President Li himself during the latter’s visit, in order to express his desire to visit China. However, Vice President Li rejected his overtures, telling him that it would do no good to visiting Beijing at the current time, and that Xi and other top leaders would be unable to meet him.On this, Park Hyung Jung, a senior researcher with the Korea Institute for National Uniffication, told Daily NK, “The key factor in the North Korea-China relationship is whether North Korea is on the way to denuclearization. China wants to hold the Six-Party Talks, but North Korea wants to enter into dialogue as an established nuclear power.” “China is unlikely to accept Kim Jong Eun’s visit until North Korea changes its attitude,” he predicted, going on, “I predict that North Korea will try various conciliatory proposals with South Korea and the United States during the second half of the year. That way they can tell China that their efforts have been in vain because of the stiff attitude of the United States and South Korea.” SHARE Analysis & Opinion last_img read more

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Ashton Gate add new food and beverage matchday concessions

first_imgThe external matchday Fan Village will be in operation from 3pm and the enhanced offerings sees a new addition of Spanish cuisine from Los Hermanos, as well as a new bar, Boots and Balls – fitted with a state-of-the-art speed pour system with drinks concessions offering a fully cashless option. We have kept fan favourites Fish & Chips and the Burger food outlet as well as the live bands on stage. Inside the Ashton Gate Stadium concourses, from when the turnstiles open at 6pm, local business The Jolly Hog has opened a concession, a new Mexican kiosk has also opened whilst Chicago Town Pizza slices are being served throughout the Lansdown concourse. All pints are down to £4 between 6.15pm-6.45pm with season card holders getting a further discount of £3.60.In the Dolman concourse we see the return of the Ashton Gate Curry Bar, which offers supporters the finest quality curries, with fresh ingredients offering a new curry each matchday packed full of flavour and served with rice, while vegetarian and vegan options are also available. Working with Holy Cow curry sauces who have won numerous awards from ‘The Great Taste Awards’ in 2006, The Grocer Magazine’s ‘Best New Product Award’ in 2014 and 2015 and The Caterer’s ‘Product Excellence Award’ in December 2016, and some more Great Taste Awards in 2017, we are sure these will be a match winner with our supporters.We also celebrate the return of the ‘pie of the month’ – with a new pie added each month from our local hand-made pies and pasties company Chunk – as well as vegan pies.Our Coffee Shop, with locally sourced fresh food and drink, is open at 9am for you to grab a slice of cake and hot drink ahead of the big game.last_img read more

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Premier League stars banned from spitting and ordered to wear snoods or masks as full list of training rules revealed

first_img People Slammed By Massive Waves 4 DayZ Amazing Mods ~ More Cars, More Guns, More Gore! Animals are so funny that you can die of laughter Rebekah Vardy scores an impressive penalty in six-inch heels 10 INCREDIBLE Space Launch Failures! Travel Diary // Vietnam 2017center_img Source: Soccer – thesun.co.uk Funny animals make you happy and laugh funny animal compilation Real or Fake? Shark Attacks Helicopter PREMIER LEAGUE players have been ordered not to spit when they go back to training.And in a lengthy dossier sent out from clubs they have also been given minute-by-minute instructions of how to train when they go back to work.Premier League stars have been banned from spitting and ordered to wear snoods in trainingThat even means they have to park THREE spaces away from each other at their HQs when they come in from home.⚠️ Read our coronavirus in sport live blog for the latest news & updatesThe lengthy and detailed programmes reveal that ALL players will have to sign a special form before they first return.And when the players arrive – on their own – for training they have had their day charted out for them by video calls in advance.The directive from the Premier League clubs is: “Players essentially will be required to eat at home before training, turn up with kit, boots and water or drinks bottle.“Do your allocated training session and leave immediately.“Social distancing restrictions will limit the free availability of the gym and treatment areas.“A booking system may need to be in place to ensure that each is able to access the disinfected equipment they require.“Medical treatments will be for essential therapies only and need to be agreed and schedule in advance.“Please expect to have to do some therapies at home with the guidance of the medical staff.“No player can us an ice bath, cryogenic chamber or similar at the training ground.“Players are encouraged to wear a snood or mask at all times while at the training ground given that the measures reduce hard-mouth contact and the risk of viral transmission.“No player or member of staff is permitted access to the dressing room, save to use the toilet and or hand basin.“No shaving or showering or further use of the premises is permitted. “No player is permitted to store any personal items or technical equipment save for football boots.“There is no congregation in communal areas at the training ground.”On the subject of testing the memo confirmed our story that TWO antigen tests a week will be carried out and regular temperature checks.The Premier League aim is to start on June 12, as SunSport exclusively revealed on Saturday.And the top flight is reportedly  working on a seven week festival of football if the season resumes – but it must start by June 19 – allowing a week if complications arise.Give now to The Sun’s NHS appealBRITAIN’s four million NHS staff are on the frontline in the battle against coronavirus.But while they are helping save lives, who is there to help them?The Sun has launched an appeal to raise £1MILLION for NHS workers.The Who Cares Wins Appeal aims to get vital support to staff in their hour of need.We have teamed up with NHS Charities Together in their urgent Covid-19 Appeal to ensure the money gets to exactly who needs it.The Sun is donating £50,000 and we would like YOU to help us raise a million pounds, to help THEM.No matter how little you can spare, please donate today herewww.thesun.co.uk/whocareswinsappealMartin Keown questions whether players want Premier League to return after Sergio Agüero admits they are ‘scared for their families’ last_img read more

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NFL free agency rumors: Former Cowboys WR Dez Bryant to meet with Saints

first_imgDez Bryant could be moving closer to an NFL return.The 30-year-old wide receiver is set to visit with the Saints on Tuesday, according to a report from the NFL Network, which cites unidentified league sources. New Orleans will also work out veteran wideout Brandon Marshall and Kamar Aiken with Bryant, according to the report.   The #Saints are bringing in 3 wide receivers tomorrow to workout for the team among them Dez Bryant per sources informed.— Jane Slater (@SlaterNFL) November 6, 2018Bryant has been out of the league since he was cut by the Cowboys in mid-April. He has previously met with the Browns and Ravens, but did not end up signing a contract with either team.His visit with the Browns was shown on HBO’s “Hard Knocks” in late August. Related News A.J. Green injury update: Bengals WR reportedly expected to miss at least 2 games, won’t need surgery #HardKnocks takes us inside the meeting between @DezBryant and @Browns HC Hue Jackson.Hard Knocks re-airs Wednesday (11:30pm ET/PT) on @HBO. pic.twitter.com/zIA58uXd7g— NFL (@NFL) August 22, 2018Bryant was selected to the Pro Bowl three times during his eight seasons with Dallas and led the NFL with 16 receiving touchdowns in 2014. Last season, Bryant had 838 receiving yards and six touchdowns.The Saints will face the Bengals in Week 10 action Sunday.last_img read more

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Conversations: Play-by-Play with Bill Hillgrove

first_imgIn his 46th year, Bill Hillgrove is the “Voice of the Panthers.” (Courtesy Photo/University of Pittsburgh Athletics)You can walk around a city, a museum, an art gallery, a winery, or a nature preserve, and see it for yourself. But when guided, it takes on another dimension. You’ll see things that otherwise might elude you. Think of a sports broadcast play-by-play man as a tour guide. You’ll get the score (and the score), the scoop, the dope, the skinny…all the background info you need, not knowing you even need it. That’s the purpose of the play-by-play man (Sorry, I’m not aware of any play-by-play women).Unfortunately, if your tour guide comes across as annoying, ingratiating or effusive…and plenty do…it will taint your experience.  But, get a guy who is astute, congenial, and otherwise erudite, and has a great command of voice, delivery and language…then it’s quite entertaining.So let’s focus on those latter guys.After all, sports television is first and foremost, entertainment.  If you’re entertained, you watch.  If you watch, you buy what television and sports has to sell, which is mostly the stuff you crave… food, phones, beer, cars, investing, and sex (in all it’s obvious and subtle forms).Sportscasters shape our experience of the game whether we want them to or not. Then the color analyst touts his/her perspective, which enlightens us and has us digest the game differently.  He/she tells us what we saw and what we didn’t.  Did you actually see the Steelers’ left guard pulling or trapping?  Most likely not–until Phil Simms, Troy Aikman or Tunch Ilkin pointed it out.  Radio play-by-play men have an even larger canvas to paint, due to the sightless medium.Bill Hillgrove has been painting and guiding us through the Steelers’ radio broadcasts for 22 years, ever since Jack Fleming retired in 1994.  Fleming’s stint was 28 years with the Steelers, including calling the Immaculate Reception.  When Fleming “retired,” in the same manner that Steeler’s offensive coordinator Bruce Arians and defensive coordinator Dick Lebeau “retired,” Dan Rooney drafted Bill Hillgrove for the job.Hillgrove was broadcasting the University of Pittsburgh football and basketball Panthers (and still does), when invited to step into the Steeler’s broadcast booth to take over for Fleming, who was partnered for 24 years with free-lance journalist and sometimes TV sports anchor (and the most unlikely of TV personalities), Myron Cope.Cope himself was floored that anyone would want his crooked face, let alone his whiney, nasal voice on television.  But Cope had that weird and wacky magnetism about him.  He was a rascal and a bit of a tyrant, but also a well-respected writer for Sports Illustrated and other publications.  He also had heart.Cope spent 35 years broadcasting Steeler color with Fleming and Hillgrove, inventing the Terrible Towel in the process.   Some refer to Hillgrove and the late Cope as an institution.Hillgrove now works with former Steeler lineman Tunch Ilkin.Hillgrove has been a DJ on radio in the ‘60s, a sports anchor and booth announcer at Channel 4 (WTAE) in the ‘70s and ‘80s, and the main Steeler tour guide since the ‘90s.NFL football differs from other team sports.  It has no local TV broadcasting, which is handled by the networks.  Otherwise, Hillgrove might be on TV, I think.  I wondered what he would think of doing television.  I sat with him in Bella Luna Trattoria in Westmoreland County to ask him a few questions. It must be one of his favorite water stops…everyone seemed to know him.Me:  Would you like to do television?Bill Hillgrove:  No.Okel Dokel…as Myron might say to that.Despite Hillgrove’s long tenure on television as a sports anchor for WTAE, he has no desire to do television play-by-play.  Radio is his thing, and has been since he was 13.  “My first love has always been radio,” he tells me.His schedule is demanding, juggling three balls in the air as he puts it, with Panther football, Panther basketball and his Steeler broadcasts.  I wondered how he keeps it all straight. “I have great tunnel vison and am able to lock in,” he replies to the query.  “I have the ability to block out the elevator noise.”Over the years, Hillgrove has been influenced by some great broadcasters, like Fleming himself.  Ed Conway (the Penguins first broadcaster) from Channel 4 was a mentor as well. Hillgrove served as Conway’s assistant on Pitt basketball broadcasts.  And there was Ray Scott too, the legendary sportscaster mostly associated with the Green Bay Packers and the early Super Bowl broadcasts, whom Hillgrove met at Channel 4, when he was a part timer.  “I was an associate producer, station wagon driver, tour guide, switchboard operator…and I got to meet him (Scott) and we had some meaty conversations,” says Hillgrove. “He told me about the system I use today, with two spotters.  He was a very influential person in who I wanted to become.  He said 95% of your work is before you step into the booth.  Let the game come to you.  That’s golden advice.”After decades and decades in broadcasting, Bill Hillgrove’s passion has not waned.  “I think if it did, you would see it in my work,” he offers.  “The guy upstairs will decide when I retire.”
 Hillgrove alludes quite a bit to his holiness upstairs (no, it’s not Dan Rooney) while sharing with me his history and view of broadcast life.  He has an aunt that is a nun.  He started in radio at 13, doing radio dramas for the diocese, playing type, as a 13-year-old brat…just what the sisters were looking for.There is no typical work week for him. “The schedule dictates everything,” he concedes…yet there is some routine.  “On Mondays there is the Pitt news conference and Tuesdays it’s Mike Tomlin’s press conference.  Wednesdays it’s the Pat Narduzzi show for Pitt basketball and Thursday, it’s back to the Steelers,” he quips.When I asked him what his best asset was, he paused.  “I’ve never thought of it,” he said.  I offered up his voice.  “My voice is what God gave me. But my wife is a vocal teacher and we talk from time to time about giving support to the voice.  I’ve got to project and talk over the crowd, talking from the diaphragm and not from the throat, up here” (he signals to his neck).  “If you did, then you would sound like Myron,” said I.  He threw out a hearty laugh.  “Yeah,” he replied, “but he used it well.  He took what God gave him and made a living, as only he could.”Yoi!I probed some more.Me:  How hard is the travel on your family?BH:  The family lives in punt formation.  It’s not a problem.Punt formation…a great metaphor.  I continued.Me:  Do you ever feel pressure or overwhelmed?BH:  I don’t give those things time to set in.  I’m on deadlines and I’m always moving forward to the next deadline.  That has gotten me through. People expect you to be there when the game is on.Hillgrove wasn’t really looking for the play-by-play job.  “I was a friend of Jack Flemings and when he ‘retired,’ he wasn’t happy about it,” laments Hillgrove.  “They (the Steelers) gave him a nudge and I said I’m not going there. I have the TV thing.  And then, all of a sudden, I’m a candidate for a job I never sought.  Apparently, Dan Rooney called the Pitt chancellor and asked if he would mind sharing broadcasters.  With Myron in the booth, the play-by-play guy was only along for the ride.  He was Mr. Steeler broadcast.  It was his show.  He did it uniquely and very well.”Hillgrove then launches into his Cope imitation, which by the way, is pretty good.   Hillgrove had asked Cope why he brought in so many index cards on players and stats.  Hillgrove’s Cope says… “if the game becomes a clocker in the fourth quarter, we got to keep the listeners.”   Classic Cope.ME:  What is your most memorable game?BH:  For the Steelers?  Super Bowl 43 (Santonio Holmes’ winning TD catch in the corner of the end zone). That was pretty special.  In college, Tony Dorsett breaking Archie Griffin’s rushing record at Navy in October of ’76.  I started crying.  It was a once in a lifetime moment. He was the greatest college running back I ever saw.I asked him who were some of the best partners he has worked with.  Hillgrove worked with Johnny Sauer on Pitt football broadcasts.  Sauer was his color guy for 20 years.  “Johnny Sauer taught me more about football… he just knew the game,” says Hillgrove.  Sauer’s resume was impressive…player and coach at West Point, coaching the Florida Gators, Citadel Bulldogs and Los Angeles Rams, scouting for the Vikings, and doing color for the NFL on CBS.Me:  What athlete do you admire most?BH:  Terry Bradshaw, Andy Russell, Rocky Bleier, Tony Dorsett, Dan Marino, Hugh Green, Ricky Jackson, Bill Fralic.  And I like Bettis.Me:  Who should be in the hall of fame that is not?BH:  Elroy Face. He took relief pitching from this level (pointing down) to the level it is today.  If he had toiled in Chicago, LA, Boston or New York, he would have been in already.  Pittsburgh is considered an outpost.Me:  Who is the best player you ever covered?BH:  Joe Greene.  He was the lynch pin of the franchise and where it is today and what it’s expectations are.   He changed the culture of the Steelers.Me:  And the best coach?BH:  Chuck Noll, hands down.Hillgrove goes to the games as early as possible to prep for the day’s events after putting in about 12-15 hours of prep during the week.  For him, the game is a magic carpet and he just goes for the ride.  And when he’s not riding the carpet in the off-season, he spends his time with golf, his place in Conneaut, cleaning out his garage, and reading fiction and jazz bios.Cope retired (actually retired) in 2005 and died in 2008.  And what might Myron say to his friend, Bill Hillgrove, on the thought of  him slowing down?  Um huh!  Gorganzola!Lee Kann is a media producer and a writer. contact: [email protected]last_img read more

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Mourinho names Messi among the game’s greats… but forgets all about Ronaldo

first_imgJose Mourinho forgot about Cristiano Ronaldo when talking about the ‘stars’ of football capable of creating the game’s greatest moments.  Upd. at 22:40 Sport EN 06/04/2015 CEST The Chelsea manager was asked about the goal scored against his side by Stoke City’s Charlie Adam, which was from inside his own half. center_img “It was a fantastic goal,” Mourinho conceded. “A goal which any of the world’s best players would like to score. If you talk with Pele, [Diego] Maradona or [Lionel] Messi, or any of those top players, they would like to score that goal. “And not all of them have [scored a goal like that] in their careers, so in that way [Adam’s goal] is magnificent.”  It adds another chapter to the Ronaldo-Mourinho story. That the Portuguese coach didn’t mention his former player on the list with Messi, Maradona and Pele could be deemed as an intentional dig.  The relationship between the two deteriorated significantly in Mourinho’s final months as Real Madrid boss.last_img read more

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Mum shocked by brazen home invasion

first_imgBy Aneeka Simonis SITTING just outside her lounge room, a mum breaks down in tears as she tells of how…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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Castlegar’s Courson edges Kokanee Springs Petersen for Balfour Senior Men’s Open title

first_img  Flight winners included Petersen taking first flight. England and Bob Hale were tied for Low Net.   Bob Matthew won second flight with a score of 81. Barry Bernard and Dwayne Grieve finished one-two in Low Net with 67 and 69, respectively.   Don Howie won third flight with an 86 with Albert Volpatti topping Low Net with 69. He was one shot better than Hugh Blackstock.   Norm Cassels took fourth flight honours with an 88 while Ron Pederson and Merv Schmidt tied for Low Net at 67. Don Courson of Castlegar outlasted Crawford Bay’s Leif Petersen by two strokes to capture the 2011 Senior Men’s Open last month at the Balfour Golf and Country Club.  Courson finished the 18-hole tournament with a 3-over-par 75 to nip Petersen of Kokanee Springs.   Marc Cross of Birchbank won Low Net honours, edging Ken England and Bob Hale  by a pair of shots. Cross finished with a net 66. last_img read more

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Louis Bockner documents inaugural fight of Nelson Boxing Club’s Jacob Rudkoski

first_imgWhen asked about the violence aspect he shakes it off.”It’s a sport. We’re not here to kill each other. Tell me that a six minute boxing match this weekend is going to do more damage than my buddies partying tonight.”In the bathroom of the restaurant I ask Rudkoski how he’s feeling, curious if his calm demeanor is hiding a nest of butterflies. After all, it is his first fight.”I feel good,” he says. “I’ve definitely got a bit of the nervous feeling but that’s just because I’m competitive. I get nervous before a chess match. It’s good. It keeps you sharp.”Rudkoski prepares to enter the ring        The second annual Cranbrook Eagles Boxing Club’s Charity Challenge is held in, where else, the Eagles Hall — a legion-like room filled with enough chairs and banquet tables to seat over 200 people.At one end volunteers are putting the finishing touches on the raised ring while at the other a stuffed Golden Eagle in a glass case presides over the action. Near the taxidermy watcher Rudkoski sits as Pineiro wraps his hands.The wrap is done in silent ceremony. A curt nod of approval from Rudkoski is all that is given after the completion of each fist followed by a mock hit into his palm. Satisfied coach and fighter rise along with the anticipation.Now people are filing in. Now the bell rings. Now the fights begin. The “thwack, thwack” of gloves on flesh is mirrored by fighters warming up in corners and alcoves around the room hitting pads with coaches.There is no animosity here. No intimidation or verbal aggression. Only a sense of a show, in this case put on to raise money for families in need. At the first Charity Challenge they had hoped to raise $5,000. Instead they raised $20,000.Fighters dressed in blue and red move through the crowd either in anxious, pre-fight wanderings or in post-fight glory. Even the defeated seem content, showing little signs of disappointment. After every battle there is a hug of recognition.”Respect is given all around,” Bockner tells me,” because everyone knows how hard it is.”Rudkoski is scheduled to fight tenth. His opponent, a tall, broad-shouldered man named Tyler Crew from the Southpaw Boxing Gym in Calgary, is dressed in blue trunks and sports a Mohawk.Somewhere between the seventh and eighth fight they disappear to the basement to warm up. Pads are pummeled as the final words of advice are given.”Be fast, be relaxed,” Pineiro tells him. “Basic stuff. It’s gonna be good.”Seventy-five seconds later the boxing match is over As the bell rings, Rudkoski moves almost gracefully from the red corner. The pace is different than most of the previous fights. There is no rush. They both seem to say, there is time. And then the blows begin to land.A gasp escapes from the crowd as Rudkoski lands a bone crushing shot on Crew’s shoulder, missing his head by inches. The next one finds its mark, Crew’s head snapping back as he stumbles into the corner. Rudkoski hesitates and in that moment the referee steps in, ushering Crew to the corner as blood streams down the left side of his face.The doctor is summoned and after two white medical pads are turned crimson he shakes his head. Seventy-five seconds after the opening bell the fight is stopped due to a technical knock out by injury. Rudkoski looks almost disappointed. The bubble of anticipation has burst and his record is officially 1-0.Great first fight, but now it’s time to train for the next oneOutside the car rain hammers down with tropical intensity, inside the victorious fighter once again appears calm.”It’s funny,” he says, “you do all that paperwork, you train for months and drive all that way and then it’s over in 75 seconds.”          As with most things in life, there is an ebb and flow to boxing. Moments of intense, adrenaline-fueled action are interspersed among long periods of training, waiting and anticipating.Unlike other sports there is no season or pre-season. There are no playoffs and no World Series. There is only the fight. And again, like life, it is often over before you fully realized it had begun.”Great job and have a good weekend,” Pineiro says as Rudkoski goes his separate way, “I’ll see you Monday.”A days rest is all he will get before the work begins anew. There will be no coddling or ego stroking, no time off to relish his achievement and none is expected.With the next fight already on the horizon the coach will ask for everything the fighter has and the fighter will oblige. By Louis BocknerMore than 200 people recently flocked to the Eagles Hall in Cranbrook to take in the second annual Eagles Boxing Club’s Charity Challenge.Nelson boxer Jacob Rudkoski was one of the fighters on the card, jumping into the ring for the first time.Louis Bockner was one of the 200 fight fans watching with anticipation as Rudkoski realizes his dream to box in a sanctioned event and writes this account of the Nelson Boxing Club inaugural taste of the sport.My first memories of Jacob Rudkoski are found on baseball diamonds and are preferable to the ones that came after on football fields. I consider myself lucky to have escaped the meetings of our rival high schools unscathed and now, after watching his performance as a boxer, I am forever indebted to John “Jack” Broughton who, in 1743, created weight divisions, ensuring Rudkoski and I will never be re-united in the ring.Rudkoski joined coach Jesse Pineiro and assistant coach Peter Bockner at the Nelson Boxing Club in May after several years of training as a Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fighter, a move instigated by a desire to refine his skills.Unlike MMA, which combines multiple fighting disciplines, he feels boxing allows him to focus on one aspect while leaving the kickboxing, wrestling jiu jitsu and muay thai in their respective fields. Now, six months later, we’re somewhere between Yahk and Cranbrook on our way to his first fight.The talk in the car centers on boxing — this fighter versus that fighter, the match ahead and the training behind. As the Nelson club’s only heavyweight he rarely finds anyone on par to spar with, a fact he believes has made him a better fighter.”Even training in MMA I rarely met guys my size,” he says. “It makes you work on speed, it makes you faster.”The Weigh InIn the basement banquet room of Cranbrook’s Sandman Hotel he strips to his underwear for the weigh in. Tipping the scale to a modest 102.1 kilograms he carries his weight lightly on legs like telephone poles. Even his head is big with a heavy-set brow and his hands resemble toaster ovens.As the room fills with people — fighters, coaches, mothers, fathers and more — glances dart around the room, hoping to discern prospective opponents. All Pineiro or Rudkoski know about his man is that he’s from Calgary and is about 100 kilograms.This narrows the field considerably as most of the fighters sitting in the lineup to see the doctor are in their teens or younger; a sign that boxing is still alive in Canada despite competition from the ever popular Ultimate Fighting Championship and major sports like soccer and hockey.  Some are lanky, some are round, some are silent, some are laughing and some look simply scared.As the doctor shines his flashlight in the pupils of a young man with a “Lethbridge Boxing Club” T-shirt the voice of Bill Watson, one of the Cranbrook Eagles Boxing Club coaches, cuts through the murmurs.”Can I have everyone’s attention?” he asks. “If you’re fighting in the blue corner you get changed and ready in the basement. If you’re in the red corner there’s a cube truck in the parking lot.”Cornerman and Trainer, Jesse Pineiro ‘At dinner the advice from coach to fighter begins to flow.”What I really want you to do is keep your hands up and finish with the left,” Pineiro says. “Do it religiously. That left brings you back defensively.”Use your punches. Nice and long and remember, keep your left up.”Although Pineiro’s amateur career record (10-5) is “kind of underwhelming” he carries with him a wealth of knowledge acquired through sparring with, and learning from, world-class fighters and coaches all over the world.In the early 2000’s he brought that knowledge back to his hometown of Nelson —  a city whose once vibrant boxing community was all but extinct.”In Nelson we’re building it from nothing,” Pineiro says. “[People] have no idea about boxing and they have little interest.”A point he and fighters like Rudkoski are hoping to change.”It’s a good thing to get into,” says Rudkoski. “It’s character building.”last_img read more

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Nelson U18 Selects settle for Silver at Provincial B Girls Cup

first_imgThe Nelson Selects ran out of offence, dropping at 2-0 decision to Chilliwack Attack in the Gold Medal Match of the BC Soccer U18 Girl’s Provincial B Cup Sunday in Penticton.The loss gave Nelson the Silver Medal.In 2014, the same group of players won the Bronze Medal as Nelson defeated the same Chilliwack Attack 6-1.Nelson, which advanced to the final on a goal average after finishing in a tie with Williams Lake in division standings, saw the offence dry up in the Gold Medal Match.The Selects opened the tournament by blasting Kootenay rival Columbia Valley Titans 4-1. Striker Naomi Perkins scored three times to lead the Selects with Jena Wheeldon adding a single.Nelson then played to a scoreless tie against Williams Lake.In the final contest of the round robin Saturday, Perkins scored twice to power Nelson past Powell River Edge 2-0.Nelson doubled by host PinnaclesNelson Selects lost 4-2 to host Penticton Pinnacles in consolation round action at the BC Soccer U16 Girl’s Provincial B Cup Sunday in Penticton.Nelson finished the tournament in sixth place.The Selects opened the Provincial B Cup with a 1-0 win over Burnaby Girl’s SC Intensity.Nelson was pounded 5-1 by Kelowna before losing 2-1 to Juan de Fuca. The loss knocked the Selects out of the medal round as Juan de Fuca secured second spot in the division with four points, one more than Nelson.last_img read more

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