Message from Senator the Hon Sandrea Falconer, Minister Without Portfolio (Information), Office of the PM – In Observance of World Radio Day

first_imgRelatedGovernment Congratulates Kaci Fennell on Performance in Miss Universe Pageant Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister with Responsibility for Information, Senator the Hon. Sandrea Falconer. Message from Senator the Hon Sandrea Falconer, Minister Without Portfolio (Information), Office of the PM – In Observance of World Radio Day InformationFebruary 13, 2015Written by: Sen. Hon Sandrea Falconer RelatedGlowing Tributes to Ralston Smith at Funeral Service Advertisements RelatedJamaicans Encouraged to Vote in Public Sector Customer Service Competitioncenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Story HighlightsJamaica joins with other nations around the globe in observing World Radio Day, an initiative of the United Nations Educational Scientific & Cultural Organization (UNESCO).The theme of World Radio Day 2015 is ‘Youth and Radio’. It recognizes the fact that youth make up more than half of the people on Planet Earth.Radio in Jamaica has come a long way since its debut in 1939, and while today we boast a diverse and dynamic radio market, there is still a need to open up new opportunity windows for greater engagement of youth and meaningful programming which supports their development. Message from Senator the Hon Sandrea Falconer, Minister Without Portfolio (Information), Office of the PM – In Observance of World Radio DayJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Jamaica joins with other nations around the globe in observing World Radio Day, an initiative of the United Nations Educational Scientific & Cultural Organization (UNESCO).The theme of World Radio Day 2015 is ‘Youth and Radio’. It recognizes the fact that youth make up more than half of the people on Planet Earth. This significant demographic is not always adequately reflected in the level of meaningful participation in this powerful medium. In many parts of the world, the youth are confronted by some of the same challenges facing marginalized groups, such as stereotyping and prejudice in the way they are portrayed in the media.Here in Jamaica and despite the proliferation of media and the impressive reach of radio, a considerable proportion of media content continues to feature music and other aspects of entertainment geared to the youth, with less attention given to the many serious issues with which they grapple. The potential of radio as an agent of change and development remains for the most part, under-utilized.The time has come to use this medium to its fullest advantage; as a developmental tool, an avenue through which youth can be more inspired and equipped, as well as a louder and more effective voice in the shaping of national policy. Communities and the nation as a whole could do well with more youth-focused programmes developed, produced, scripted and presented by young people.Radio in Jamaica has come a long way since its debut in 1939, and while today we boast a diverse and dynamic radio market, there is still a need to open up new opportunity windows for greater engagement of youth and meaningful programming which supports their development.On this World Radio Day, I also salute the pioneers of the industry, and those who work and contribute to radio fulfilling its role to inform, educate and entertain. However, as the UNESCO Director General has charged, let us “rally round radio” and support its efforts to be more and do more for the cause of development. Let us continue to find ingenious ways to make radio a true agent of social inclusion, a meaningful forum for the discussion of youth issues, and a facilitator for dialogue between youth and other sections of the community.last_img read more

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Is it time for Florida to play in the legal lab/sandbox?

first_imgIs it time for Florida to play in the legal lab/sandbox? May 11, 2021 By Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Top Stories A giant, online provider of self-help legal forms and a Catholic order of nuns are among around two dozen entities that have applied under the Utah Supreme Court’s new legal lab that encourages creative ways to offer legal services to consumers.The head of that program, past Utah State Bar President John Lund, and Utah Supreme Court Justice Deno Himonas discussed how the program operates with the Bar’s Special Committee to Improve the Delivery of Legal Services, which is considering whether to recommend that Florida set up its own legal lab. The committee at its April 6 meeting also heard from Crispin Passmore, who helped set up a legal lab — also called a regulatory sandbox — in Great Britain.The committee took no action at the meeting although members closely questioned the trio.The legal lab/sandbox idea is to allow individuals and organizations to propose innovative ways of providing legal services while still meeting core values of the legal profession to protect consumers. Applicants can get waivers from some regulatory rules, but in exchange agree to be closely monitored by the lab to measure how many people are being helped, the cost, effectiveness of the program, and any complaints it generates.Utah and Arizona have approved such labs, and California is considering it. Jurisdictions in Canada have also set up labs, as has Great Britain.The key, according to Lund, Himonas, and Passmore, is that while there should be flexibility in business structures and approaches, there should be none on compromising client protections and core legal profession values whether services are provided by lawyers or nonlawyers.“It’s not about less regulation, it’s about better types of regulation. It’s about regulation affecting customers,” Passmore said. “We can do that by changing the structures and restrictions without changing the ethical restrictions on attorneys.”In response to a question about risks associated with programs approved by a legal lab, he added, “You manage that risk by being clear from the start what’s non-negotiable and what’s non-negotiable to me are those core values. Those standards cannot be weakened through a sandbox.”Passmore also said that since Great Britain adopted its sandbox regulations in 2014-15, approved programs run entirely or partly by nonlawyers have had a slightly lower complaint and discipline rate than those run by lawyers.Lund and Himonas said Utah decided not to limit legal lab applicants to certain areas of law or certain types of organizations.“One of the assumptions we made going in is we don’t know what we don’t know about innovation and where that innovation might happen,” Himonas said.Lund said even though Utah might be considered a small legal marketplace, it has attracted a wide variety of programs into its lab.That includes online companies like RocketLawyer with its forms services and Hello Divorce, which is in California, Colorado, and Utah.“At the other end of it, we have more what I call the Steve Jobs of their time. They’re working in their garage, they have an idea for a business, and they can demonstrate it’s a viable concept,” Lund said, adding those are mostly solo and small-firm lawyer efforts although they may have private investors.A third type comes from nonprofit organizations. Lund said the Utah Supreme Court has recently approved two nonprofit programs that help consumers with debt collections problems. One is aimed at those with medical debts including using a diversion program to avoid court. The other is run by the Sisters of the Holy Cross.“Those are very much experiments. These are things the court is allowing people to try to see if they are helpful, if they are something consumers like,” Lund said.Another program is aimed toward social workers and advocates who are working with domestic violence victims to help, with attorney supervision, those victims fill out requests for protective orders and other forms.Since legal labs are intended to generate information about whether programs actually address consumer needs, Lund and Himonas spent considerable time discussing Utah’s operation.Lund said the executive committee of Utah’s Office of Legal Services Innovation brings diverse experiences to evaluating and monitoring programs approved in its sandbox. That includes a MacArthur Foundation Fellows award winning social scientist, a former economist with the National Center of State Courts, and the current Utah State Bar president.The office has also hired a data scientist professor to determine what information program participants must provide and to review the periodic reports participants file.In response to a question, Lund said the office does evaluate applicants based on perceived risk. Smaller programs that are associated with lawyers are generally considered low risk such as the bankruptcy attorney whose request was to allow his paralegal to be a 10% owner of the firm.The further the operation is from a traditional legal practice and the more involved nonlawyers or online services are in providing services, the more high risk the program is rated and it will consequently have closer and more frequent scrutiny, he said.“What that means is we’re going to follow them more carefully, we’re going to require more data from them…we’re going to utilize audit services to test what’s happening,” Lund said. He said individuals may also be sent in to test the program without the knowledge of the provider.All consumers are informed up front the provider is part of a test and informed how to make a complaint if they are dissatisfied, he said.Programs, Lund said, have incentives to follow rules and provide valuable services because otherwise their permission to operate can be revoked, and they are also subject to normal civil tort and contract sanctions.Former Bar President John Stewart, chair of the special committee, asked about selling such a concept to a traditionally conservative legal profession. Lund replied by citing repeated studies and surveys that show about 15% of the U.S. population gets legal services it needs and about 85% does not.“I don’t know how lawyers can claim that something else doesn’t need to be tried in the face of that fact,” Lund said. “It’s not a very strong position to stand on.”The Utah Office of Legal Services Innovation has a webpage at https://utahinnovationoffice.org/.The special committee has also posted a report from the office, information from Passmore, and other reports and data it has collected on its Bar webpage at: https://www.floridabar.org/about/cmtes/cmtes-me/special-committee-to-improve-the-delivery-of-legal-services/.The Supreme Court created the special committee in late 2019 and charged it with reviewing Bar rules to improve the delivery of legal services to consumers and “to assure Florida lawyers play a proper and prominent role in the provision of these services.” Its final report is due to the court and the Bar Board of Governors by July 1.last_img read more

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Subway Classic commences regular season for Gophers

first_imgSubway Classic commences regular season for GophersMinnesota plays San Francisco on Saturday at Williams Arena. Emily WickstromNovember 18, 2005Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintAfter two exhibition blowout wins, Minnesota’s women’s basketball team will finally open its regular season with Division I competition this weekend.The Gophers will play host in the Subway Classic this Saturday and Sunday. All games will be at Williams Arena.In the opening games, No. 16 Minnesota will face San Francisco at 3 p.m., with Stanford and Long Island playing a 1 p.m. matchup.“Our whole team in general is just really excited to start our season,” junior forward Liz Podominick said. “Exhibition games are fun, but we have a great chance to play some great teams.”If the Gophers get by the Dons, they likely will face Stanford in Sunday’s 3 p.m. championship game.“We’re taking it one game at a time,” Minnesota coach Pam Borton said. “San Francisco’s the best team in the country and that’s how we’re going into this weekend.”Although the 11th-ranked Cardinal graduated three starters, they have reloaded and once again are expected to make a deep run in the NCAA tournament and win the Pac-10 conference for the sixth year in a row. To stop Stanford, the Gophers likely will have to stop sophomore guard Candace Wiggins, a Kodak All-American who averaged 17.5 points per game last season.But Minnesota’s depth is significant, giving the Gophers one clear advantage over the Cardinal.Senior guard Shannon Schonrock and junior post players Lauren Lacey and Natasha Williams were the exhibition-game stars, but any player in Minnesota’s rotation can potentially contribute.The Gophers will probably go nine or 10 players deep, depending on how many minutes senior guard April Calhoun plays in her first game back from injury.“I think that we have a lot of different weapons and a lot of people that can do a lot of different things,” Schonrock said. “Each person on our team top to bottom brings something different.”Borton said she will still be experimenting with her lineup and rotation to find out what combinations of players work best together.“We want some of our weaknesses exposed early on so they’re not exposed in the Big Ten,” Borton said. “This is a great test for our team and where we’re at.”last_img read more

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Top-ranked Iowa coming to the Barn for much-anticipated Friday matchup

first_imgRobinson coached for 12 years at the University of Iowa as a graduate assistant, assistant coach and briefly served as an interim head coach in 1984 before becoming the Gophers head coach the next year.Robinson assisted under wrestling legends Gary Kurdelmeier and Dan Gable during his time with the Hawkeyes, and he credits much of his success as a coach to them.“I’ve worked with a lot of great people in my career in wrestling, but I felt like a lot of people at Iowa really complemented what I was trying to do as a coach,” he said. “Obviously you make your own style, but I’ve definitely gleaned a lot from those guys at Iowa.”Iowa went 189-13-7 while Robinson was there, and he has gone 329-105-3 as a head coach with the Gophers.Reiter, from Gilbertville, Iowa, was a four-time state champion in high school. He made a splash in wrestling circles when he became the first blue-chip wrestler to leave the state and join the Gophers.Reiter said he felt a lot of animosity the first time the Gophers wrestled against Iowa, but it has died down over the years.“After five years here, I basically think of myself as a Minnesotan,” he said. “That doesn’t mean I don’t want to beat them, though.”Noteworthy• Things won’t get much easier for the Gophers as they travel to Stillwater to wrestle No. 3 Oklahoma State at 1 p.m. Sunday. Robinson said that the difficult scheduling was intentional, as he wants to prepare the team for NCAA tournament conditions.• Sixth ranked senior Roger Kish, who hasn’t wrestled since Dec. 6, has been cleared to wrestle the match. No. 2 Dustin Schlatter is still questionable, but didn’t practice early this week.• The athletics department has sold around 5,000 tickets for the event, but expects a large walk-up crowd. The largest attendance for a wrestling match in Williams Arena was in 1998 against Iowa when 11,284 viewers showed up. Top-ranked Iowa coming to the Barn for much-anticipated Friday matchupThis season the Hawkeyes returned to No. 1 for the first time since 2000. Trevor BornFebruary 1, 2008Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintOn March 12, 2000, Iowa narrowly edged the Gophers to win the Big Ten title. They would run away with the national championship six days later.It was Iowa’s sixth straight NCAA wrestling championship, and their 26th Big Ten title in 27 years. It was also the last day of Iowa’s quarter-century reign over college wrestling; they have won zero national championships and just one Big Ten title since.This year could mark their return. The Hawkeyes (14-1, 3-0 Big Ten) come to Williams Arena at 7 p.m. Friday on a seven-meet winning streak and ranked first in the country for the first time since 2000.“Everybody knows who Iowa is, but they haven’t been the same the last couple years,” Gophers head coach J Robinson said. “This year they look a lot more like the Hawkeyes of old.”They are led by fiery second-year coach Tom Brands, who has a 28-6 record since taking over for Jim Zalesky.Seven of the 10 Hawkeyes expected to wrestle Friday are ranked in the top 10 nationally.“They’re pretty much airtight,” third-ranked Manuel Rivera said. “We have ranked guys, and they have ranked guys, and there isn’t going to be any boring matches. They have a killer lineup this year.”For years, Iowa dominated what is one of the most storied rivalries in college sports, beating the Gophers 58 out of the first 74 times they met, starting in 1921. But Minnesota has gradually taken over as the nation’s elite wrestling team and has won nine of the past 14 meetings, highlighted by a 25-9 win in 2005.With a win over the fourth-ranked Gophers (12-3, 2-0 Big Ten) in their own arena, Iowa could prove they are again the team to beat in college wrestling. A win for the Gophers would likely mean taking over the No. 1 ranking in the country.“We know that a whole lot is on the line,” senior Mack Reiter said. “Every year this is a huge match for us, but with them being No. 1, it might even be a little more intense this year.”Iowa connectionslast_img read more

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Crowley makes waves

first_imgCrowley’s Houston based solutions project management team completed the delivery in three stages, working in both nearshore and offshore waters.The first phase saw the topsides skidded onto Crowley’s 455 series high-deck-strength barge Julie B at the Keiwit facility dock in Corpus Christi, where they were lifted and installed onto the hull of Jack/St. Malo. Once in place the tugs Ocean Wind and Ocean Wave pushed the production facility away from Corpus Christi and through the Texan port of Aransas into deeper waters.During the second phase, the Ocean Wind and Ocean Sun towed the facility to its final location, alongside the contracted tugboat Harvey War Horse II, while Crowley’s barges were also towed out to the project site in order to deliver the piles that serve as anchors for the platform.In the final stage of the project, the Ocean Wind, Ocean Wave, Ocean Sky, Ocean Sun and Harvey War Horse II worked together to hold the Jack/St. Malo in its final position, and remained on site in a star formation to provide support as the spar was connected to its moorings.Schedules to begin producing oil and natural gas later this year, the facility will have a capacity of 170,000 barrels of oil a day and will act as a hub for the 43 subsea wells, including pumps and other equipment on the sea floor.  www.crowley.comlast_img read more

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China donates $2m to WFP for Somalia aid

first_imgAuthorities in Somalia are grappling with the effects of climatic change.According to a recent  Food and Agriculture Organization report  five million people in Somalia are not getting enough food, which is more than 40 percent of the country’s population. Among them, over 300,000 children under five are acutely malnourished.The Chinese government has donated two million U.S. dollars to the World Food Programme (WFP) for its humanitarian work in Somalia as part of China’s assistance to the Horn of African nation.The  donation will go towards providing access to nutritious and curative food for malnourished children and mothers.last_img read more

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It’s now Dave’s Lawn Mower Parts “and Service”

first_imgCARYVILLE, TN (WLAF) – For years, Dave Crabtree has been asked if he services lawn mowers.  For years, he’s said no.  So, finally, after all these years, Dave is saying “yes” to service.Mike Albright has come off the road driving his big 18-wheeler and is now taking care of your service needs at Dave’s Lawn Mower Parts & Service.  Mike’ll take care of sharpening your blades, tuning up and repairing your mower, oil changes, mounting tires and more.Dave’s Lawn Mower Parts & Service also serves as Caryville’s local man cave where’s there’s never a shortage of tall tales and laughs.  Dave doesn’t like to brag, but many of the world’s problems have been solved right there in his shop.Dave and Mike are offering a limited time service special.  The $75 special includes parts and labor of an oil change, oil, oil filter, air filter, gas filter, spark plugs and blade sharpening.Dave’s Lawn Mower Parts & Service is behind Scotty’s in Caryville at I-75.  The telephone number is 423.912.9900. (WLAF NEWS PUBLISHED – 03/27/2020-6AM)Share this:FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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Must win game for Nenagh

first_imgPhoto © Tipp FM Nenagh Ormond take on Galway Corinthians tonight in Division 2A of the Ulster Bank League.Nenagh need to win to stay in the hunt for a play off place.Kick off at New Ormond Park is at 8pm.last_img

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Jennifer Hudson dishes on former co-stars in November issue of “Cosmopolitan”

first_imgABC/Fred Lee(LOS ANGELES) — The Voice coach Jennifer Hudson is Cosmopolitan‘s November cover star, and inside the pages of the magazine she gives one-word answers to describe a few of her former co-stars, like Beyoncé and Sex and the City actress Sarah Jessica Parker. JHud calls Bey “Sisterly” and Sarah “Genuine.” As for Adam Sandler and Empire‘s Taraji P. Henson, the former is is “Funny,” while Taraji is unmistakably Jennifer’s “Homegirl.”  The “Walk It Out” singer also dishes on another co-star — fellow Voice coach Blake Shelton — telling Cosmo that if given the chance to pick one of the show’s coaches to guide her, it would be “Blake, because we have the most similar taste in music.”As for JHud’s dream costar, she answers, “Jennifer Lawrence,” and adds that she’d love to guest-star on HBO’s “Insecure with Issa Rae.” To read more of Jennifer Hudson’s interview, pick up Cosmopolitan‘s November issue, which hits newsstands Tuesday, October 10.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMatico Relatedlast_img read more

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Female athletes get a trio of wins in equality fight

first_imgThe U.S. women’s national soccer team struck a new collective bargaining agreement with their federation, ending more than a year of at times contentious negotiations, with players seeking comparable compensation to the men’s national team.It followed the U.S. national hockey team’s deal with USA Hockey after players threatened to boycott the women’s world championships over wages. The U.S. team stands during the national anthem after defeating Canada 3-2 in overtime in the title game of the women’s hockey world championships, Friday, April 7, 2017, in Plymouth, Mich. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)The quest for better pay and conditions even extended across the Atlantic to Ireland, where the women’s national soccer team there threatened to sit out of an exhibition match this week.“It’s pretty incredible what the women’s hockey team did and they were courageous in their fight. There were differences between our battle and their battle, but they were inspirational,” U.S. midfielder Megan Rapinoe said. “For us and them, we were able to inspire other teams.”The actions of these teams highlight the struggle for female athletes to achieve fair compensation for their efforts, even if that doesn’t mean identical paychecks to their male counterparts. ‘Fair’ can include even simple items like access to changing rooms, in the case of the Irish players.It is not a new fight.Back in 1995, a group of high-profile players including Michelle Akers, Julie Foudy, Mia Hamm and Kristine Lilly were locked out of a pre-Olympic training camp because of a disagreement over bonus pay with the U.S. Soccer Federation. The dispute was quickly settled and women’s soccer made its debut at the 1996 Atlanta Games. The United States won the gold.Following the team’s victory on penalty kicks in the 1999 World Cup final against China, the players boycotted a tournament in Australia. They eventually came to terms on a deal with the federation that extended through the 2004 Athens Olympics.Inspired by the soccer players, Olympian Cammi Granato pushed USA Hockey in 2000 for better conditions and pay. The hockey team was coming off a gold-medal-winning run in the 1998 Nagano Games, the first Olympics that included the women’s game as a sport.With the help John Langel, the same lawyer who helped the soccer team strike its deal, the players sent a letter to the federation outlining their concerns. Lacking leverage to move the effort forward, it failed and the issue was largely dropped — until this year.Langel also helped the team reach its current agreement before the world championships. This time, a social media hashtag, #BeBoldForChange, helped make the cause an international sensation.“I think that this is just the beginning, and I think you’re going to see more of this. We are reaching the next level of women’s sports,” said U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota. “At the beginning it was just allowing women to play, then it was making sure they got funded in the schools so they could play, and now we’re reaching that biggest pinnacle, which is really getting them to the point where people are watching them as much as they watch men. And we’re not quite there yet, but the only way we get there is by using examples like what just happened with hockey and moving it out into other sports.”Ireland’s national team, made up mostly of amateurs with day jobs, wasn’t getting even basic financial support for things like compensation for time off from work while on international duty. Players said they’d been forced to dress in public restrooms and had to share team-branded apparel with the junior national teams.The women held a news conference decrying the conditions. It won the team public sympathy and helped force the Football Association of Ireland to work out an agreement with the women.Goalkeeper Emma Byrne posted to Twitter: “Victory! Thank you for all your support. It proves unity is a powerful force.”There have been other successes, too. The Australian women’s national soccer team, capitalizing on the team’s surprising play in the 2015 World Cup, boycotted friendlies in the United States and wound up negotiating a deal that got them better wages, bonuses and travel provisions.In tennis, Grand Slam events and many other tournaments give equal prize money to men and women. But lingering sexism flared up last year when Raymond Moore, director of the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California, made comments that outraged many and forced his resignation.“In my next life when I come back I want to be someone in the WTA because they ride on the coattails of the men. They don’t make any decisions and they are lucky. They are very, very lucky,” Moore said at the time.The backlash showed that Moore’s opinion was an outdated and tired trope.Women’s sports are more popular than ever, thanks in part to Title IX, which spurred increased female participation at the college level. The internet has given fans greater access to the games and its stars.That’s been coupled with some amazing performances by female athletes and teams in recent years: From Serena Williams’ dominance on the tennis court to Carli Lloyd’s hat trick in the 2015 Women’s World Cup final to UConn’s supremacy of college basketball.On Friday night, the U.S. women’s hockey team capped an emotional two weeks with a thrilling 3-2 overtime win over Canada in the world championship final.“If anything that we did can inspire anyone — sports, girls, boys, out of sports, whatever — to stand up for what they believe in, I think that’s a huge plus,” team captain Meghan Duggan said.___AP Hockey Writers Larry Lage and Stephen Whyno and AP freelancer Sean Shapiro contributed to this report. The U.S. women’s national soccer team and staff, led by Meghan Klingenberg, center in black, Alex Morgan, second right, and Becky Sauerbrunn, right, wave to fans as they leave the field after their 4-0 win over Russia in an international friendly soccer match in Frisco, Texas, Thursday, April 6, 2017. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)In a matter of days, female athletes around the globe scored a trio of wins in their fight for equality after decades of work.center_img The U.S. team stands during the national anthem after defeating Canada 3-2 in overtime in the title game of the women’s hockey world championships, Friday, April 7, 2017, in Plymouth, Mich. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)The quest for better pay and conditions even extended across the Atlantic to Ireland, where the women’s national soccer team there threatened to sit out of an exhibition match this week.“It’s pretty incredible what the women’s hockey team did and they were courageous in their fight. There were differences between our battle and their battle, but they were inspirational,” U.S. midfielder Megan Rapinoe said. “For us and them, we were able to inspire other teams.”The actions of these teams highlight the struggle for female athletes to achieve fair compensation for their efforts, even if that doesn’t mean identical paychecks to their male counterparts. ‘Fair’ can include even simple items like access to changing rooms, in the case of the Irish players.It is not a new fight.Back in 1995, a group of high-profile players including Michelle Akers, Julie Foudy, Mia Hamm and Kristine Lilly were locked out of a pre-Olympic training camp because of a disagreement over bonus pay with the U.S. Soccer Federation. The dispute was quickly settled and women’s soccer made its debut at the 1996 Atlanta Games. The United States won the gold.Following the team’s victory on penalty kicks in the 1999 World Cup final against China, the players boycotted a tournament in Australia. They eventually came to terms on a deal with the federation that extended through the 2004 Athens Olympics.Inspired by the soccer players, Olympian Cammi Granato pushed USA Hockey in 2000 for better conditions and pay. The hockey team was coming off a gold-medal-winning run in the 1998 Nagano Games, the first Olympics that included the women’s game as a sport.With the help John Langel, the same lawyer who helped the soccer team strike its deal, the players sent a letter to the federation outlining their concerns. Lacking leverage to move the effort forward, it failed and the issue was largely dropped — until this year.Langel also helped the team reach its current agreement before the world championships. This time, a social media hashtag, #BeBoldForChange, helped make the cause an international sensation.“I think that this is just the beginning, and I think you’re going to see more of this. We are reaching the next level of women’s sports,” said U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota. “At the beginning it was just allowing women to play, then it was making sure they got funded in the schools so they could play, and now we’re reaching that biggest pinnacle, which is really getting them to the point where people are watching them as much as they watch men. And we’re not quite there yet, but the only way we get there is by using examples like what just happened with hockey and moving it out into other sports.”Ireland’s national team, made up mostly of amateurs with day jobs, wasn’t getting even basic financial support for things like compensation for time off from work while on international duty. Players said they’d been forced to dress in public restrooms and had to share team-branded apparel with the junior national teams.The women held a news conference decrying the conditions. It won the team public sympathy and helped force the Football Association of Ireland to work out an agreement with the women.Goalkeeper Emma Byrne posted to Twitter: “Victory! Thank you for all your support. It proves unity is a powerful force.”There have been other successes, too. The Australian women’s national soccer team, capitalizing on the team’s surprising play in the 2015 World Cup, boycotted friendlies in the United States and wound up negotiating a deal that got them better wages, bonuses and travel provisions.In tennis, Grand Slam events and many other tournaments give equal prize money to men and women. But lingering sexism flared up last year when Raymond Moore, director of the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California, made comments that outraged many and forced his resignation.“In my next life when I come back I want to be someone in the WTA because they ride on the coattails of the men. They don’t make any decisions and they are lucky. They are very, very lucky,” Moore said at the time.The backlash showed that Moore’s opinion was an outdated and tired trope.Women’s sports are more popular than ever, thanks in part to Title IX, which spurred increased female participation at the college level. The internet has given fans greater access to the games and its stars.That’s been coupled with some amazing performances by female athletes and teams in recent years: From Serena Williams’ dominance on the tennis court to Carli Lloyd’s hat trick in the 2015 Women’s World Cup final to UConn’s supremacy of college basketball.On Friday night, the U.S. women’s hockey team capped an emotional two weeks with a thrilling 3-2 overtime win over Canada in the world championship final.“If anything that we did can inspire anyone — sports, girls, boys, out of sports, whatever — to stand up for what they believe in, I think that’s a huge plus,” team captain Meghan Duggan said.___AP Hockey Writers Larry Lage and Stephen Whyno and AP freelancer Sean Shapiro contributed to this report.,The U.S. women’s national soccer team struck a new collective bargaining agreement with their federation, ending more than a year of at times contentious negotiations, with players seeking comparable compensation to the men’s national team.It followed the U.S. national hockey team’s deal with USA Hockey after players threatened to boycott the women’s world championships over wages.last_img read more

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