Clarendon Community Gets New Bridge

first_imgClarendon Community Gets New BridgeJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Advertisements RelatedJUTC And Stakeholders To Curb Indiscipline At Transport Centre RelatedJamaica Deposits Maritime Instruments at IMO Clarendon Community Gets New Bridge TransportDecember 2, 2013Written by: Garfield L. Angus FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail center_img RelatedJUTC To Save Up To $150 Million Per Year By Removing Free Transfer System Residents of Southwood in Clarendon, now have easier access to their communities, and to the wider Frankfield area, with the opening of a $24 million bridge.Speaking at the opening ceremony for the structure, Minister of State in the Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing, Hon. Richard Azan, said the bridge will enable the residents to travel in a manner befitting a modern community.He noted that cooperation between the contractors and citizens had enabled the speedy completion of the project.“This project was done on time, and within budget. It shows that when you have little money you can do things that can touch many lives,” he said while informing the residents that the bridge will be meshed to make it safer for children.The Minister stressed that the situation where the residents had to cross a river to get into the community was not safe, and was particularly inconvenient during the rainy season.“Today we do not have to do that anymore, we can walk on the bridge…we can do things when we put hands and hearts together,” he said. Photo: Garfield Angus Minister of State in the Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing, Hon. Richard Azan (5th left), who is also Member of Parliament for North West Clarendon, cuts the ribbon to officially open the Southwood Bridge, in the Parish on November 29. Others (from left) are: Councillor for the Thompson Town Division, Kevin Shirley; Chief Executive Officer of the National Works Agency (NWA), E.G. Hunter; Councillor for the Frankfield Division, Orville Hackett; and community leader, Karen Carty. The bridge was constructed at a cost of $24 million. Story HighlightsResidents of Southwood in Clarendon, now have easier access to their communities, and to the wider Frankfield area.The bridge will enable the residents to travel in a manner befitting a modern community.Cooperation between the contractors and citizens had enabled the speedy completion of the project.last_img read more

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Kyle Busch grabs top spot in final New Hampshire practice

first_imgRELATED: Final practice results | Truex on pole | Weekend scheduleKyle Busch secured the top spot in final Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series practice Saturday at New Hampshire Motor Speedway.Busch, a two-time New Hampshire winner, clocked a fast lap of 130.950 mph around the 1.058-mile track. Busch’s Joe Gibbs Racing No. 18 Toyota is scheduled to start seventh in Sunday’s Overton’s 301 (3 p.m. ET, NBCSN, PRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio).Martin Truex Jr. and Denny Hamlin tied for second on the leaderboard, posting identical speeds of 130.568 mph. Truex’s Furniture Row Racing No. 78 Toyota will lead the 39-car field to green after claiming the Coors Light Pole in Friday qualifying. Hamlin’s speed came in a back-up car, unloaded after his primary car was damaged in a crash in opening practice.Kyle Larson landed the fourth-fastest spot in final practice at 130.514 mph in the Chip Ganassi Racing No. 42 Chevrolet. Larson will start last in Sunday’s 301-lapper after his apparent pole-winning qualifying speed was disallowed Friday.Chase Elliott completed the top five, just ahead of Hendrick Motorsports teammate Jimmie Johnson in the 55-minute final tune-up.Aric Almirola, set to make his first start after a seven-race absence because of injury, was 21st-fastest in the Richard Petty Motorsports No. 43 Ford. Almirola has been sidelined since suffering a broken back in a May 13 crash at Kansas Speedway.Seven teams had time deducted from Saturday’s final practice for either failing pre-race inspection last week at Kentucky Speedway or pre-qualifying inspection Friday at New Hampshire — or both. The following teams were held for 15 minutes:Stewart-Haas Racing No. 4 Ford of Kevin HarvickHendrick Motorsports No. 24 Chevrolet of Chase ElliottHendrick Motorsports No. 88 Chevrolet of Dale Earnhardt Jr.The following teams were docked 30 minutes of time in final practice:Stewart-Haas Racing No. 14 Ford of Clint BowyerChip Ganassi Racing No. 42 Chevrolet of Kyle LarsonFurniture Row Racing No. 77 Toyota of Erik JonesCircle Sport/The Motorsports Group No. 33 Chevrolet of Jeffrey EarnhardtTruex tops in Saturday early practiceRELATED: Practice 2 results | Best 10-lap timesCoors Light Pole winner Martin Truex Jr. backed up his show of speed Saturday morning in the second Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series practice at New Hampshire Motor Speedway.Truex, the series’ points leader, registered the fastest lap in the 55-minute session, driving the Furniture Row Racing No. 78 Toyota to a 131.338 mph speed. He’ll start first in Sunday’s Overton’s 301 (3 p.m. ET, NBCSN, PRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio) on the 1.058-mile track.Kyle Larson, second to Truex in the standings, was also second to Truex on the practice leaderboard, just .001 seconds back at 131.333 mph in the Chip Ganassi Racing No. 42 Chevrolet. Larson had initially taken first place in Friday’s qualifying, but his speed was disallowed after his car failed post-qualifying inspection for an unapproved rear decklid fin.Jimmie Johnson was third-fastest in the Hendrick Motorsports No. 48 Chevrolet at 131.184 mph, just ahead of his teammate Chase Elliott in fourth (131.162). Brad Keselowski rounded out the top five (131.071) in the Team Penske No. 2 Ford.Aric Almirola, in the midst of his first race weekend since breaking his back in a May 13 crash at Kansas, was 25th-fastest in the Richard Petty Motorsports No. 43 Ford.Teams experimented with different racing grooves after track workers re-applied the PJ1 traction agent in the turns. Officials added to the bottom lane and then extended the top lane with a four-foot wide strip of the traction compound before Saturday’s on-track activity.last_img read more

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Pa. Ambulance Service Seeks Volunteers

first_img“We try to have a scheduled crew from 9 in the evening until 6 in the morning every day,” said Steve Zimmerman, a volunteer who works as a full-time EMT for First Aid and Safety Patrol. Because Elco High School offers a basic EMT course, the unit receives a few trained volunteers, but only a handful stick around for more than a year or two, Mike Belleman noted. The group holds monthly meetings and training sessions. “We probably had over 500 (ambulance) calls,” said Mike Belleman, who serves as Newmanstown’s fire chief. “I went 65 hours in one week,” Mike Belleman said. “We get along really good,” Zimmerman said. “Our guys work together.” “There are people who do grant writing,” he said. “We have apartment rentals we need help with.” His wife, Vicki, works as a certified emergency medical technician for First Aid and Safety Patrol and volunteers with Newmanstown’s ambulance service. In addition to Millcreek Township, Newmanstown responds to calls in Richland and part of western Berks County, including Womelsdorf and portions of Marion and North Heidelberg townships. At least two technicians go out on each call. “All are somewhat active, but those 11 are the core people who take the rig out on the roads,” Mike Belleman said. Newmanstown ambulance also offers CPR classes for the public, the next of which is scheduled for 9 a.m. Saturday. “Homeland Security is really pushing new training,” he said. “People take everything for granted, especially people who moved here,” Mike Belleman said. “They think we have paid services with EMS and fire, because they may have had that where they lived before.” “For grants, you have to have documentation (of training),” Mike Belleman said. “If you don’t have your certs, you can’t even bill (for services).” Like other all-volunteer organizations, Newmanstown (Pa.) Ambulance relies on the time its members can contribute. Because many of them hold full-time jobs, it’s tough to find enough volunteers to answer all the calls.center_img “They have to be 16 to ride along as an observer,” Zimmerman said. “At least that can get them into the environment.” The Bellemans operate a family construction and cabinet company. In emergencies, like the January ice storm or last summer’s flooding, they and their sons “shut down and move down here,” Vicki Belleman said. “We had a great crew for the ice storm.” Although Newmanstown ambulance has a roster of about two-dozen responders, only 11 are regulars. “She makes sure everyone’s certifications are up to date,” Zimmerman said. Newmanstown Ambulance responded to 474 calls in 2005 and 478 calls in 2006. Last year, the total responses declined to 405 — not because there were fewer calls but because volunteers weren’t always available. Mike Belleman said the company needs volunteers who assist with other duties besides responding for emergencies and transports. “Each call lasts two and a half to three hours,” Vicki Belleman said. “Then we have reports to file with the state.” Although the fire company and ambulance service are separate entities, they work as a team. Zimmerman began his career in 1986. He has had hundreds of hours of training and, along with the other volunteers, is required by state and federal laws to undergo updates continually. If Newmanstown isn’t available, a neighboring ambulance is called from Myerstown or Schaefferstown in Lebanon County, Reinholds in Lancaster County or Robesonia in Berks County. Zimmerman’s wife, Barbara, is Newmanstown’s training officer. Leading the way last year was Kim Hurst, who responded to 123 calls, followed by Vicki Belleman with 116 and Charles McCully with 107. NEWMANSTOWN, Pa. — This growing community’s ambulance service is seeking reinforcements. For more information about the class or volunteering, call (610) [email protected]last_img read more

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News Scan for Jun 27, 2017

first_imgMeta-analysis documents rise in drug-resistant bacteria at the HajjA review and meta-analysis of studies on bacterial transmission and antibiotic resistance during the annual pilgrimage to Mecca has found rising rates of resistance among certain gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, researchers report in Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease.The review of drug-resistant bacteria at the Hajj included 31 studies involving pilgrims, food workers, and local patients at hospitals in Mecca, Mina, and Medina. The studies were conducted during the Hajj seasons from 2000 to 2015 and most of them provided antibiotic susceptibility results, with 11 identifying antibiotic-resistance genes. While many of the pilgrims came from different continents and countries, most were from Saudi Arabia and France; the majority of patients with infections were from Saudi Arabia.While resistance rates varied between studies, the review indicates rising rates of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the Hajj area. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from food handlers rose from 0 in a 2001-02 study to 20% in a 2014 study, while MRSA isolated from pilgrims rose from 1% in 2000 to 63.2% in 2015. Studies of patients with bacterial infections reported rising rates of third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Acinetobacter baumannii from 2005 to 2015, ranging from 18.8% to 94%.Carbapenem-resistant bacteria were detected in fewer than 10% of E coli isolates but up to 100% of K pneumoniae and A baumannii isolates. An increase in colistin-resistant bacteria, including MCR-1–producing E coli and K pneumoniae, was also noted. Rates of vancomycin-resistant gram-positive bacteria remained low.The rising rates of antibiotic resistant bacteria are a concern because the mass gathering, which involves more than 2 million participants from over 184 countries each year, can facilitate the acquisition and spread of bacterial pathogens. “Hajj pilgrims therefore have the potential to disseminate or acquire [antibiotic resistant] bacteria during their stay in Saudi Arabia and to spread these bacteria when returning to their home country,” the authors write.Jun 24 Travel Med Infect Dis abstractAnother MERS case confirmed in Riyadh The Saudi Arabian Ministry of Health (MOH) said there was another case of MERS-CoV in Riyadh, the site of three concurrent hospital-based outbreaks, late last week.A 70-year-old Saudi man is in critical condition after being diagnosed as having Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). The man’s source of infection is under investigation, but he was not a healthcare worker.The MOH also said a previously reported case, a 47-year-old expatriate man in Riyadh, has died from MERS.The new cases bring Saudi Arabia’s MERS-CoV total since 2012 total 1,667, including 680 deaths. Thirteen people are still being treated for their infections, the MOH said in its latest update today.Jun 23 MOH report Jun 27 MOH reportNew Mexico reports 2 more cases of human plagueThe New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) announced two more human cases of plague yesterday, bringing the state’s total this year to three.  All three cases have been reported in Santa Fe County.The new cases were confirmed in two women, ages 52 and 62. The women, like the first patient identified on Jun 7, are hospitalized. So far, there have been no deaths.Plague is a serious and sometimes fatal bacterial infection transmitted to humans via flea bites or contact with infected animals.”Pets that are allowed to roam and hunt can bring infected fleas from dead rodents back into the home, putting you and your children at risk,” said Paul Ettestad, DVM, public health veterinarian for the NMDOH in a press release. “Keeping your pets at home or on a leash and using an appropriate flea control product is important to protect you and your family.”Last year there were four human plague cases in New Mexico with no fatalities. In 2015 there were also four cases, including one death.Jun 26 NMDOH press release Cat bite suspected as source of Minnesota woman’s tularemia infectionThe Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) recently notified health providers about a human tularemia case in Dakota County, located in the southern Twin Cities metro area. It occurred in a 60-year-old woman who got sick after she was bitten by a stray cat.The woman suffered the bite on May 10 and became ill May 13 with headache, muscle aches, worsening wound infection, lymphadenopathy, and fever, according to a Jun 21 HAN notice. She was hospitalized twice for a total of 6 days. Clinicians isolated Francisella tularensis from her bite wound.Tularemia in Minnesota is rare in animals and humans, the MDH said, adding that in 2016, however, cases were detected in 3 people, 12 cats, and 2 rabbits, an increase over previous years.Jun 21 MDH HAN notice Latest HPV vaccine follow-up finds further prevalence drop, herd immunityIn the latest study to gauge the impact of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine since it was first routinely recommended for girls in 2006, researchers found that 8 years following introduction, the vaccine decreased prevalence of the four strains covered by the vaccine by 71% in 14- to 19-year-olds and that its effectiveness is high at 83%.Researchers from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) based their findings on HPV prevalence based on self-collected cervicovaginal swabs collected as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHNES). The samples have been collected since 2003, which allowed the group to compare HPV prevalence before and after the vaccine was introduced. Earlier studies have already confirmed benefits of the vaccine, and the latest study, published yesterday in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, looked at NHNES data through 2014 and explored other issues, such as possible herd protection and cross-protection against other strains.For the 20- to 24-year-old age-group, the team saw a 61% decline from prevaccine levels, but they didn’t see a significant decline for women ages 25 to 29 or 30 to 34. They said the larger increases in the current study for the two younger age-groups reflect increasing vaccine coverage.For the first time in the US population, researchers saw a significant decline (34%) in the vaccine HPV types in unvaccinated women, which suggests herd protection, another consequence of rising vaccine coverage.The 83% vaccine effectiveness observed, though high, was still less than the greater-than-96% level seen in clinical trials, which the researchers said could reflect the fact that the study probably included some females who were infected before vaccination and some who did not receive the whole vaccine series.The study didn’t find strong evidence of cross-protection or any worrisome increases in HPV types that aren’t included in the four-strain vaccine.Jun 26 J Infect Dis abstract Belgium reports two more H5N8 outbreaksIn the latest avian flu outbreak developments, Belgium reported two more highly pathogenic H5N8 events, according to a report today from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).The country has reported several outbreaks since early June. The newest ones involve nonpoultry species including wild birds at two locations in Hainaut province in the west.Outbreaks began on Jun 20 and Jun 22, killing 57 of 86 susceptible birds. The surviving ones were slated for culling. Authorities said the source of the virus was the introduction of new live animals.Jun 27 OIE report on H5N8 in Belgiumlast_img read more

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