Are parking meters a higher priority than municipal markets?

first_imgDear Editor,Something does not seem to make sense about the Georgetown City Constabulary. For years we have heard them cry out that they are extremely short of staff, and that they are constrained in carrying out their duties as a result of this, and that they are unable to attract new recruits, etc.However, just like that, all of a sudden, they are quite comfortably able to reassign 50 Constables armed to the teeth, far more than one-third of their staff strength if we are to be guided by the numbers they put out, to be the enforcers of this parking meter project.Maybe these are the “house slaves” Ifa Cush is talking about, trying to control the motorists who they see as the field slaves.Do they consider this Parking Meter Project to be of higher priority than the municipal markets where shoppers and vendors conduct business each day? Do they consider it a higher priority than their municipal locations where large sums of monies are collected? Do they consider it a higher priority than the enforcement of the City’s By-laws? Or do they consider it a higher priority than stopping persons from being mugged on the streets?I believe the City Constabulary needs to create a list of its priorities and then number them, as I doubt whether there has been a surge in recruitment leading to full staff strength. They are there to protect and to serve, not to be henchmen to contractors and enforcers of special interests.People are molested and robbed in and around our markets on a daily basis and there is hardly ever a Constable in sight, yet when the many booting exercises are being done, they are right there menacing and even arresting motorists as though they are criminals.So will they use this as an excuse to once again re-engage without bidding, the private guard service that is affiliated to a serving Councillor from their Municipality?Sincerely,Anu Biharilast_img read more

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Clark Asks: Mural tells tale of Orchards

first_imgLauren Smith frequently drives by a mural in Orchards depicting local life in the early 1900s. The 70-foot-long mural has a prune-picking family standing in front of an orchard, Mount St. Helens (with its top), the Orchards Feed Mill and the Orchards-Sifton streetcar.It’s a lot packed into a single scene — one that confused Smith.Curious about the history of the mural and clock courtyard at Northeast Covington Road and Northeast Fourth Plain Boulevard, she recently submitted a question to The Columbian’s Clark Asks feature.“I’ve always been a very inquisitive person, especially when it comes to the local community. I love to learn about the history behind specific artwork or areas in Clark County,” she said in an email. “One of the things that always caught my attention was the fact that the mural depicts the Orchards Feed Mill as well as a train station — yet as far as I know, there is not a railroad track near the current Orchards Feed Mill. Overall, I’m really curious to find out what person or group was responsible for the mural’s creation, and the story behind what the mural is depicting.”Good eye.The main artist behind the mural, Guy Drennan, explained that the scene is a composite of several historic photos. In 2002, tasked with painting a mural that shows how Orchards got its name, he went to the Clark County Historical Society with Linda Peterson and was directed to a filing cabinet full of photos. The resulting mural mushes together a few images they photocopied.“Fourth Plain was lined with prune drying operations,” Drennan said.Clark County once claimed to be the prune capital of the U.S. and had dozens of prune dryers and orchards, and even a couple of canneries. Yes, prunes are the main reason Orchards is called Orchards.last_img read more

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