Canadian Eventers Crowd the Leaderboard at The Fork and Chattahoochee Hills

first_img Horse Sport Enews SIGN UP Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! Email* We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. Canadian athletes made a strong statement with multiple top-10 placings at The Fork & 2018 FEI World Equestrian Games (WEG) Eventing Test Event in Mill Spring, NC, on April 6-8, 2018, as well as at the Chattahoochee Hills Horse Trials in Fairburn, GA, on April 7-8.The WEG Test Event provided the Canadian Equestrian Team athletes with the opportunity to get a feel for the grounds, rings and courses at the Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC), which will host WEG in September 2018.Lisa Marie Fergusson of Langley, BC was the top-ranked Canadian in the CIC 3* division of the WEG Test Event. She placed 11th with Honor Me, her 12-year-old Welsh Sport Horse gelding sired by Brynarian Brenin, known affectionately as ‘Tali’. On April 6, Fergusson and Tali started off in 23rd place with a dressage score of 34.70 penalties. The following day, they catapulted to 10th in the standings after executing a clear cross-country round with just two time penalties. Fergusson and Tali completed the event on a score of 43.50 after the show jumping phase, in which they incurred two penalty points.A strong Canadian contingent followed Fergusson’s lead: Jessica Phoenix of Cannington, ON placed 12th with 44.80 on Amara Hoppner’s 11-year-old Thoroughbred gelding, Bogue Sound, Colleen Loach of Dunham, QC placed 13th with 45.50 on Peter Barry’s 14-year-old Selle Français gelding, Qorry Blue D’Argouges, and Phoenix also placed 14th (46.20 penalties) on her veteran major games partner, Pavarotti (Pavarotti Van De Helle x Foxiland), Don J. Good’s 16-year-old Westphalian gelding.In the CIC 2* division, Dasha Ivandaeva of Newmarket, ON earned eighth place on Daria Ivandaeva’s 16-year-old Polish Warmblood gelding, Autorytet (Banita x Askar). The duo started in 14th place with a score of 38.30 penalties after dressage, but improved in the cross-country and show jumping rounds to rise to eighth with a final score of 61.50.Loach racked up top 10 placings in the CIC 1* division riding a triple-threat string of horses. She nabbed fourth riding Foreign Quality (Warrant x Calvados), a seven-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding owned by Peter Barry and known around the barn as ‘Badger’. The pair began in ninth place after incurring 31.60 penalties in the dressage test. They only added one time penalty to climb to fifth after show jumping, and 4.40 time penalties after a clear jumping effort cross-country to end in fourth on a score of 37.00.Loach also stayed in the top 10 throughout all three phases on Barry’s six-year-old Hanoverian gelding, Vermont (Van Helsing x Heraldik XX), on whom she scored 41.70 to finish in seventh place. She placed ninth with her own six-year-old Hanoverian gelding, FE Golden Eye (Goldfever x Contendro I), finishing on a score of 46.50 penalties.“I am very lucky to have such a talented string of young horses coming up behind Qorry,” said Loach of her CIC 1* mounts. “Badger, Vermont and FE Golden Eye are improving every time out, and it is a pleasure to see them learn and evolve. I am very grateful for all of the support I receive from Peter and Susan Barry, Mandy Bernhard and my parents, and I look forward to the future with these youngsters.”Loach was joined in the CIC 1* top 10 by Bradley Champagne of Guelph, ON, who captured 10th place with a score of 58.20 penalties on his 10-year-old Thoroughbred/Warmblood gelding, Wallaroo W, sired by Staccatto.Success at Chattahoochee HillsCanadian athletes also saw success at the Chattahoochee Hills Horse Trials. Holly Jacks-Smither of Orangeville, ON was the top-placed Canadian in the CIC 3* division, capturing seventh place on More Inspiration, a 13-year-old Thoroughbred gelding sired by Inspired Prospect that she co-owns with her husband, Bruce Smither. The pair held on to ninth place throughout the dressage and jumping phases, but jumped clear on cross-country, and added just 8.80 time penalties, pushing them to a seventh place finish on a final score of 47.40.Hawley Bennett-Awad of Aldergrove, BC was right behind Jacks-Smither in eighth place, scoring 51.50 on her 14-year-old British Sport Horse mare, Jollybo (Jumbo x Danzig Connection). Kyle Carter, a Canadian who resides in Sparr, FL, scored 51.50 for ninth place on FR’s Trust Fund (Ringfort Tinkatoo x Head of the River), the 12-year-old Dutch Warmblood/Thoroughbred gelding he co-owns with Jennifer and Riley Carter.In the CIC 2* division, Shelby Brost of Red Deer, AB climbed to fifth place on her 15-year-old Thoroughbred mare, Crimson (Etta x Cojak). After starting out in 10th with 37.20 penalties in dressage, she rode a foot-perfect show jumping round and added just 8.40 time penalties cross-country rounds to finish up with a total of 44.80.Carter followed in eighth place, scoring 58.80 on Sumas Cooley, the seven-year-old Irish Sport Horse gelding he co-owns with Jennifer Carter.For more information and full results from the Chattahoochee Hills April Horse Trials, visit www.chatthillseventing.com. For full results from The Fork FEI Eventing WEG Test Event, click here.The Fork FEI Eventing WEG Test Event – Top 20 Canadian ResultsCIC 3*Placing / Athlete / Horse / Owner / Final Score11th / Lisa Marie Fergusson / Honor Me / Lisa Marie Fergusson / 43.5012th / Jessica Phoenix / Bogue Sound / Amara Hoppner / 44.8013th / Colleen Loach / Qorry Blue D’Argouges / Peter Barry / 45.4014th / Jessica Phoenix / Pavarotti / Don J. Good / 46.2018th / Karl Slezak / Fernhill Wishes / Kirk Hoppner & Karl Slezak / 48.20CIC 2*Placing / Athlete / Horse / Owner / Final Score8th / Dasha Ivandaeva / Autorytet / Daria Ivandaeva / 61.50CIC 1*Placing / Athlete / Horse / Owner / Final Score4th / Colleen Loach / Foreign Quality / Peter Barry / 37.007th / Colleen Loach / Vermont / Peter Barry / 41.709th / Colleen Loach / FE Golden Eye / Colleen Loach / 46.5010th / Bradley Champagne / Wallaroo W / Bradley Champagne / 58.2015th / Dasha Ivandaeva / Valentina / Dasha Ivandaeva / 87.00Chattahoochee Hills April Horse Trials – Top 20 Canadian ResultsCIC 3*Placing / Athlete / Horse / Owner / Final Score7th / Holly Jacks-Smither / More Inspiration / Bruce Smither & Holly Jacks-Smither / 47.408th / Hawley Bennett-Awad / Jollybo / Hawley Bennett-Awad / 51.509th / Kyle Carter / FR’s Trust Fund / Kyle, Jennifer & Riley Carter / 51.50CIC 2*Placing / Athlete / Horse / Owner / Final Score5th / Shelby Brost / Crimson / Shelby Brost / 44.808th / Kyle Carter / Sumas Cooley / Kyle & Jennifer Carter / 58.80 Tags: Lisa Marie Fergusson, Honor Me, 2018 World Equestrian Games, Chattahoochee Hills Horse Trials, More Inspiration, 2018 WEG Eventing, The Fork WEG Eventing Test Event, Holly Jacks-Smithe, More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business.last_img read more

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Kyle Busch grabs top spot in final New Hampshire practice

first_imgRELATED: Final practice results | Truex on pole | Weekend scheduleKyle Busch secured the top spot in final Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series practice Saturday at New Hampshire Motor Speedway.Busch, a two-time New Hampshire winner, clocked a fast lap of 130.950 mph around the 1.058-mile track. Busch’s Joe Gibbs Racing No. 18 Toyota is scheduled to start seventh in Sunday’s Overton’s 301 (3 p.m. ET, NBCSN, PRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio).Martin Truex Jr. and Denny Hamlin tied for second on the leaderboard, posting identical speeds of 130.568 mph. Truex’s Furniture Row Racing No. 78 Toyota will lead the 39-car field to green after claiming the Coors Light Pole in Friday qualifying. Hamlin’s speed came in a back-up car, unloaded after his primary car was damaged in a crash in opening practice.Kyle Larson landed the fourth-fastest spot in final practice at 130.514 mph in the Chip Ganassi Racing No. 42 Chevrolet. Larson will start last in Sunday’s 301-lapper after his apparent pole-winning qualifying speed was disallowed Friday.Chase Elliott completed the top five, just ahead of Hendrick Motorsports teammate Jimmie Johnson in the 55-minute final tune-up.Aric Almirola, set to make his first start after a seven-race absence because of injury, was 21st-fastest in the Richard Petty Motorsports No. 43 Ford. Almirola has been sidelined since suffering a broken back in a May 13 crash at Kansas Speedway.Seven teams had time deducted from Saturday’s final practice for either failing pre-race inspection last week at Kentucky Speedway or pre-qualifying inspection Friday at New Hampshire — or both. The following teams were held for 15 minutes:Stewart-Haas Racing No. 4 Ford of Kevin HarvickHendrick Motorsports No. 24 Chevrolet of Chase ElliottHendrick Motorsports No. 88 Chevrolet of Dale Earnhardt Jr.The following teams were docked 30 minutes of time in final practice:Stewart-Haas Racing No. 14 Ford of Clint BowyerChip Ganassi Racing No. 42 Chevrolet of Kyle LarsonFurniture Row Racing No. 77 Toyota of Erik JonesCircle Sport/The Motorsports Group No. 33 Chevrolet of Jeffrey EarnhardtTruex tops in Saturday early practiceRELATED: Practice 2 results | Best 10-lap timesCoors Light Pole winner Martin Truex Jr. backed up his show of speed Saturday morning in the second Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series practice at New Hampshire Motor Speedway.Truex, the series’ points leader, registered the fastest lap in the 55-minute session, driving the Furniture Row Racing No. 78 Toyota to a 131.338 mph speed. He’ll start first in Sunday’s Overton’s 301 (3 p.m. ET, NBCSN, PRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio) on the 1.058-mile track.Kyle Larson, second to Truex in the standings, was also second to Truex on the practice leaderboard, just .001 seconds back at 131.333 mph in the Chip Ganassi Racing No. 42 Chevrolet. Larson had initially taken first place in Friday’s qualifying, but his speed was disallowed after his car failed post-qualifying inspection for an unapproved rear decklid fin.Jimmie Johnson was third-fastest in the Hendrick Motorsports No. 48 Chevrolet at 131.184 mph, just ahead of his teammate Chase Elliott in fourth (131.162). Brad Keselowski rounded out the top five (131.071) in the Team Penske No. 2 Ford.Aric Almirola, in the midst of his first race weekend since breaking his back in a May 13 crash at Kansas, was 25th-fastest in the Richard Petty Motorsports No. 43 Ford.Teams experimented with different racing grooves after track workers re-applied the PJ1 traction agent in the turns. Officials added to the bottom lane and then extended the top lane with a four-foot wide strip of the traction compound before Saturday’s on-track activity.last_img read more

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Jerry Garcia Alligator Guitar, Other Items Owned By His Estate Go Up For Auction

first_imgJerry Garcia‘s famed Alligator custom Fender Stratocaster guitar is going up for auction. The guitar is one of several items from the late Grateful Dead guitarist that will be auctioned off by Bonhams at the upcoming “Alligator! A San Franciso Rock Star’s Guitars, Art & More” event, set to take place on December 10th in Los Angeles.Jerry Garcia used Alligator as his main guitar from mid-1971 to mid-1973, was originally purchased by Graham Nash in 1970 from a pawn shop in Phoenix and gifted to Jerry. According to an article published on Fender.com, Alligator underwent many modifications. “The Dead were gear obsessives from the start,” explains Fender.com, ” And their innovations in live sound would come to transform the industry. By the time Nash gifted Garcia with the Strat, the band had spun off their own instrument and gear-building auxiliary company, the still-operational Alembic. With guidance by Dead sound guru and former LSD chemist Owsley Stanley, the technicians at Alembic experimented constantly, and Garcia’s Strat found itself on the Alembic workbench numerous times.”JerryGarcia.com notes that Jerry last played the guitar on-stage at Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City, New Jersey on August 1st, 1973 and that Alligator is currently owned by the Jerry Garcia Estate.Related: A Brief History Of Jerry Garcia’s Five Most Well-Known GuitarsAnother Jerry Garcia guitar featured in the auction is a Martin D-28 acoustic Garcia used during the multi-band Festival Express tour of Canada in 1970. Garcia’s classic comic book collection is also included in the auction, split up into multiple lots. Other items include Jerry’s collection of Mad magazines, as well as amplifiers, test pressings of an Aoxomoxoa remix and Workingman’s Dead, gold records, a set of typed lyrics for “Passenger” with annotations by Garcia, and a signed picture of Larry Bird.More details on all items going up for auction can be found here.[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

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Stint with FDNY ‘A Proving Ground’ for West Point Cadets Preparing for Battlefield Deployments

first_imgThe ride-alongs are part of Zederbaum’s rapid-fire class, which crams about 170 hours of instruction into several weeks. Zederbaum said the exercise was intended to give cadets the necessary experience to be certified as EMTs, plus a clinical awareness of injuries they may see on the battlefield. The cadets can perform CPR and other procedures, but they’re not allowed to stick anyone with a needle. “This place is a proving ground,” said Benjamin Zederbaum, who runs the recently established cadet medical intensive training course at West Point. “It’s trial by fire. There’s drama here. This is a tough town.” “It’s a perfect fit,” said John Peruggia, chief of the Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Service Command. “We have many difficult and challenging assignments every day. We wanted to give them some practical exposure.” It turned out the man had only a bad cut on a lip. More than three dozen cadets hit city streets Saturday for a double shift with the Fire Department’s emergency medical technicians, who handle everything from traffic accidents to construction crane collapses. NEW YORK — Before they hit the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan, West Point cadets have gotten a taste of chaos, New York City style.center_img Cadet Zachary West, 18, saw trauma on his first call. He was a little rattled when he saw a man covered in blood, but pulled himself together and immediately helped, following instructions from an EMT. Last month, cadets on a similar training stint delivered a baby and performed CPR on seven people, saving two of them. If cadets see injuries on deployments, “at least it won’t be the first time,” said Fire Department Capt. John Wieland. Peruggia said FDNY will answer about 1.5 million calls this year. About 500,000 to 600,000 of those calls are categorized as immediately or potentially life-threatening. “It was intense,” said Cadet Emily, 23, who was unable to revive a 62-year-old woman who had no pulse. “When the time comes, I won’t be bogged down by fear.”last_img read more

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Students comment on Blinkie schedule change

first_imgRiding on Blinkie is a time-honored tradition for Saint Mary’s students. The dark blue van with an eponymous orange blinking light on top runs on campus from dark until 2 a.m. each day, taking students to their various on-campus destinations, such as residence halls and the library when they might not want to walk alone. Blinkie’s route includes the Grotto after The Sweep stops for the night. Stops at the Grotto also occur on the weekends, when “The Sweep” does not run. Tom Naatz | The Observer Students wait for Blinkie to pick them up from the bus stop at the corner of Holy Cross Drive and Saint Mary’s Road Thursday night. It was recently announced that Blinkie will begin running on the weekends.In an email sent to the Saint Mary’s student body Oct. 27, vice president for student affairs Karen Johnson said Blinkie service would begin at noon on Saturdays and Sundays, making its usual route on campus before going to the Grotto at Notre Dame. According to the email, the route should take about 45 minutes.Last year, Blinkie made trips to the Grotto on Sunday afternoons from fall break to spring break.Sunday Blinkie service was funded by the Student Government Association (SGA) last year. Since The Sweep no longer runs on Saturdays, transportation between Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame, an additional day of the service was added for this year.In a subsequent email, Johnson said the service was utilized by many students last year. SGA will once again be paying for this service, she said.Freshman Madi Holdsworth said she and her friends ride in Blinkie every weekend and at least one time during most weeks.“We love Blinkie,” Holdsworth said. “It’s a great idea.”She said she sometimes walks to Notre Dame on Sundays for Mass but would not be affected much by the Sunday service because it begins later than she would leave Saint Mary’s to attend Mass.Because of its service to the Grotto, Blinkie affects more than just Saint Mary’s students. Without the Transpo Midnight Express running on Friday and Saturday nights, the van is the only free transportation between Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s.Notre Dame junior Spencer Buzdon said he’s taken Blinkie numerous times over the past several years and has noticed a change in the experience of the ride.“Now that they’ve cancelled the Midnight Express, I feel like Blinkie has been a lot more crowded and difficult to use,” Buzdon said. “I think it’s even a matter of safety.”Every time he has ridden in the van this year, someone has been forced to stand, he said. Sometimes Buzdon himself stands in the trunk.“This year, I’ve found that Blinkie is really trying to pick up the slack that has been left by the Midnight Express, and it’s not equipped to do that job,” Buzdon said.Saint Mary’s students have also noticed a crowded van on Friday and Saturday nights.“I don’t take [Blinkie] often, but there’s only been one time this year that I wasn’t standing in the trunk,” junior Brynne Volpe said.While current freshmen did not have the opportunity to utilize the Midnight Express, they have also reported that the van is occasionally uncomfortable and crowded.“There was a time the first weekend that [my friends and I] were on Blinkie, and there were people on top of each other and in the trunk,” freshman Elena Sarmiento said. “In the trunk, people would just stand and pack together.”Since then, Sarmiento said she has seen large crowds late on weekend nights.Despite these challenges, Johnson said the number of riders on Blinkie has not changed significantly.“Our Saturday and Sunday late night usage was busy for the first two weeks of classes,” Johnson said. “It has, however, leveled out to usage similar to last year.”Even when the van is crowded, students feel a sense of safety and community when they take advantage of the Blinkie service“You know when someone who’s not from Saint Mary’s is getting on Blinkie, and you know the drivers, too,” freshman Fiona Connelly said.She said the Blinkie drivers are always kind to student riders.“They’re so nice,” she said. “There was one time when someone felt sick, and [the driver] gave her a recycling bin.”Holdsworth said a driver once gave her a cough drop when she was coughing during a ride. Connelly praised the drivers for their attention to their riders.“The drivers are very chill, very nice and very thoughtful,” Connelly said.Tags: blinkie, Midnight Express, saint mary’s, transportlast_img read more

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Berkshire Bank Foundation awards $5,000 to Burr & Burton Academy

first_imgBerkshire Bank,Berkshire Bank Foundation announced that it has awarded Burr & Burton Academy in Manchester, Vermont, a $5,000 grant to purchase equipment for low-income students so that they can participate in programs at the schoolâ s new Mountain Campus.  Burr and Burton Academy, an independent school that serves as the public high school for eleven towns in southern Vermontâ s mission is to educate students intellectually and morally for a life of responsibility, integrity and service. The Mountain Campus program which will launch in September 2012, will engage a small group of motivated students in a semester-long study of the mountain landscape: the earth and climate, plants and animals, people, history and culture. Students will receive credits in English, social studies, science, physical education and service learning.     The place-based, interdisciplinary curriculum includes active, field-based learning, adapted to fit with modern research findings on adolescent neurology, attention and memory.  The curriculum also includes real work, developing professional skills and building a strong community based on interaction with each other on site and outreach to the greater community around us.  Wilderness expeditions are also part of the program.  During these trips, the emphasis will be on learning wilderness skills, risk management, emergency medicine, team building and leadership, while exploring natural history, reading, journaling, and of course, having fun. The grant funds will be used to purchase the necessary equipment (boots, backpacks, waders, outdoor clothing, snow shoes) for students to participate in the program regardless of their ability to purchase the equipment.  Peter J. Lafayette, Executive Director of Berkshire Bank Foundation said â Berkshire Bank Foundation has a long history of support of Burr & Burton Academy. This grant award will help students that otherwise could not afford to participate in this new and innovative educational program. This experience will help these students learn valuable skillsets that will help them succeed in college and life. We are excited to continue our commitment to Burr & Burton Academy.â   While Berkshire Bank Foundationâ s priorities are education and community/economic development projects, it also donates to youth, cultural and human service organizations.  A complete list of Berkshire Bank Foundation supported organizations in 2012 can be found by visiting www.berkshirebank.com/foundation(link is external).In addition to financial support, the Foundation also administers the bankâ s growing Employee Volunteer Program that carries out group community service projects benefiting schools, nonprofit organizations and communities within the bankâ s service area. In 2011, Berkshire Bank employees completed 67 volunteer projects in which over 50% of the bankâ s employees participated donating over 26,000 hours of service through both company-sponsored and individual volunteer efforts to help their local communities. Berkshire Bank received National Recognition from the American Banker Association for its community service efforts through the Employee Volunteer Program this past February.   PITTSFIELD, MASS, June 28, 2012 ‘Berkshire Bank Foundationlast_img read more

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Ben & Jerry’s launches its newest line: Cookie Cores

first_imgOnly days into 2015 and it’s clear that the team of Flavor Gurus at Ben & Jerry’s have been hard at work. The ice cream maker unveiled its latest addition to the legendary line up of flavors – a collection of three decadent Cookie Cores that will leave fans of ice cream, cookies and cookie butters clamoring for more. The Cookie Core line utilizes the same design as Ben & Jerry’s popular 2014 Core flavors but instead of jam, fudge or caramel running directly through the middle of the pint, the Flavor Gurus have added cookie butters. The crunchy, swirly inclusion of spoonable cookies right down the center of each pint is a taste that must be eaten to be experienced. The Cookie Cores tie in favorites such as chocolate cookies, peanut butter cookies, and speculoos cookies (a cinnamon spice cookie) at their respective centers, and let fans customize the way they eat each and every pint.The combinations include:Boom Chocolatta! Cookie Core: Mocha & Caramel Ice Creams with Chocolate Cookies, Fudge Flakes & a Chocolate Cookie Core.Peanut Buttah Cookie Core: Peanut Butter Ice Cream with Crunchy Peanut Butter Sugar Bits, Peanut Butter Cookies & a Peanut Butter Cookie CoreSpectacular Speculoos Cookie Core: Dark Caramel & Vanilla Ice Cream with Speculoos Cookies & Speculoos Cookie Butter Core“I think our Flavor Gurus nailed it,” said CEO Jostein Solheim. “Along with the work to utilize Fairtrade and non-GMO ingredients they managed to prove their artisan hand at making something creative, indulgent and delicious,” added Solheim the honorary top taste-tester at the Vermont headquarters, who chooses Spectacular Speculoos as his favorite.The Cookie Cores tested off the charts in early trials, leading Ben & Jerry’s to believe they found a new and exciting way for their fans to experience cookies and ice cream together. “These flavors are over the top, classic Ben & Jerry’s decadence with incredible flavor combinations and textures. They deliver the promise on a truly remarkable ice cream eating experience. These are cookies you’ll want to spoon!” added Solheim.About Ben & Jerry’s®As an aspiring social justice company, Ben & Jerry’s believes in a greater calling than simply making a profit for selling its goods. The company produces a wide variety of super-premium ice cream, yogurt and sorbet using high-quality ingredients. Ben & Jerry’s incorporates its vision of Linked Prosperity into its business practices in a number of ways including a focus on values-led sourcing. In 2014 the company plans to complete its transition to using entirely non-GMO (genetically modified organisms) ingredients by source as well as to fully Fairtrade-certified ingredients wherever possible, which benefits farmers in developing countries. Ben and Jerry’s products are distributed in 35 countries in supermarkets, grocery stores, convenience stores, franchise Ben & Jerry’s Scoop Shops, restaurants and other venues. Ben & Jerry’s, a Vermont corporation and wholly-owned subsidiary of Unilever, operates its business on a three-part Mission Statement emphasizing product quality, economic reward and a commitment to the community. Ben & Jerry’s became a certified B Corp (Benefit Corporation) in 2012. The Ben & Jerry’s Foundation’s employee-led grant programs totaled $2.5MM in 2013 to support economic and social justice, environmental restoration, and peace through understanding. For the inside scoop on Ben & Jerry’s visit www.benjerry.com(link is external).BURLINGTON, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE(link is external))–1.13.2015last_img read more

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Overland Park hopes state will pass LGBTQ anti-discrimination bill — but would consider own measure if legislature doesn’t act

first_imgMayor Carl Gerlach said the state was in a better position to enforce anti-discrimination measures than cities. File photo.Saying the Kansas legislature is the best venue for addressing discrimination issues, the Overland Park City Council on Monday affirmed its support of an anti-discrimination bill recently introduced in Topeka. However if the bill fails, Overland Park leaders vow to bring their own non-discrimination resolution up for discussion.The city became the latest in Johnson County to consider whether to formalize protections for LGBTQ residents. Mission, Merriam, Prairie Village, and in 2014, Roeland Park have all approved non-discrimination measures. But unlike Overland Park, the other cities enacted ordinances that work at the municipal level.Reps. Susan Ruiz and Brandon Woodard have introduced a bill in the House that would provide legal protections for LGBTQ Kansans. Photo credit office of Rep. Brandon Woodard.Overland Park took a different path with its resolution, which signaled Kansas’s second-largest city’s support for a change in state law proposed by the two first openly LGBTQ members of the Kansas legislature, Reps. Susan Ruiz and Brandon Woodard, both of the Shawnee Mission area.The state is in a better position to enforce discrimination issues than cities, said Mayor Carl Gerlach on Monday. With a state anti-discrimination law in place, victims could sue for damages. But the most a city can do with an ordinance is levy a fine, Gerlach said.The measure approved Monday puts the city on record against discrimination by sexual orientation. But it would have to be revisited if state lawmakers don’t approve their non-discrimination bill. In that case, the council would have to come back and devise some mechanism for enforcement, he said.Council members at a committee of the whole meeting indicated they were willing to do that. Councilmember Curt Skoog offered to bring it before the council’s community development committee, which he chairs.A non-discrimination bill in the statehouse has potential this year. The bills in the House and Senate have 53 sponsors, and Gov. Laura Kelly has reinstated protections for LGBTQ citizens that were eliminated by former Gov. Sam Brownback. But there is opposition. After the bills were introduced, opponents put forward one that would label same-sex marriages “parody” marriages and seek to stop the state from recognizing them.Council members expressed no reservations about the non-discrimination measure.“I think it’s great that a city of our size and magnitude in Kansas as the second largest city – it says a lot by doing this,” said Councilmember Chris Newlin.Gerlach said there are a lot of questions about the kinds of ordinances that have been passed by other cities, including whether such ordinances are even legal. But approving an ordinance without some way to enforce it is “not the way we work,” he said. “Hopefully we all agree that we want to get rid of all discrimination in our city,” he said.last_img read more

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Census 2020 self-response rate in Johnson County nears 75%

first_imgThe 2020 Census allowed people living in the United States to self-report online, something Emily Kelley, census partnership coordinator for Kansas and Oklahoma, said has helped the self-response rate.“Our internet self-response numbers are above our projections,” Kelly said. “We’re a little bit ahead of where we thought we would be for self-response nationwide.”In Johnson County, the self-response rate is nearing 75 percent, just behind the total self-response rate from the 2010 Census. There are still about two months left until census fieldworkers will start checking on households that didn’t self-report.Even with the ability to self-report online, Kelley said the response rate is higher than was expected.Paige Wilson, media specialist with the U.S. Census Bureau, said the comparison between 2010 and 2020 is kind of like comparing “apples and oranges” because the 2010 Census didn’t have online or mobile self-reporting available. The 2020 Census is the first census to allow digital self-reporting.Online, mobile options strengthen responseWith online and mobile options now available, self-reporting is easier, Kelley said.All households still received geo-coded census packets. The census can be completed on that questionnaire and sent it, or someone can take the household code from the packet and use it to complete the census online. People can also fill out the census via the phone.If the initial deadline isn’t met for self-reporting, another census packet will be mailed to uncounted households.The reference date — April 1 — is the day that a household’s count should be conducted based on. By April 1, 2020, the novel coronavirus had shut down the United States, keeping most people in their homes. While it’s affected the field operations, the pandemic hasn’t had much of an impact on the self-reporting procedures, Kelley said.“I don’t know about you but I have my phone with me almost all the time, and responding to the census online takes about five minutes, maybe 10 minutes if you have a bigger household,” Kelley said. “It’s easy, it’s quick and it’s important.”In the fall, field workers will go out to count the households who failed to self-report. By Oct. 31, Kelley said, the full count should be complete.Why is the Census so important?An accurate count will set the tone for the next decade in Kansas, Kelley said. In addition to informing how local districts are drawn, the census count will decide the fate of billions of dollars of federal funding for public health, emergency response preparedness, education, social services and other critical infrastructure and programs. It will also determine congressional representation.“The COVID-19 pandemic really underscores why the count is important,” Kelley said. “So many of the relief programs to help with our fight against COVID-19 have been based on decennial census numbers.”To complete the census online, visit the 2020 Census website.last_img read more

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Architecture 2030 Seeks To Lower Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Energy Consumption

first_imgArchitect Edward Mazria established Architecture 2030, a nonprofit, non-partisan and independent organization, in response to the climate change crisis in 2002.Architecture 2030’s mission is to rapidly transform the United States and the global-building sector from the major contributor of greenhouse gas emissions to a central part of the solution.Its goal is straightforward: to achieve a dramatic reduction in the climate change causing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the building sector by changing the way buildings and developments are planned, designed and constructed.Mazria sat down with AZRE Magazine to talk about Architecture 2030:How can the industry determine if Architecture 2030 is truly having an impact on the environment?An independent survey taken in the Building Sector in 2010 by the Design Futures Council indicated that Architecture 2030 is the industry leader in moving environmental issues forward in the U.S. Architecture 2030 also looks at sector greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption statistics to gauge the effectiveness of our work. While sector emissions have been dropping in recent years, it’s been very difficult to determine the precise impact of the 2030 targets. What we do know however, is that of the list of 160-plus architecture firms that have signed on to the 2030 Commitment so far, most are making progress toward reducing the energy consumption of their building designs. We are also seeing incorporation of the 2030 Challenge targets into local and state building codes across the U.S. At the federal level, the Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act of 2011 was introduced in the U.S. Senate. This bipartisan bill places meeting the 2030 Challenge target of zero-net energy for new buildings by 2030 as the first item in a comprehensive strategy for U.S. energy reductions.What are the qualifying metrics you use to determine success?We measure success by the number of building sector firms adopting the 2030 Challenge targets, the number of state and local governments incorporating the targets in their building energy codes, and whether we see a significant statistical level of energy consumption reductions in the building sector annually.What remains the greatest hurdle in the building industry to successfully meeting and sustaining practices that are good for people and the environment?Architecture 2030 is working to develop a comprehensive and accessible design language that can be shared among professionals worldwide. Our hope is that this will accelerate the building sector transformation to true sustainability that is already underway. The language is similar in scope to that developed in the 1920s and 1930s that defined and helped establish the modern movement.What can the industry do to clear that hurdle?As the industry designs buildings to meet the 2030 Challenge, some of these buildings will exceed, meet or fall short of the targets. As long as we keep at it and continue on an exponential learning curve, we will advance toward our goal of carbon-neutral design by 2030.Where or how do you see Arizona excelling in sustainable design and building practices? Are we in line with national commitments or exceeding in any areas?That’s hard for me to gauge, but we know that many firms in Arizona have adopted the 2030 Challenge and are working aggressively to meet its targets. We are now seeing many examples of regional buildings that push the envelope and exceed the 2030 targets. There are quite a number (of Arizona architectural firms) that not only are having a local impact on moving sustainability issues forward, but are having a national impact as well.How does Architecture 2030 relate to or view the USGBC LEED programs or other such programs? Do they compete or support one another or simply provide different services?There are various groups and organizations impacting our sector and moving it toward being more environmentally responsible. This includes environmental and building industry groups, as well as a large number of professional and government organizations. Together, we are all kicking the ball down field. Architecture 2030 has collaborated with many of these organizations in the past and will continue to do so in the future.How is Architecture 2030 changing the way that we live and do business? What will the industry look like in your vision of 2030?In 2003, the building sector’s role in U.S. and global energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions was exposed in a series of articles published in Solar Today and Metropolis Magazine. Prior to that, it was thought the transportation sector — more specifically, SUVs — was the environmental culprit of excessive energy consumption and emissions. Architecture 2030, along with the architecture and design community, was the first to dispel this myth and identify the building sector as the largest emitter of greenhouse gas emissions. This immediately changed the global dialogue on climate change. Between now and 2030, the building sector will transform, and I believe that this transformation will be as dramatic and far reaching as the one that came about because of the industrial revolution.You recently unveiled Architecture 2030 for Products. What was the motivation for another sustainable program and how is this helping?The 2030 Challenge has three key areas of focus. In 2006 we issued the 2030 Challenge for buildings; in 2008, the 2030 Challenge for Planning; and this year — on Valentine’s Day as our gift to the planet — we announced the 2030 Challenge for Products. Collectively, the Challenge now covers most everything relating to buildings and emissions, from planning cities and developments to the manufacturing and use of building products.The 2030 Challenge for Products aims for the global architecture, planning, design, and building community to specify, design, and manufacture products for new developments, buildings and renovations to meet a maximum carbon equivalent footprint of 30% below the product category average through 2014 — increasing this reduction to 35% in 2015, 40% in 2020, 45% in 2025, and 50% by 2030.While the majority of the sector energy consumption, and its associated emissions, comes from building operations, the embodied energy and emissions of building products are also becoming increasingly significant. Approximately 5% to 8% of total annual U.S. energy consumption and associated emissions is for building products and construction. When including all products for the built environment (infrastructure, furniture, movable equipment, appliances, etc.), the percentage is even greater.For more information about Architecture 2030, visit www.architecture2030.org.last_img read more

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