Vendors protest removal from Stabroek Market Square

first_imgA group of angry vendors, who were removed from the Stabroek Market Square, where they ply their tradeVenders protesting outside City Hall on Fridayon a daily basis, staged a protest outside Ministry of the Presidency before marching down to City Hall on Friday.The Mayor and City Council is removing them temporarily to the vacant lot south of Parliament Buildings so that the market square can be cleaned. However, vendors feel that this move is “unfair” and “disrespectful”.At the protest, vendor Arrisa Richmond told Guyana Times that she was not at the meeting when the agreement was made and noted that the area where City Council wants to send them is “not prosperous.” The single-parent of three also stated that she intends to return to vend at Stabroek despite the four-month removal which City Council has imposed.“They seh come Sunday fuh clean [and] I coming an give dem a hand fuh clean… but I will be going back there to vend on Tuesday right on because they seh they want de place look nice for Jubilee; I want piece ah de Jubilee money, too,” Richmond stressed.Other vendors vowed they will not be taken for granted and some noted they would not go anywhere.“I am not moving from there, I am selling out here 22 years… Jagdeo used to call we in and talk to us whether he like we or not. Jagdeo used to deal with we and is he put we there; we vote for a change and this is what we get?” questioned a vendor in anger.She stated, “No vending, no Jubilee”, and noted that vendors intend to continue their protest actions.“We is de government backbone, we put everybody weh they deh right now, and we deserve better treatment than this,” a male vendor expressed.After locking the gates, City Council tried to ease the tensions when Deputy Mayor Sherrod Duncan came out to speak with the vendors.“We’re all very concerned about the vendors there. We all want you folks to earn a good living, that’s why we’re saying we’re not ceasing vending on the whole but we want to be able to take care of that square. We understand all the concerns, the thieves, the junkies… that is why we are in a massive push for the reorganisation of that square,” Duncan told the crowd.Despite his attempts to calm the gathering, the protestors continued to vent their anger over the current management of City Hall.On Thursday, Town Clerk Royston King during a meeting with some 400 vendors said that they would be removed for four months to facilitate a clean-up exercise as part of an overarching plan to secure the integrity and health of Stabroek Market Square.In the agreement City Hall imposed, it was stated that a “massive clean-up” exercise will take place on Sunday May 1 and vendors, who have stalls in the municipal markets, were asked to return and occupy those stalls. Should these vendors fail to do so, it will result in the “repossession of those facilities.”“Vendors, who are plying their trade at the Stabroek Market Square and contiguous areas would be temporary relocated to a plot of land south of the Parliament Building. The Council would provide lighting, 24 hours security, and sanitary facilities,” the Council had noted.At the meeting Thursday, King told stakeholders that land is adequate for all the vendors especially those who reside on the periphery of the square. Vendors had raised concerns over the plot of land identified. They had questioned if there would indeed have enough space for all of them to ply their trade.City Council had however stated that all vendors at the meeting supported the plans.last_img read more

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A new weapon to fight cancer

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREFrumpy Middle-aged Mom: My realistic 2020 New Year’s resolutions. Some involve doughnuts.Until 1996, the drug’s developer, Mark Davis, had never thought of tackling cancer. A successful chemical engineer, for years he had worked at Caltech creating new materials with applications ranging from pharmaceuticals to semiconductors. Then his wife, Mary, was diagnosed with breast cancer. She underwent severe chemotherapy – losing her hair and her appetite and spending three weeks in isolation while her immune system rebuilt itself. “She basically said, `There’s got to be a better way than this, why don’t you start working on it?’,” Davis said. Davis began reading and researching other scientists’ work for ideas. “When you look into a new area, you’re thinking `What can I do that somebody else hasn’t tried?”‘ he said. It was a daunting challenge, but in the 10 years since his wife’s successful battle against the disease, Davis created a new nanoparticle drug-delivery system that could revolutionize cancer treatment. PASADENA – Ray Natha has been fighting pancreatic cancer for four years. After his diagnosis, he underwent chemotherapy, but the drugs’ side effects – crippling nausea and fatigue, extreme anxiety before treatments and a blighted immune system – were more than he could bear. “It was very, very tough – I couldn’t take it,” said Natha, a 53-year-old Walnut resident. “\ don’t tell you how many people walk away and resign themselves to their fate.” Even worse, the treatment didn’t work. The cancer was resistant, and by 2004 it had spread to his lungs. But one Caltech researcher’s determination to find a less debilitating treatment for his own wife’s cancer has brought fresh hope to Natha and others facing the rigors of chemo. Natha is the first human subject in the trials of a promising new nanomedicine being developed that – in animal tests – shrunk even drug-resistant tumors while causing only minor side effects. After much experimentation, Davis designed tiny nets made of rings of sugar molecules that could carry caches of cancer-fighting drugs deep into tumors. By creating these nets from scratch, Davis was able to make them just small enough to pass from the bloodstream into the tumor, just large enough not to be filtered out by the kidneys and have just the right chemistry to allow them to sneak into cancer cells and release their toxic cargo. “It’s challenging chemically,” said Robert Langer, a chemical engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “It’s not just making them small – it’s making sure they have all the right properties. It’s just a major, major advance.” Davis’ nanomedicine takes advantage of some unique cancer properties to improve on the chemotherapy treatment given today. Tumors constantly need new blood vessels to nourish them. These new vessels are leakier than mature ones – allowing the nanoparticles to leave the bloodstream only there instead of pervading the entire body. Furthermore, it’s the cancer cells’ increased acidity that unravels the molecular net Davis developed, slowly releasing the drug. “It’s like a timed release,” he said – a molecular replacement for the pump some patients wear to ensure they are getting an ongoing source of cancer-fighting agents. Combining these factors keep most of the drugs’ toxicity limited to the tumor, instead of also ravaging the immune system, digestive tract and hair follicles. In animal studies, these factors combined to yield impressive and heartening results. But, cautioned Davis, “the difficulty in this area is it doesn’t count until you put it in humans.” For the next one to two years, City of Hope will host trials of the drug’s safety in 24 patients, followed – if all goes well – by larger-scale tests to determine if it remains as potent as it first seemed. “People lined up for this treatment because they had already been treated and nothing could stop their disease – it still progressed,” said City of Hope oncologist Yun Yen, who is leading the trial. Among them, Natha is eagerly awaiting the results of tests two weeks from now to see if his tumors have shrunken. Even before then, though, the news has been hopeful. “I’ve been running around, doing things. I’m hoping that it will be successful – it’s going to make a lot of people’s lives easier.” [email protected] (626) 578-600, Ext. 4451160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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